LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 04-01-2005, 07:03 AM   #1
dokhang
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: Hoi An
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
How does linux manage files?


I'am a newbie with Linux. I'am suvery about Linux, i want to ask you how linux manages files, and how to known that ( as Windows is use debug). What is the partition Linux use? I know its not Fat32, not NTFS.
Very thanks if you view this thread. Thanks
 
Old 04-01-2005, 08:41 AM   #2
jonaskoelker
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Denmark
Distribution: Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 1,524

Rep: Reputation: 47

> I want to ask you how linux manages files,
excactly what do you mean by `manages'?

> and how to known that ( as Windows is use debug).
Read The Manual, Search The Web, Read The Source.

> What is the partition Linux use? I know its not Fat32, not NTFS.
common file systems are ext2, ext3, reiserfs, nfs, swap, proc, iso9660. Btw, I think it's perfectly possible to install a linux on a fat32 drive, but corrections are more than welcome.

> Very thanks if you view this thread. Thanks
np. hth.

Jonas Kölker.

btw, I think your post would have been better placed in Linux - Software

Last edited by jonaskoelker; 04-01-2005 at 08:44 AM.
 
Old 04-01-2005, 10:26 AM   #3
wartstew
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu, Debian, Maemo
Posts: 464

Rep: Reputation: 30
Linux is normally installed on a Linux specific file system (there are several to chose from: Ext2/3, Reiserfs, XFS, JFS, etc) but uses a DOS/Windows compatible partition table. It is possible to install Linux in a DOS/Windows file system using a couple of totally different methods (UMSDOS and loopback filesystems) but this usually complicates things instead of making things easier and takes a little performance hit as well.

So it is best to use a native filesystem on it's own partition. Often people need to resize an existing Windows partition to make room for a new Linux one. Fortunately there are good utilities (parted, resizentfs or their GUI front ends like gparted) that do this and are often an automatic step in the built into the install procedure of many Linux distributions.
 
Old 04-01-2005, 10:41 AM   #4
wartstew
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
Distribution: Slackware, Ubuntu, Debian, Maemo
Posts: 464

Rep: Reputation: 30
Oh, and about the "manage files" specifically, you might want to research these native filesystems yourself. Most of the newer ones are journalling so they will always (and quickly) recover from system crashes. Some are better for large files, others for many small files, some talk better with Windows security/permissions, none of them seem to have the file fragmentation problems that the Microsoft files systems do, and all seem (to me anyway) to out perform the Microsoft filesystems in terms of speed especially as the file system gets large.

Linux also has software RAID, is compatible with hardware RAID, and can do other types multi-disk and network distributed file systems.

Linux is often criticized for offering too many choices and confusing people, but those of us that use it love it and mostly laugh at those critics.

Last edited by wartstew; 04-01-2005 at 10:44 AM.
 
Old 04-01-2005, 10:44 AM   #5
ror
Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 583

Rep: Reputation: 33
NTFS doesn't have fragmentation problems :F

And I've never seen anyone criticise linux for having too many choices.
 
Old 04-02-2005, 12:16 PM   #6
XavierP
Moderator
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Kent, England
Distribution: Debian Testing
Posts: 19,192
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475Reputation: 475
Moved: This thread is more suitable in Linux-General and has been moved accordingly to help your thread/question get the exposure it deserves.
 
Old 04-02-2005, 12:22 PM   #7
chbin
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Distribution: slackware-current
Posts: 379

Rep: Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally posted by ror
NTFS doesn't have fragmentation problems :F
dude what planet do you live on? are you kidding with that statement!
 
Old 04-02-2005, 12:25 PM   #8
chbin
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Distribution: slackware-current
Posts: 379

Rep: Reputation: 31
fat32 even out perfoms ntfs.
 
Old 04-02-2005, 05:06 PM   #9
SciYro
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: hopefully not here
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 2,038

Rep: Reputation: 51
Quote:
fat32 even out perfoms ntfs.
how embarrassing ......

also note: Linux has support for around10-20 file system, including all windows FS's (ntfs has read-only support, i don't think its full support tho), hfs/hfs+ (the FS's for MAC's) , Minix (Linux was originally a modification of the Minix kernel ... this FS's is comparable to fat32), amiga file system, various network file system, including coda,nfs, and i forget the rest), CD file systems (ufs (or was it udfs?.... ) for dvd's, and iso9660 for regular cd's) ....... as well as other UNIX FS's like ufs (or was it udfs? .... one of them is for dvd, another that looks just like it is a UNIX FS if i remember right) ....

soo many to list .......... my personal favorite is ReiserFS ... stable, and never corrupted for me. With ReiserFS4, there a plugin system, this will make most other FS's look bad, as the plugins could offer compression/encryption like ntfs does, only do it faster, and more reliably ...... its the one thats best with tons of small files, but its just as good at large files as most other FS's are (if not better)
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Manage ActiveDirectory with Linux-Box arkus Linux - Networking 6 07-23-2004 06:56 AM
Best way to manage the linux file system dibblethewrecke Linux - Software 8 12-02-2003 10:25 AM
How to manage the log files to listen to specific daemons ? cartridge Linux - Software 1 11-08-2003 08:05 AM
Manage multiple linux-machines through one linux-machine howto ? Satriani Linux - Networking 18 06-10-2003 09:54 AM
Manage Linux partitions WITHIN Windows?? troyrogers Linux - General 10 10-27-2002 04:46 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:12 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration