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Old 11-21-2008, 02:08 AM   #1
zoombee
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how to extract the files from a vfat .img image file, without mounting


I would like to know if there is any posibility to extract the content of a floppy disk image (.img file, shown as vfat when mounted), without using "mount". And I wonder if there is any free program for Windows that can do that (there is a commercial program: WinImage).
 
Old 11-21-2008, 04:50 AM   #2
pixellany
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Why don't you want to mount it?

You might try testdisk and see if it knows how to operate on image files.

What's "Windows"?.....

Last edited by pixellany; 11-21-2008 at 04:51 AM.
 
Old 11-21-2008, 02:45 PM   #3
zoombee
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according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Initrd:
The "loopback" method uses the kernel file system drivers to manipulate a file, rather than a hardware device. This is unpopular with many administrators because it requires Root privileges to be used. As it is theoretically possible to create a filesystem image purely from userspace, this breaks the doctrine of "no unnecessary root activity"
So I was wondering if there is a better way to do that, considering that using "mount" is seen as not so good.

Unfortunately, Windows is the only OS that:
- can run a great program like http://www.autohotkey.com. There is no Linux alternative for that program. And it's somewhat ridiculous not to be able to define keyboard shortcuts and macros, especially in Linux, where you are supposed to be able to do everything faster, without using the mouse.
- has good fonts. By the way, how much can it cost to make or even buy some fonts and then release them for free?
- has a good interface. Sometimes, in Ubuntu the menus take too long to open, and are not as responsive as in Windows.
 
Old 11-21-2008, 02:48 PM   #4
zoombee
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Indeed, I just tried mount as a regular user and got:
"mount: only root can do that"
 
Old 11-21-2008, 03:02 PM   #5
johnson_steve
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what? I use loopback all the time you just have to be root to mount it and unmount it, not to use it once it's mounted. I don't see this as a bad security threat at all. also with xmodmap and xbindkeys I can make any key on my keyboard do anything I want. I've never had a problem with the fonts that came on my system but I do believe you can use windows fonts in linux. a good interface? look just because you have a problem with gnome on your computer you can't accuse linux of not having a good interface. gnome is only one of three full featured 'Desktop environments' available and there are a lot of more striped down 'window managers' that are even faster. Unlike windows or mac where you have only one interface that you are stuck with you have a choice on linux.

Edit:
You can set up your sudoers file and make mounting and unmounting your image or anything available to your regular user with or without a password.

Last edited by johnson_steve; 11-21-2008 at 03:04 PM.
 
Old 11-21-2008, 03:34 PM   #6
syg00
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Have a look at your mount options in fstab.
 
Old 11-22-2008, 11:02 PM   #7
zoombee
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Quote:
I use loopback all the time you just have to be root to mount it and unmount it, not to use it once it's mounted. I don't see this as a bad security threat at all.
In that nasty Windows operating system, a user can acces what is inside a vfat file without calling the administrator to give him access. With Linux, he has to call the administrator to mount the file for him.

Quote:
also with xmodmap and xbindkeys I can make any key on my keyboard do anything I want.
I just installed xbindkeys and xbindkeys-config on a fresh Ubuntu 8.10. I started xbind-config, and when I push "Get key" the program exits, graciously letting me know that "a segmentation fault ocurred". Also using xbindkeys seems not intuitive at all. After installing it, I can't find a shortcut to it on the desktop or main menu, the man page does not tell how to start the program and such.

Quote:
I've never had a problem with the fonts that came on my system but I do believe you can use windows fonts in linux.
I do have a problem with fonts in Linux, even this page looks crappy in Firefox with Gnome, in Windows looks just much better.
Maybe you can use windows fonts in Linux, but then you have to pay a Windows licence to do that. Also, I can write my own operatin system, isn't it? Or I can make my own fonts. Or I can even send a rocket to the Moon if I really want it....

Quote:
a good interface? look just because you have a problem with gnome on your computer you can't accuse linux of not having a good interface. gnome is only one of three full featured 'Desktop environments' available and there are a lot of more striped down 'window managers' that are even faster.
yes, I can use KDE and then some programs designed for Gnome won't even start. It happened to me not to be able to start gparted on KDE.

Quote:
Unlike windows or mac where you have only one interface that you are stuck with you have a choice on linux.
Yes, there are faster interfaces than Gnome but also with less features.

Quote:
Edit:
You can set up your sudoers file and make mounting and unmounting your image or anything available to your regular user with or without a password.
Yes but once a user is sudoer, it can "sudo su" and become administrator, which is not desirable in many cases.

I am sorry if my answers looked hostile, please don't take it personally, but I'm a bit tired of getting answers like "Linux is so much better than Windows, you have so many options", while in fact the real "more options" is to install programs that don't interact well, spend a lot of time learning things he does not really want or have to, etc.

I can't see how you can ask regular people to believe that Linux is better than other Operating Systems when you ask them to do complicated tasks like recompiling the kernel, write their own drivers, make scripts, etc. Those kind of things can take years to master and some people want to just use the computer, not to become kernel hacker gurus.

