LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Latest LQ Deals
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions
User Name
Password
Linux - Distributions This forum is for Distribution specific questions.
Red Hat, Slackware, Debian, Novell, LFS, Mandriva, Ubuntu, Fedora - the list goes on and on... Note: An (*) indicates there is no official participation from that distribution here at LQ.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-01-2005, 07:10 PM   #1
Cinematography
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Distribution: openSUSE 13.1
Posts: 357

Rep: Reputation: 31
Linux distro with EASY approach to installing programs needed


I'm using Linux Mandrake right now, and I've noticed that I've had to use a lot of command line stuff just to do basic installation operations. Is there a popular and well supported Linux distro that has an easier approach, a GUI panel, or something for installing programs without the 1980s command line stuff?

Last edited by Cinematography; 05-01-2005 at 07:12 PM.
 
Old 05-01-2005, 08:58 PM   #2
freakyg
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: LFS 5.0 and 6.1
Posts: 705

Rep: Reputation: 30
Re: Linux distro with EASY approach to installing programs needed

Quote:
Originally posted by Cinematography
Is there a popular and well supported Linux distro that has an easier approach, a GUI panel, or something for installing programs without the 1980s command line stuff?
the command line IS NOT 1980's stuff!
 
Old 05-01-2005, 09:27 PM   #3
speel
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: queens , nyc
Distribution: Ubuntu MATE
Posts: 352

Rep: Reputation: 30
thats linux for ya take it or leave it :P ( not ment to be sarcastic )
 
Old 05-01-2005, 09:30 PM   #4
piscikeeper
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Pennsylvania USA
Distribution: SuSE
Posts: 427

Rep: Reputation: 30
since mandrake is rpm based i don't think it can get any easier.but you may want to have a look at suse or fedora since these are also rpm based.
and cli is 1980's stuff.........it's just faster and works well.
 
Old 05-01-2005, 10:44 PM   #5
Deeze
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Distribution: Debian - Sarge -- Slackware 10.1 - Dropline
Posts: 154

Rep: Reputation: 30
Try Debian or a deb based distro for a better experience than an rpm based distro. On the cli front, too bad you're biased against that, as it is worlds more convienient to type in a couple short commands than to navigate through the click-n-drool gui... granted, not as easy for a beginner but that does certainly not make it dated, it makes it timeless. All linux distros are text based operating systems. The gui's are, for the most part, simply frontends to the cli commands. This is one of the major reasons Linux is as powerful as it is.
 
Old 05-01-2005, 11:34 PM   #6
reddazz
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: N. E. England
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Debian
Posts: 16,298

Rep: Reputation: 75
Quote:
Try Debian or a deb based distro for a better experience than an rpm based distro
This arguement is getting lame because RPM based distros can use the same tools that Debian uses for package management.

As for Mandrake, you don't have to install packages though the command line, you can install packages using RPMDrake which is the gui frontend to URPMI. On Redhat/Fedora based distros you can use APT with Synaptic as a gui frontend. On Suse, you can use YAST or APT/Snaptic. Personally I think the command line gives you a lot more power than running gui tools, so its essential that you get used to using both.
 
Old 05-01-2005, 11:48 PM   #7
Deeze
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Distribution: Debian - Sarge -- Slackware 10.1 - Dropline
Posts: 154

Rep: Reputation: 30
Think what you will, and yes you can use the same tools to install, but that does not fix the inherent problems in the rpm format. My point is, it's not the package managers fault, it's the fault of the package format itself, and using another package manager, while possible a better solution than the default one, does not fix these flaws... and I'm talking about biggies, such as the ability that .deb gives you to seamlessly upgrade your complete system without a reinstall (something most definetly not recommended using the rpm system, no matter what package manager you use).
 
Old 05-01-2005, 11:53 PM   #8
Cinematography
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Distribution: openSUSE 13.1
Posts: 357

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally posted by Deeze
Try Debian or a deb based distro for a better experience than an rpm based distro. On the cli front, too bad you're biased against that, as it is worlds more convienient to type in a couple short commands than to navigate through the click-n-drool gui... granted, not as easy for a beginner but that does certainly not make it dated, it makes it timeless. All linux distros are text based operating systems. The gui's are, for the most part, simply frontends to the cli commands. This is one of the major reasons Linux is as powerful as it is.
Looking for a button is much easier than looking through a book and trying to memorize command lines. I did this back in the DOS days, and I would much rather not go back to that. GUIs were made so we wouldn't have to worry about command line stuffs.

Thank you all for your suggestions. I will give Fedora and Debian a try later this week.

Quote:
Originally posted by reddazz
This arguement is getting lame because RPM based distros can use the same tools that Debian uses for package management.

As for Mandrake, you don't have to install packages though the command line, you can install packages using RPMDrake which is the gui frontend to URPMI. On Redhat/Fedora based distros you can use APT with Synaptic as a gui frontend. On Suse, you can use YAST or APT/Snaptic. Personally I think the command line gives you a lot more power than running gui tools, so its essential that you get used to using both.
Thanks a lot! Maybe I could just try RPMDrake. Hopefully its a package I can find on my DVD.

Last edited by Cinematography; 05-01-2005 at 11:57 PM.
 
Old 05-02-2005, 12:13 AM   #9
Deeze
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Distribution: Debian - Sarge -- Slackware 10.1 - Dropline
Posts: 154

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Cinematography
Looking for a button is much easier than looking through a book and trying to memorize command lines.

Sorry, I should have been more clear about the Synaptic front end that comes with most deb based distros.

On the other hand, once you have a couple of commands down, it's so much easier, and faster, to type in, for instance, apt-get update && apt-get upgrade, or apt-get distro-upgrade, than to open an app and navigate through it via mouse to do the same task.

Last edited by Deeze; 05-02-2005 at 12:19 AM.
 
Old 05-02-2005, 01:37 AM   #10
Cinematography
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Distribution: openSUSE 13.1
Posts: 357

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally posted by Deeze
Sorry, I should have been more clear about the Synaptic front end that comes with most deb based distros.

On the other hand, once you have a couple of commands down, it's so much easier, and faster, to type in, for instance, apt-get update && apt-get upgrade, or apt-get distro-upgrade, than to open an app and navigate through it via mouse to do the same task.
Thank you for clarifying.

Is there a site somewhere with all of these command lines listed?
 
Old 05-02-2005, 08:33 AM   #11
Deeze
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2004
Distribution: Debian - Sarge -- Slackware 10.1 - Dropline
Posts: 154

Rep: Reputation: 30
The best way to find out the usage of commands is to google for a howto. I know the main problem with this is simply knowing what command you're looking for to start with, but we can help with that .

Here is the apt howto. Don't let it's size scare you, just pick a place in the index you're interested in and start reading, then when and if you feel like it, you can dig in as deep as you want.

Some users will tell you to read the man page (man is short for manual), but that documentation is sometimes a bit chewy for the begginer. Howtos usually are written in a way that's a bit easier to read.

There is a large list of howtos here and skimming through it might give you some insight into other commands you might find useful. Most of the info there is not distro specific, and if you find something of interest that doesn't seem to fit the way your distro works you might be able to find something that works better. I see many posts by people that try to install things, and come asking why doesn't this compile, why can't I make this install script work, etc.. etc.. when the package they are trying to install is available natively for their distro and a much easier way to install is availble for them, they just did not understand the way their package manager works. A prime example of how somebody could get confused happened to me just in the last couple days, a friend told me about a mysql admin tool (Query browser.. does this look yummy or what?) , and pointed me to the web page, I looked and only saw rpms and source, but was a bit busy and didn't think it through so thought I'd probably have to install from source so skipped it for the time being, but later in the day I took a minute and looked in the Debian repository, and there it was, just waiting to be installed with no hassle.

Last edited by Deeze; 05-02-2005 at 08:54 AM.
 
Old 05-02-2005, 09:10 AM   #12
reddazz
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: N. E. England
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Debian
Posts: 16,298

Rep: Reputation: 75
Use the manual pages installed by the programs. For example to find out more about APT, you could do "man apt" in a console and you would get information about APT.
 
Old 05-02-2005, 09:57 AM   #13
jdruin
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Louisville aka Derby City
Distribution: WinXP SP2 and SP3, W2K Server, Ubuntu
Posts: 313

Rep: Reputation: 30
Xandros is the easiest I have seen. It has a propriatary program that acts like Windows Update and it is Debian based so apt-get works as well. Xandros 3 is available as a free download right now.
 
Old 05-02-2005, 12:01 PM   #14
Padma
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Omaha, NE, USA
Distribution: PCLinuxOS 2007
Posts: 808

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Cinematography
Thanks a lot! Maybe I could just try RPMDrake. Hopefully its a package I can find on my DVD.
Unless you explicitely removed it from the installation process, it is installed. From the task bar: click Star --> System --> Configuration --> Configure Your Computer. Enter your root password when prompted. In the window that comes up, select "Software Management" in the left panel. You are now in rpmdrake.
 
Old 05-03-2005, 07:14 AM   #15
Cinematography
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Distribution: openSUSE 13.1
Posts: 357

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 31
Thank a lot folks for your help!

And strangely, I've been using RPMDrake since I first installed Linux without realizing it. There have been other programs where I had to use command line, or a icon wouldn't appear anywhere. Firefox is one example. It's probably the fault of the people who made the program though. Anyhow.

Thanks again!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for a lightweight, easy-to-use Linux distro Gary King Linux - Distributions 4 08-18-2005 03:20 AM
Linux Programs and Files: accessible by any installed distro? hanzj Linux - Newbie 10 04-19-2005 07:46 AM
Best approach to learning Linux vharishankar General 15 11-09-2004 02:29 AM
Installing gui programs (any distro I guess) ch424 Linux - Software 2 10-03-2004 11:18 AM
An interesting newbie approach to Linux Punkie Linux - Newbie 14 07-22-2003 01:44 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:26 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration