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Linux - Embedded & Single-board computer This forum is for the discussion of Linux on both embedded devices and single-board computers (such as the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBoard and PandaBoard). Discussions involving Arduino, plug computers and other micro-controller like devices are also welcome.

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Old 11-10-2011, 08:02 PM   #1
Thesniperofdeath
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low-cost custom ARM board?


Is there manufacturers that make a low-cost ARM board I need 5-10 for testing?I also want the minimal specs. ~1GHz ARMv7 processor,1 fast ethernet port, 1 SDcard slot.
 
Old 11-10-2011, 08:42 PM   #2
macemoneta
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You want a Raspberry Pi:

The first product is about the size of a credit card, and is designed to plug into a TV or be combined with a touch screen for a low cost tablet. The expected price is $25 (model A) or $35 (model B) with Ethernet and 256MB RAM. Run Debian or Fedora, shipping in December:
  • 700MHz Broadcom BCM2835 media processor featuring an ARM11 (ARM1176JZF-S) core, Broadcom GPU core, DSP core and support for Package-on-Package (PoP) RAM
  • 128MiB (Model A) or 256MiB of SDRAM (Model B), stacked on top of the CPU as a PoP device
  • OpenGL ES 2.0
  • 1080p30 H.264 high-profile decode
  • Composite and HDMI video output
  • One USB 2.0 port provided by the BCM2835
  • SD/MMC/SDIO memory card slot
  • General-purpose I/O (About 16 3v3) and various other interfaces, brought out to 1.27mm pin-strip
  • Optional integrated 2-port USB hub and 10/100 Ethernet controller (Model B)
  • Open software (Iceweasel, KOffice, Python)
  • Capability to support various expansion boards
 
Old 11-10-2011, 09:17 PM   #3
Thesniperofdeath
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Any others without USB or GPU?,I want it run with the least power consumption ,and also Raspberry Pi looks great.
 
Old 11-10-2011, 10:05 PM   #4
macemoneta
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The Raspberry Pi runs at 1W when flat out. How low do you want to go?
 
Old 11-10-2011, 10:52 PM   #5
Thesniperofdeath
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Quote:
Model B owners using networking and high-current USB peripherals will require a supply which can source 700mA (many phone chargers meet this requirement).
For model B?If it is then I'll buy it.
 
Old 11-11-2011, 12:01 PM   #6
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Looking around their website, the Raspberry Pi certainly looks pretty awesome! I'm a little surprised at the price point for those specs though - how are they keeping it that cheap? Is it just a margin thing? (lower margins than other manufacturers out there?)
 
Old 11-11-2011, 12:20 PM   #7
macemoneta
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They are a charitable organization. The devices are intended for education, though they recognize that there will be a broad interest from developers as well. The key members are ex-Broadcom employees, and have good industry contacts. I suspect that a lot of the components are being obtained at cost, as a result of the charitable nature and goals of the organization.
 
Old 11-11-2011, 01:48 PM   #8
Thesniperofdeath
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macemoneta View Post
They are a charitable organization. The devices are intended for education, though they recognize that there will be a broad interest from developers as well. The key members are ex-Broadcom employees, and have good industry contacts. I suspect that a lot of the components are being obtained at cost, as a result of the charitable nature and goals of the organization.
I am also confused are the prices based on USD or GBP?I am assume its GBP($25-$35) that they convert to USD(or other currencies)?

Last edited by Thesniperofdeath; 11-11-2011 at 01:52 PM.
 
Old 11-11-2011, 02:02 PM   #9
macemoneta
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In the forums, they mentioned that it's 15GBP or $25USD. They are intended to cost about as much as a textbook, and be cheap enough for children to buy themselves.
 
Old 11-12-2011, 05:40 AM   #10
cnxsoft
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The Raspberry Pi is nice but it's not ARMv7 if that's important to you.
Alternatives are more expensive though. You could use the beaglebone (89 USD) or beagleboard-XM (149 USD) and others. See http://www.linaro.org/low-cost-development-boards/.
 
Old 11-12-2011, 04:58 PM   #11
Thesniperofdeath
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Still looking though their forum, it seems they don't if Model B's Ethernet capabilities will work under device mode(5V micro USB).If under host mode, what power supply unit do you recommend for all the usages(2 USBs, HDMI, Ethernet port)?
 
Old 11-12-2011, 05:26 PM   #12
macemoneta
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If you want to be able to handle 2 USB port at full power (500ma each at 5V) and the Raspberry Pi itself (about 300ma) you'll need a 5v 1300ma supply. On the other hand, if you're just going to stick a couple of thumb drives into the USB ports, you can probably get by with a 500ma supply. If you're using the USB ports for a keyboard and mouse, probably even less than that. The power requirements are a function of what you do with it.
 
Old 11-12-2011, 06:57 PM   #13
Thesniperofdeath
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Originally Posted by macemoneta View Post
If you want to be able to handle 2 USB port at full power (500ma each at 5V) and the Raspberry Pi itself (about 300ma) you'll need a 5v 1300ma supply. On the other hand, if you're just going to stick a couple of thumb drives into the USB ports, you can probably get by with a 500ma supply. If you're using the USB ports for a keyboard and mouse, probably even less than that. The power requirements are a function of what you do with it.
Any way to change it besides mircoUSB?Does it require modifications?
 
Old 11-12-2011, 08:39 PM   #14
macemoneta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thesniperofdeath View Post
Any way to change it besides mircoUSB?Does it require modifications?
Do you mean the charging port? It's microUSB, because that is the most popular, and now the standard for all cell phones. That means that it's cheap, readily available, and you may already have a few extra from old phones.

All this information is available at the site Wiki. Take a little time to read through it.
 
Old 11-13-2011, 01:25 PM   #15
jefro
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They make a ton of those but they are not what I'd call cheap. They are used for machine controls usually. They are a standard unit but it depends on your exact needs to the cost.
 
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