Last edited by zoombee; 11-22-2008 at 11:04 PM.
 
Old 11-22-2008, 11:13 PM   #8
billymayday
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Hostile and uninformed.

Set up sudo to only allow the user to execute mount. Pretty simple. Do a search of LQ to find out how.

Yes, any windows administrator account can mount stuff (and perhaps non-admins), but the fact windows lets/allows/encourages users to sit in that mode is why there are so many malware issues areound.
 
Old 11-22-2008, 11:26 PM   #9
jschiwal
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Quote:
In that nasty Windows operating system, a user can acces what is inside a vfat file without calling the administrator to give him access. With Linux, he has to call the administrator to mount the file for him.
Not if sudoers or PolicyKit is setup to allow a regular user to do it. I had to call IT to get write access to delete files in my c:\\temp directory so it wouldn't fill up. A service downloads videos there that I need at work, but it doesn't automatically delete old ones. Everyone will run into situations like this at work no matter which OS is used.

You needed to purchase a program, WinImage to be able to access the files inside. In linux you can mount the file yourself easily. IMHO, a program like that is a stupid backwards hack. Apparently, as a regular user, you are expected to write your own Windows loopback device driver to do it properly. What if the entire drive were imaged? Can you access every partition on it or do you need to find and purchase another program. Could your program allow you to access files on a partition when the partition table is damaged. Using losetup, and good guess that the first partition starts on block 63, you can mount the first partition. Then you can run df to find out how large it is and be able to locate and mount the second.

Last edited by jschiwal; 11-22-2008 at 11:32 PM.
 
Old 11-23-2008, 12:12 AM   #10
jiml8
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The other issues have been addressed.

Speaking for myself, I can set up any key on the keyboard to do whatever I want it to do using the facilities of KDE, and it works just fine.

I also just started GParted from KDE, and it started with no more issues than it usually has (I don't like it). It is up and running now.
 
Old 11-23-2008, 12:23 AM   #11
johnson_steve
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Wow you seem kind of closeminded. just fyi I will answer some of your concerns.

Quote:
In that nasty Windows operating system, a user can acces what is inside a vfat file without calling the administrator to give him access. With Linux, he has to call the administrator to mount the file for him.
Quote:
Yes but once a user is sudoer, it can "sudo su" and become administrator, which is not desirable in many cases.
This is not true. sudoers can set up privledges on a per user and per program basis. allowing regular users the ability to do things the sysadmin has alowed them to do without giving them the ability to do anything else was what sudo was made for you do have to be the admin to set it up but since it's your computer that shouldn't be a problem. if it's set up right you wil be able to 'sudo mount' anything you want but not 'sudo su' and be root.

Quote:
I just installed xbindkeys and xbindkeys-config on a fresh Ubuntu 8.10. I started xbind-config, and when I push "Get key" the program exits, graciously letting me know that "a segmentation fault ocurred". Also using xbindkeys seems not intuitive at all. After installing it, I can't find a shortcut to it on the desktop or main menu, the man page does not tell how to start the program and such.
Well I've never used xbind-config I usualy use xev to find the keycodes for the key in question and then add an entry to my '~/.xbindkeysrc' file. xfce has an 'autostarted applications' feature and I set it up to run xbindkeys everytime I log in. this isn't the fancy way to do things but nothing can crash and it's a simple cut and paste thing. Ive managed to bind all the special keys on my laptop.

Quote:
I do have a problem with fonts in Linux, even this page looks crappy in Firefox with Gnome, in Windows looks just much better.
Maybe you can use windows fonts in Linux, but then you have to pay a Windows licence to do that. Also, I can write my own operatin system, isn't it? Or I can make my own fonts. Or I can even send a rocket to the Moon if I really want it....
I don't know what fonts are installed on my computer; I didn't go out of my way to install new ones. I don't have a problem reading anything. nothing looks ugly. if something looks that bad to you there are countless fonts available for download all over the internet and if you allready had a copy of windows you couldn't get in any legal trouble for copying your windows fonts over to linux since you seem to like them so much.

Quote:
yes, I can use KDE and then some programs designed for Gnome won't even start. It happened to me not to be able to start gparted on KDE.
Quote:
Yes, there are faster interfaces than Gnome but also with less features.
Well I'm using xfce a fully functional desktop environment lighter then gnome or kde. I have all the needed gnome and kde libraries installed allowing me to run any program regardless if it is a gnome, kde, gtk, qt, tk/tcl or X application. any properly configured system should be able to run any program you have installed no matter what WM you use. if a gnome application fails to run for you it isn't because you are using kde it's because you do not have the required libraries and/or dependencies installed.

Every distro will require you to make some adjustments to get it working perfectly on your computer. the last few windows computers I built after I finished the install I had to go online a find drivers for almost everything and it was a nightmare to get working compared to most linux boxes I've built. If you want help with some specific issues like setting up sudo just ask, but general bitching about what you don't like or understand only demonstrates that maybe linux isn't for you.

