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Old 03-09-2007, 04:32 PM   #1
Shadoglare
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Question Best way to copy image to a DVD-RW and then restore to a new partition?


Well, a quick search of the forums doesn't seem to touch on this really, except for a couple of references about how I should avoid using Ghost I guess..

But anyway - I have PC that dual-boots between Win2K and Ubuntu, right now the 2K partition is about 2/3 of the drive, which I've decided is waaaay too much.
I have an 80Gig HD, and I'm thinking at this point I want to use all but about 10Gig of that for Ubuntu, since about all I use the Win2K for any more is a couple of financial applications I can't get to run under Linux, and even those I will probably find an alternative for soon.

I thought about using something like Partition Magic to shrink down the Win partition, and then afterwards expand the Linux partition into the freed space - however, A) I don't even know if it'll see the linux partition and B) last time I tried to use Partition Magic it completely horked the drive.

What I think would be safer would be to create DVD images of both partitions, reformat & partition, and then restore - but I'm not sure how to go about this - any suggestions?
 
Old 03-09-2007, 09:27 PM   #2
Junior Hacker
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How many partitions do you have and in what order?
 
Old 03-09-2007, 10:45 PM   #3
J.W.
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Have you considered using something like BootIT NG Resizing would probably be simpler than burning and restoring multiple images. Good luck with it
 
Old 03-10-2007, 12:13 AM   #4
syg00
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gparted liveCD is generally recommended for this sort of thing.
There is a sting (or two) in the tail however, as implied by Junior Hacker.
- the Win2k partition had better be first; only move the right (high) boundary.
- growing a Linux partition to the left (i.e. "down") might also be a bit dodgy.

Out of previous experience, with Linux partitions I always resize, re-mkfs, then restore. Then I get what I want, and know it's worked.
Maybe the tools have got better, but I still do it by hand. Something as simple as "cp -a .." or rsync are fine for the backup, although I use external (USB) hard disks.
 
Old 03-10-2007, 12:50 AM   #5
Shadoglare
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Eh, drive's got two partitions, the Win2K one first.

For some reason tonight I got it into my head to try an older version of Partition Magic that I had success with previously... and yeah, it horked my Win2K install. Again. No great loss there though, and it didn't mess up the Linux partition.

I actually discovered gparted while trying to fix the thing, and as it turns out, I was able to do (although half-assed considering I had to reinstall windows after the partition magic destruction) what I wanted with it.

When I reinstalled Windows I deleted the now non-functional partition, and recreated it much smaller than before.
Then after it was installed, booted up the gparted CD, and left-dragged the linux partition to take up the empty space that the first partition was no longer using.

Worked like a charm - made me very happy
 
Old 03-10-2007, 01:37 AM   #6
Junior Hacker
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I was going to recommend either bootitng for the slide or gparted but was not sure how to get grup to find the new position of the Linux /boot sector which is critical for booting Linux. You must have edited the grub.conf or issued a command to get grub to re-build the grub.conf. That is the only part I was not sure of and was a little leary, hence I asked that question.
Maybe gparted took care of that part during the slide.

The biggest difference I see between gparted and bootitng is this grub thing with gparted, and bootitng has the imaging part that I find invaluable.

Last edited by Junior Hacker; 03-10-2007 at 01:39 AM.
 
  


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