LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions
User Name
Password
Linux - Distributions This forum is for Distribution specific questions.
Red Hat, Slackware, Debian, Novell, LFS, Mandriva, Ubuntu, Fedora - the list goes on and on... Note: An (*) indicates there is no official participation from that distribution here at LQ.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-28-2018, 12:53 PM   #1
davide445
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2018
Distribution: KDE Neon
Posts: 73

Rep: Reputation: 1
Choose a distribution for data science and Linux newbie


Hi all
with a new PC coming I'll install also a Linux distribution. My only experience with Linux was a 20 years ago, and I dislike the Gnome experience at the time. Never used again. Not used to CLI, I'm more a curious person than a technician.

Will be used for prototyping and not development (not a developer myself), so to evaluate data science / ML packages, frameworks, skills needed, potentialities, planning product features.

The hw will be a Ryzen CPU (2600X), and possibly a double GPU with old AMD HD 7950 Boost for graphics + Nvidia GTX 1070 for compute, 32GB RAM. I can use also only a single GPU if too complex.

Linux will be installed on a second SSD, with the first SSD having Win10 from my old PC. A NTFS HDD will be shared btw Win10 and Linux with data.

Will use containers (such as Docker) for testing in Linux, 3D graphics probably on Windows, Python for prototyping using various frameworks.

Ubuntu appear to be a logical choice since supported from all the app and frameworks I'm looking about.

Having maintained my bad taste for Gnome I'll like to try a different DE, with the best possible experience in term of easiness to use, modern look and feel, compatibility with hw and sw, support.

Coming down in my research I was coming to consider these options:
- Kubuntu (like it but appear to be in descending adoption, also dubious about the support, easiness to install different applications, compatibility with GPUs)
- Linux Minit (didn't like so much the Cinnamon DE, dubious if being "derivate" from Ubuntu mean is less compatible with the various hw and sw, but widely used and appear to be newbie friendly)
- Ubuntu Budgie (like the DE, less consolidated respect the others, didn't find any adoption among data science practitioners, dubious about support and compatibility)

So pretty a lot of doubts, after looking at various specific distro forums I decided was the case to ask the broader Linux experts and users community.
 
Old 12-29-2018, 12:21 PM   #2
ehartman
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Delft, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 952

Rep: Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496
Quote:
Originally Posted by davide445 View Post
So pretty a lot of doubts, after looking at various specific distro forums I decided was the case to ask the broader Linux experts and users community.
Just by the name, and the RHEL parenthood (one of the most supported distributions in scientific environments), have a look at Scientific Linux.
www.scientificlinux.org/
Yes, it will have Gnome as default DE, but several others are available and supported like the pure Windows Manager IceWM, but the full KDE Plasma one too.

PS: I have no experience with this distro, but did work with both RHEL and CentOS, another RHEL ofshoot.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-29-2018, 12:45 PM   #3
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth? I would say I hope so but I'm not so sure about that... I could just be a figment of your imagination too.
Distribution: Currently OpenMandriva. Previously openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,076

Rep: Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576
Given your requirements, what you suggested so far, as well as what's been suggested above, you could also have a look at openSUSE.

While Linux Mint, Ubuntu, etc maybe a little more "beginner friendly", openSUSE isn't unfriendly towards people new to Linux. It's a kind of middle-of-the-road distribution if you will. I used it myself for a number of years. I think the biggest advantage for you with that is that, you will get a choice of graphical environments when you install it - it's installer/"control panel" YaST will ask you during it's installation which graphical environment you want to install, and you can easily configure it with YaST after installation. There is a wide variety of software packages available for it as well.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-29-2018, 12:46 PM   #4
davide445
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2018
Distribution: KDE Neon
Posts: 73

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
@ehartman

@jsbjsb001

Thanks for answering. I was looking at ScientificLinux, but being based on RedHat I didn't consider it in the first place. Same for OpenSuse.
All the programs I'm looking for support Ubuntu LTS so as beginner I consider safer to focus on Ubuntu or Ubuntu derived distro.
What about the one I listed.
Or in fact any distro can execute any package? It's all a bit confusing for a newbie.

