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Old 10-24-2014, 01:38 PM   #1
onebuck
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Thumbs up General Slackware discussion


Hi,

In thread http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...um-4175522985/ post #9 I suggested that a new thread be opened for open general Slackware discussions.

Since <Linux-General>
Quote:
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.
I will open with a quote from PV;
Quote:
Originally Posted by volkerdi View Post
Stang is an old friend, and he'd probably give the idea an OK. But IMHO it is not a good idea. I think some people mistakenly think that there's some close ties between Slackware and the SubGenius, but that's not the case, nor would it be good for marketing in general. They adopted me far more than I adopted them, and it's been years since I've attended an X-Day gathering or seen any of those folks in person. I do personally find a lot of their stuff amusing, but a lot more people find it offensive and this project does not endorse anything that they say or do. Slackware is not intended to be Linux for the SubGenius. It is intended to be Linux for anyone that appreciates the traditional UNIX-like ways of doing things, isn't afraid of the command line, wants the supplied packages to be as unmodified as possible, and likes to be able to expand the system through source code without tossing a wrench into the package manager.
Underlined text above signifies my reasoning for using Slackware GNU/Linux. I have been using Slackware since PV's first release and no regrets. I feel comfortable using 'cli' and great tools to support my installation(s) of Slackware. The Slackware community at the Slackware forum are friendly and helpful to all Slackware GNU/Linux users when possible.

Slackware has really been misunderstood by many GNU/Linux users as a difficult distribution to implement. Not really, we do a have good documentation project that does have many contributors at Slackware Doc Project that can be useful configuration/installation information along with many other Slackware related topics.

I originally started
Slackware®-Links to help provide links to information that would help everyone, not just Slackware links. My intent was to have a central resource of links for all, not just a links bucket.
I also use
Slackware®-Links to help me whenever helping others;
Quote:
"Knowledge is of two kinds. We Know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it."- Samuel Johnson
Plus;
Quote:
"It is one of the most beautiful compensations in life…that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself." - Ralph Waldo Emerson
Have fun & enjoy!

 
Old 10-24-2014, 03:37 PM   #2
mostlyharmless
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Well, OK I'll lob the ball back over the net.

I rather like the quote from volkerdi above, not just the underlined part.

It is interesting that Slackware over the years has generally followed wherever the upstream sources take it with minimal modification; it is one of the closest things there is to a plain "vanilla" Linux. However, whenever new things eg. udev, HAL and now systemd, start becoming part of mainstream Linux, there is an outcry and a countering desire to be conservative and resist, or desire to fork Slackware into some sort of fossilized OS.

In the long run historically I would presume that if everyone adopts something, especially something that Mr Torvalds uses on his development machine, it will end up in Slackware when it becomes unavoidable or stable enough or both.

There are exceptions, notably, package managers, but in some ways, the whole repository/package paradigm flies in the face of being able to use source code not in the repository without messing things up beyond repair... though that isn't always true.
 
Old 10-24-2014, 06:15 PM   #3
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

Yes, PV does have a steady hand with good judgement skills when it comes to additions to Slackware. Personally, the Slackware init system has met my needs to date. Sure we have added HAL that soon was replaced by udev. I really wish this thread to remain a general Slackware discussion so I won't reveal my thoughts on 'systemd'. Slackers have many options available for system/package management today. Not just pkgtool utilities which I still rely on. You can use slackpkg which is very useful;
Quote:
DESCRIPTION
Slackpkg is a tool for those who want to easily install or upgrade packages via the network. With slackpkg, you can have a minimal installation of
Slackware Linux and install/upgrade only those packages you need most.

You don't need to setup NFS or make dozens of CDs for all your computers; all you need to do is to type one command and all of the latest official
Slackware packages will be at your fingertips.
Another good tool would be 'sbopkg';
Quote:
sbopkg - the SlackBuilds.org package browser

SYNOPSIS
sbopkg [options]

DESCRIPTION
Sbopkg is a command-line and dialog-based tool to interact with the SlackBuilds.org (``SBo'') repository, a collection of third-party SlackBuild
scripts to build Slackware packages.
Slackware stability is important to me. I want to have my Gnu/Linux to remain stable without hangups. If I introduce something and have poor results then I know how to revert or crawl back to original stable state. It's nice not having to worry day to day with issues that I know won't crop up unless introduced by my actions or by someone else. I can rely on several members that maintain the repositories.
Slackers have a great support group!

I trust PV & the Slackware team to provide a stable GNU/Linux without worry. I do not always move to new stable releases immediately, I have Laptops that are still using 13.37 & some with 14.0. Sure I maintain security updates to keep things secure & stable. At one point in time I would run '-current' but not doing much with it lately or currently. Pun intended! On my bench systems is where I will utilize stable releases for work & experimentation.

Just to many things on my platter at this time. Selling my farm, remodeling our new home in town. Building a new workshop and developing a whole new LAB for my electronics bench equipment. Being retired, I do not see how everything was getting done before retirement. My task list seems to keep growing, mutating into a monster list. One reason to start hiring other people to do some of the tasks that I would normally have done in the past.

Back on topic! Slackware has been a blessing for me since coming from academia and using UNIX. I am comfortable with Slackware as a UNIX-like GNU/Linux. KISS principle still works for me.

Slack on!
Have fun & enjoy!
 
Old 10-24-2014, 07:03 PM   #4
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mostlyharmless View Post
However, whenever new things eg. udev, HAL and now systemd, start becoming part of mainstream Linux, there is an outcry and a countering desire to be conservative and resist, or desire to fork Slackware into some sort of fossilized OS.
Change is not always good. The general trend is to label people opposed to a change as being opposed to progress. The underlying assumption being that any change that is popular is progress. Some changes are good (progress), some are bad and some have neither benefits nor drawbacks (useless). I doubt most Slack users would oppose a change that would improve the system. They probably would oppose a change that is simply meant to make the system more appealing to the masses.

Following a different course of developement than everyone else does not make a distribution fossilised. It makes it different. Making improvements to a tried and tested system by modifying a solid foundation is not ossification. No more than following every latest trend is progress.

Quote:
In the long run historically I would presume that if everyone adopts something, especially something that Mr Torvalds uses on his development machine, it will end up in Slackware when it becomes unavoidable or stable enough or both.
Dependence on the desires (or whims) of one person is a potentially fatal flaw for all Linux systems.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 10-24-2014, 10:24 PM   #5
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus View Post
Change is not always good. <snip>
Dependence on the desires (or whims) of one person is a potentially fatal flaw for all Linux systems.
I believe depending on PV for a stable Slackware is not fatal nor is it failure since his maintenance of the distribution has a good track record..

As to changes, that would depend on what is in reference instead of a general statement topic. Slackware has evolved from it's first release. Some missteps but changes to the good occurred after some experimentation. Really did not care for hot plugging let alone HAL.
Evolution is good for Slackware and has been since it's inception.

What have you contributed to the community?
 
Old 10-24-2014, 11:10 PM   #6
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
I believe depending on PV for a stable Slackware is not fatal nor is it failure since his maintenance of the distribution has a good track record..
I was referring to Torvalds, not Volkerding. The latter is more trustworthy than the former. Hence, why I stated it is a potential danger to Linux, not just Slackware.

Quote:
What have you contributed to the community?
Other than answering a few questions and providing suggestions and opinions on several fora, nothing.

Last edited by Randicus Draco Albus; 10-24-2014 at 11:13 PM.
 
Old 10-24-2014, 11:45 PM   #7
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

That's fair, I realized that after reading my own response that there had been a misunderstanding.

I was not being smart with the request to 'What have you contributed to the community?'. Open discussions are beneficial and do contribute. Everyone needs to be challenged or things can get dull.
 
Old 10-25-2014, 12:04 AM   #8
Randicus Draco Albus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
I was not being smart with the request to 'What have you contributed to the community?'. Open discussions are beneficial and do contribute. Everyone needs to be challenged or things can get dull.
But I am very sensitive. The thought of missing a meal almost makes me cry.
 
Old 10-31-2014, 09:36 AM   #9
EYo
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BLAST from the past

Hi, and thanks for a place to go off-topic.

Anyone remember the "KDE Everywhere" campaign? My friend worked that summer 2006 at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. She took a Zareason laptop and the KDE logo (Ice breakers in the background). What a relief it was to get the PC specs from Raytheon and see Linux on their list of supported OSes. In fact Tux was the logo on all their luggage tags. That was cool.

But way cool were the balloons! http://science.slashdot.org/story/06/12/21/1328206/ Those were days.
Quote:
Yes, the flight computers still run Slack, and yes, we still use kst for data viewing and analysis.
Cheers to future Slackware and KDE.
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Last edited by EYo; 10-31-2014 at 09:43 AM.
 
  


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