Last edited by johnson_steve; 11-23-2008 at 12:29 AM.
 
Old 11-23-2008, 02:20 AM   #12
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Most people in this thread have something in common with myself, we like to tinker with the computer.
But most of you fail to see the position the majority of the population is in, not able to allocate as much time as most of you here for tinkering with the computer. And for a great number of the smarter ones living in a fast paced world, it is much wiser to spend $40.00 on software that can do the task with a couple clicks of the mouse rather than spend a few evenings/weeks/months learning all the steps the software goes through so you can do it manually (????).
For most people, it's not really all that practical, which is why it is not all that popular.

Quote:
while in fact the real "more options" is to install programs that don't interact well, spend a lot of time learning things he does not really want or have to, etc.
There does appear to be a lot of "hostility" in this thread, but not from the original poster.
 
Old 11-23-2008, 02:31 AM   #13
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Below is the actual question asked in this thread, can anybody answer the question rather than ask another question or criticize the OP's approach and/or reasons?
Quote:
how to extract the files from a vfat .img image file, without mounting
There is nothing in this question that provokes a dual between Linux & Windows, why is it starting to look that way?
 
Old 11-23-2008, 05:39 AM   #14
ErV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoombee View Post
I would like to know if there is any posibility to extract the content of a floppy disk image (.img file, shown as vfat when mounted), without using "mount". And I wonder if there is any free program for Windows that can do that (there is a commercial program: WinImage).
if "fuse" has support for vfat system, then ordinary user will be able to mount it. otherwise, root access rights are required. And no, I don't know good free program for that (so if you want one - google it). You could rip file with hex editor, but this will be painful process. Also you might want to search floppy image editor, but they probably don't support fat 32. WinHEX might have mechanics to extract files from image, but it is not free. Far Manager and Total Commander might have plugins that allow viewing contents of FAT32 images, but they also are not free (or were not free, at least). So the only free way to do this is mount. Also, please take a look at this. It is said that:
Quote:
1. If your post or new thread contains anything regarding Microsoft, it most likely belongs in General.
It might be a good idea if you have a thread that even mentions Microsoft or Windows, to just place it in General. The only reason to not place it there is if your setting up Samba or a dual boot system, anything that is a technical question asking for technical help if its alongside Linux, etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoombee View Post
I do have a problem with fonts in Linux, even this page looks crappy in Firefox with Gnome, in Windows looks just much better.
There are howtos on making fonts prettier.
Please either spend some time configuring fonts, or try opera.
Instead of complaining, either try to solve it, or ask how to solve it in separate thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoombee View Post
Maybe you can use windows fonts in Linux, but then you have to pay a Windows licence to do that.
WRONG. "Microsoft core fonts" are free. And they include most used windows fonts. Many people use them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoombee View Post
yes, I can use KDE and then some programs designed for Gnome won't even start. It happened to me not to be able to start gparted on KDE.
In this case I'd recommend you to learn how to use cfdisk. Also your system package manager should be able to handle GNOME dependencies automatically, so you can install KDE and still will be able to use GNOME applications. Also there are numerous replacements, like qparted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoombee View Post
Yes but once a user is sudoer, it can "sudo su" and become administrator, which is not desirable in many cases.
read man sudo. /etc/sudoers limits what user can sudo and what he can't. You can forbid calling "sudo su". Read "man sudo", and "man su".

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoombee View Post
I am sorry if my answers looked hostile, please don't take it personally, but I'm a bit tired of getting answers like "Linux is so much better than Windows, you have so many options", while in fact the real "more options" is to install programs that don't interact well, spend a lot of time learning things he does not really want or have to, etc.
IF you are tired of this, then stick to the topic, and don't start another linux vs windows war. Simply keep comments like "how you can ask regular people to believe that Linux is better" away from your questions (it isn't related to your question anyway), and everything will be fine. If you can't do that, you better ask your question in windows forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoombee View Post
I can't see how you can ask regular people to believe that Linux is better than other Operating Systems when you ask them to do complicated tasks like recompiling the kernel, write their own drivers, make scripts, etc. Those kind of things can take years to master and some people want to just use the computer, not to become kernel hacker gurus.
recompiling the kernel and writing scripts is a child's work. Recompiling kernel takes 1 day to master (there are many howtos on that).
Writing scripts takes 1 month to master, but that depends on how far you are willing to go. You aren't required to become bash guru, and it will take little amount of time to get basic knowledge.
YOu don't need to write your drivers and you don't need to become kernel guru, unless you want to participate in kernel development. Please, do not post misleading info, it might make other people confused.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zoombee View Post
In that nasty Windows operating system, a user can acces what is inside a vfat file without calling the administrator to give him access. With Linux, he has to call the administrator to mount the file for him.
Nonsense. Administrator does not mount files for every user. He configures the way filesystem is mounted, and after that every user can access every file he wants, as long as permission allows.

Last edited by ErV; 11-23-2008 at 05:43 AM.
 
  


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