Last edited by davide445; 12-29-2018 at 12:55 PM.
 
Old 12-29-2018, 01:01 PM   #5
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth? I would say I hope so but I'm not so sure about that... I could just be a figment of your imagination too.
Distribution: Currently OpenMandriva. Previously openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,076

Rep: Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576
Well, basically in terms of software packages, just because one distribution uses the same type of package, it doesn't mean it will work on another distribution. Basically it depends on the dependencies involved, eg package A depends on package B, and so on and so forth to work.

You're best sticking to packages built for the distribution you're using. But that said, you can install Ubuntu packages on Linux Mint - Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu. But a package built for Red Hat Linux would very likely break openSUSE, because Red Hat Linux packages have not been built for openSUSE.

I won't confuse you anymore than that.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-29-2018, 01:59 PM   #6
davide445
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2018
Distribution: KDE Neon
Posts: 73

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Thanks @jsbjsb001
And what about Desktop Environment?
I've tested the various distro on VM and I appreciate the cleaniness of KDE, but didn't understand if also this is meaning I will be able to use correctly only app made for KDE or also Gnome app.
Reading and reading appear also KDE is slowly fading in term of support, so I might be ending in a dead end?
 
Old 12-29-2018, 02:07 PM   #7
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth? I would say I hope so but I'm not so sure about that... I could just be a figment of your imagination too.
Distribution: Currently OpenMandriva. Previously openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,076

Rep: Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576
No, you can use any graphical apps - it doesn't matter which desktop environment you install. But for KDE apps to work, you'll need the kdelibs installed. Which they will be if you're using the KDE desktop environment (which I use myself as it happens). This is where your package manager comes in; it should sort out which dependencies you need and offer to install them automatically for you.

KDE is far from dead, the latest version of it is KDE 5.x (where "x" is the latest minor version available).
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-29-2018, 02:42 PM   #8
davide445
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2018
Distribution: KDE Neon
Posts: 73

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Thanks again @jsbjsb001 (btw no way to cite a person without quoting his post?).
Just testing KDE Neon on VM, as newbie can I expect problems, or just the same as Kubuntu.
Also really important, about hardware compatibility (GPUs mostly) might I expect better/worse support based on the distributions (I did say the choice is narrowed down to KDE Neon/Kubuntu or Linux Mint).
 
Old 12-29-2018, 02:45 PM   #9
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth? I would say I hope so but I'm not so sure about that... I could just be a figment of your imagination too.
Distribution: Currently OpenMandriva. Previously openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,076

Rep: Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576
You can cite a post, quite easily, just write something like "post #x" (where "x" is the post number you want to cite), if you don't want to quote it. Or you could just quote the relevant part of whatever post it is.
 
Old 12-29-2018, 02:53 PM   #10
davide445
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2018
Distribution: KDE Neon
Posts: 73

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Just testing KDE Neon on VM, as newbie can I expect problems, or just the same as Kubuntu?
Also really important, about hardware compatibility (GPUs mostly) might I expect better/worse support based on the distributions (I did say the choice is narrowed down to KDE Neon/Kubuntu or Linux Mint)?
 
Old 12-29-2018, 02:59 PM   #11
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth? I would say I hope so but I'm not so sure about that... I could just be a figment of your imagination too.
Distribution: Currently OpenMandriva. Previously openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,076

Rep: Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576
A VM isn't really going to give you much idea about hardware support - you should try a "live system" for that, that will give you the best idea about that.

You should have a look at this as well - it will give you a good idea about software packages, etc.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-29-2018, 03:24 PM   #12
davide445
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2018
Distribution: KDE Neon
Posts: 73

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 1
Ok creating the bootable usb right now with KDE Neon, will test it and the others soon on the old PC with the new GPU arrived yesterday, the other new PC components will need to wait a bit more.
 
Old 12-29-2018, 08:26 PM   #13
ehartman
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Delft, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 952

Rep: Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
KDE is far from dead, the latest version of it is KDE 5.x (where "x" is the latest minor version available).
Actually "KDE 5" has been split into three:
Code:
KDE Applications 18.12
KDE Frameworks 5.53.0
and the desktop
KDE Plasma 5.14.4
(latest release announcements from www.kde.org)
and only the latter two thus carry a 5.x number.
 
Old 12-29-2018, 08:41 PM   #14
ehartman
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Delft, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 952

Rep: Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496Reputation: 496
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
because Red Hat Linux packages have not been built for openSUSE.
But lots of firms deliver rpm's that will work on both Red Hat (and CentOS/Scientific Linux) and SLE (including openSUSE Leap).

Then: openSUSE has the
Code:
Open Build Service (OBS)

Our Build service has tools to build packages, available for SUSE Linux Enterprise, Arch, Debian, Fedora, Scientific Linux, RHEL, CentOS
and Debian is the root (base) for all flavors of ubuntu, Linux Mint etc
(and for rpm based distro's they forgot to mention Mandriva/Mageia).

BTW for the OP: Fedora is the open source development version for RHEL, community supported and mostly MUCH in advance of RHEL, which goes for stability (10 years of support) and not the newest/latest stuff.
 
Old 12-30-2018, 12:07 AM   #15
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth? I would say I hope so but I'm not so sure about that... I could just be a figment of your imagination too.
Distribution: Currently OpenMandriva. Previously openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,076

Rep: Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576Reputation: 1576
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
Actually "KDE 5" has been split into three:
Code:
KDE Applications 18.12
KDE Frameworks 5.53.0
and the desktop
KDE Plasma 5.14.4
(latest release announcements from www.kde.org)
and only the latter two thus carry a 5.x number.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
But lots of firms deliver rpm's that will work on both Red Hat (and CentOS/Scientific Linux) and SLE (including openSUSE Leap).

Then: openSUSE has the
Code:
Open Build Service (OBS)

Our Build service has tools to build packages, available for SUSE Linux Enterprise, Arch, Debian, Fedora, Scientific Linux, RHEL, CentOS
and Debian is the root (base) for all flavors of ubuntu, Linux Mint etc
(and for rpm based distro's they forgot to mention Mandriva/Mageia).

BTW for the OP: Fedora is the open source development version for RHEL, community supported and mostly MUCH in advance of RHEL, which goes for stability (10 years of support) and not the newest/latest stuff.
ehartman, I never said that KDE hasn't been split into three, I was talking about the desktop environment it's very self, which I would have thought would have been clear. The OP had already stated they were getting confused, I had already stated that I didn't wish to confuse them anymore than what they already were.

I was talking about packages built by Red Hat Linux them-very-selves, not packages built by third party vendors. As I clearly stated before, I used openSUSE for a number of years. I therefore know that openSUSE has their OBS repo's.

Can you please consider the OP - you don't need to be pedantic - it doesn't help someone who is new to Linux, and you are only telling me what I already know - the OP has clearly shown that they have done research and can ask the question if they are not sure about something. Please start considering the OP, please.

You also need to direct your responses towards the OP, instead of other members - I'm not the OP asking the question to begin with...

Last edited by jsbjsb001; 12-30-2018 at 12:51 AM. Reason: made post more clear and an addition.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Python libraries for data science, Linux firewalls, Raspberry Pi NAS, openmediavault, Syncthing, microservices, and more LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-25-2018 12:21 AM
LXer: The Apache Software Foundation's Two New Big Data Projects Tackle Science and Processing LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 07-26-2016 05:00 PM
LXer: A Linux distribution for science geeks LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 06-20-2014 10:32 AM
(newbie) distribution to choose... nistelrooy Linux - Distributions 7 10-09-2003 05:17 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:26 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration