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-   -   How to eliminate the compiler tool chain itself after compilation is complete? (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-from-scratch-13/how-to-eliminate-the-compiler-tool-chain-itself-after-compilation-is-complete-454063/)

midiox 06-12-2006 01:30 PM

How to eliminate the compiler tool chain itself after compilation is complete?
 
Look here:
http://www-128.ibm.com/developerwork...xw01BuildLinux
It is written "It is feasible, for instance, to eliminate the compiler tool chain itself after compilation is complete."
Has anyone tried that and how it can be done safely? I need to get rid of gcc and binutils and all the development things without any bad consequences...
Don't ask why, I just need that :)
Thanks

win32sux 06-12-2006 01:40 PM

have you tried "make uninstall" (i haven't)??

in any case, my suggestion would be to use a package system when you get into chapter 6, so that you will have total and easy control over situations like what you are currently facing...

http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/hint...nd_pkg_man.txt

just my :twocents:...

midiox 06-12-2006 01:51 PM

Oh, thanks, good idea! I'll try doing it with some package manager system and then I'll see if it works or I just have screwed all up :) Anyway, interesting experiment...
But what if I try to not to build binutils and GCC at all in chapter 6? I suspect that then all other packages will be dependent on GCC in /tools folder? Are there many such packages that are really dependent on GCC libs at runtime?

win32sux 06-12-2006 02:00 PM

regarding the building of binutils and gcc in chapter 6: i would recommend that you FBBG (follow book, book good)... it's okay to experiment, and in fact it's a vital part of learning, but keep in mind that the people who wrote the book did a fair share of experimenting themselves and what you are reading is part of their results...

another idea about the gcc/binutils package thing: you could install another gcc/binutils copy into a temporary folder (as if like you were creating a package) and then you'll be able to see exactly which files got installed in your system by looking in the temp folder... you would then know exactly which files to eliminate...

of course, this is basically the same as making a package, installing it (letting it replace all your manually installed files), and then removing the package... it's just that by doing it manually you wouldn't have to deal with a package solution at all...


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