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Old 09-17-2009, 11:20 AM   #31
prushik
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Also, su, is not a real root login.
 
Old 09-17-2009, 11:41 AM   #32
repo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouArnold View Post
Just as an update:
I'll be trying CentOS V5.3. Here is some text from the centos.org web page. Let's hope their claims are real.

"CentOS is an Enterprise Linux distribution based on the freely available sources from Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Each CentOS version is supported for 7 years (by means of security updates). A new CentOS version is released every 2 years and each CentOS version is periodically updated (roughly every 6 months) to support newer hardware. This results in a secure, low-maintenance, reliable, predictable and reproducible Linux environment."

Regards,
Lou.
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...os-5.2-755942/
 
Old 09-17-2009, 11:45 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prushik View Post
Also, su, is not a real root login.
Correct,

The "su" command is a "switch user" command. In its simplest form, typing "su" will prompt you for the root password and if given correctly you get root privileges. Typing "su -" and giving the correct password gives you root's privileges and environment
 
Old 09-17-2009, 08:13 PM   #34
MBybee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by repo View Post
Correct,

The "su" command is a "switch user" command. In its simplest form, typing "su" will prompt you for the root password and if given correctly you get root privileges. Typing "su -" and giving the correct password gives you root's privileges and environment
I would say the difference between su and an actual login are irrelevant to this discussion, since a distro with root disabled won't allow either. Not to be confused with sudo, which only lets you act as root. I did a full tty login as root on the console just to be sure.

As far as a root login to Gnome, that's just a gdm config setting. Easy to change, and I believe both KDE and Gnome are both moving towards this default.
 
Old 09-18-2009, 01:16 AM   #35
repo
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Quote:
I would say the difference between su and an actual login are irrelevant to this discussion, since a distro with root disabled won't allow either
The problem is that root is not allowed to login in gdm or kdm, not that root is disabled.
 
Old 09-18-2009, 08:16 AM   #36
prushik
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You could always say "sudo -i" or "exec sudo bash", thats more or less the equivalent of su.
In GDM you can enable root logins in the options window, you just need to root password to do it.
 
Old 09-18-2009, 03:10 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by repo View Post
The problem is that root is not allowed to login in gdm or kdm, not that root is disabled.
Just edit the config file - use sudo or whatever. Really, it's not that complicated - just complicated enough to keep people who don't know better from logging in to X as root and browsing the web or whatever.

I really don't see the point of the fuss - this is not a big deal.

Look:
1) If you want to enable root login on a distro where it is disabled, typically you just need to set the password, and optionally tweak some config files. (distro specific - use google or whatever)
2) If you want to log in to X as root, just tweak the config file

Why is this such a big deal? If you have any business running as root, you are smart enough to learn this easily. One quick web search is all you really need. If you can't figure that, may I suggest you just accept that the support communities have decided there is a reason why it's disabled?
 
Old 09-19-2009, 11:41 AM   #38
shorty_boy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MBybee View Post
...Why is this such a big deal? If you have any business running as root, you are smart enough to learn this easily. One quick web search is all you really need. If you can't figure that, may I suggest you just accept that the support communities have decided there is a reason why it's disabled?
Agreed. I have had many late night calls from friends who have trashed their systems because of logging in as root (Graphical) and treating it as if it is a regular account. Then they ask me to fix it and when I tell them that, "You need to reload your box because I cannot figure out what you did, or you removed some important config files..." I get the, "Linux sucks and will never be better than windows if it breaks that easily..."

I understand that the OP wants to have the ability to login as root, it is handy sometimes and I use to do it c2003 for installing ATI drivers and compiling Kernels. But do keep in mind, there are many ways to get root privileges in graphical as a regular user. You can always su or sudo an application to bring it up as root (to edit config files, move root only files, etc.)

For example, If I wanted to edit my xorg.config file I do this

Code:
tenoki@Betsy:~$ su
パスワード:
Betsy:/home/tenoki# gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf
and then viola. IT may give some complaints about authentication and stuff in the terminal or warnings to you but it does work if you need it.

I understand this is also a personal preference, but I feel that you are limiting yourself from some good distros because of this trivial issue that can be fixed with a few lines in a config file or from GDM/KDM directly.
 
Old 09-19-2009, 12:48 PM   #39
lwasserm
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Someone who cannot figure out how to enable root login on a system is probably not ready to be using it yet.
 
Old 09-19-2009, 02:38 PM   #40
prushik
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You can easily enable X root logins without manually editing the config files (That is, if you are using gdm, I've never used kdm or xdm). All you have to do is click options or settings or whatever, and go to the last tab, I forget what its called, and check "Allow administrator login" or something along those lines. And of course give the root password.
 
Old 09-21-2009, 02:02 PM   #41
LouArnold
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouArnold View Post
Just as an update:
I'll be trying CentOS V5.3. Here is some text from the centos.org web page. Let's hope their claims are real.

"CentOS is an Enterprise Linux distribution based on the freely available sources from Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Each CentOS version is supported for 7 years (by means of security updates). A new CentOS version is released every 2 years and each CentOS version is periodically updated (roughly every 6 months) to support newer hardware. This results in a secure, low-maintenance, reliable, predictable and reproducible Linux environment."

Regards,
Lou.
I've confirmed it: CentOS V5.3 allows root login via the login GUI (X). And I can use the configuration GUIs as root to stop, start and restart services. I can even set up Samba from the GUI. Man, that feels so good!

Many thanks to all.
Lou.
 
  


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