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Old 06-04-2008, 04:00 PM   #1
metallica1973
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Fragmentation Linux vs Windows


I am having trouble understanding why linux doesnt need to be defragemented when we all know that file become displaced in Linux as with Windows.
If that is the case then I am positive that by having fragmented files on your linux machine would decrease the performance. I need some serious clarification on this? If it is need with Linux then can someone recommend a utility?
 
Old 06-04-2008, 04:18 PM   #2
forrestt
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This seems to explain it:

http://geekblog.oneandoneis2.org/ind..._defragmenting

HTH

Forrest
 
Old 06-04-2008, 04:56 PM   #3
Cuetzpallin
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as i know you don't need to defrag under linux FS'

http://geekblog.oneandoneis2.org/ind..._defragmenting
 
Old 06-05-2008, 10:50 AM   #4
H_TeXMeX_H
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lol, I clicked on this like thinking of posting the same link as the two above. It's a good link.

You might also want to use a filesystem that supports extents, note that ext3 doesn't support extents, which makes it more prone to fragmentation, although this should only really happen if you keep the disk near full capacity. If you use a better filesystem either ext4 (now supports extents since kernel 2.6.23), JFS, XFS, reiserfs, fragmentation will not be an issue in nearly every case. It's only primitive filesystems and operating systems such as NTFS and M$ that have big problems with fragmentation.

See the wiki on extents:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extents

Last edited by H_TeXMeX_H; 06-05-2008 at 10:52 AM.
 
Old 06-05-2008, 08:31 PM   #5
metallica1973
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So from what I have read ext4,JFS, and reiser 4 do support this so everything else prior to this doesnt. Ext3 seems to be the norm for the linux file system of choice so why isnt fragmentation need on it? I am confused. Your post are contradicting.

Last edited by metallica1973; 06-06-2008 at 12:44 AM.
 
Old 06-05-2008, 09:23 PM   #6
i92guboj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metallica1973 View Post
So from what I have read ext4,JFS, and reiser 4 do support this so everything else prior to this does. Ext3 seems to be the norm for the linux file system of choice so why isnt fragmentation need on it? I am confused. Your post are contradicting.
Saner filesystems are just a very small piece of the cake.

What really makes a difference is the i/o schedulers. I/O schedulers group and reorder all the operations so the heads don't have to go dancing around forward and backwards over the disk surface. So, the file might be utterly fragmented, but the i/o operations are done always sequentially, regardless. This is why a good i/o scheduler makes fragmentation pointless, unless there's any specific filesystem issue (i.e. reiserfs 3.x suffers greatly from fragmentation) or the fs is completely full.

This is something completely separated and independent of the filesystem, and it's the cause why the performance on linux filesystems doesn't fall drastically when the filesystem is fragmented.
 
  


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