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Old 03-03-2019, 07:04 PM   #16
Sofia-M
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Distribution: Debian Testing SliTaz
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Hello Sidzen,

Slackware was the first Linux I ever used, and I liked it very much.
It is very simple, versatile, efficient and would be very much my ideal distro but for the packages being a bit outdated for my present needs.
As a matter of fact (someone might correct me if I'm wrong as I often am), I don't know of any distro which is simple like Slackware and au pair with say Debian testing or Arch Linux in terms of repository.
Your setup reminds me of my usual procedure, getting total rid of Windows and related stuff being my first step when I get a new machine.
I also suscribe to your feelings about EFI and GPT being nuisances.
I'm going to check out Porteus, also because I'm a sucker for vintage stuff.

Best wishes to you too.
 
Old 03-04-2019, 06:04 AM   #17
hazel
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Crux is quite like Slackware, but it's source-based so you spend quite a lot of time watching stuff compile.

If you find Slackware outdated, why not try Slackware-current?
 
Old 03-04-2019, 07:25 AM   #18
sevendogsbsd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sofia-M View Post
From a user perspective, what are the main differences between NetBSD, FreeBSD, and OpenBSD in terms of practical use and performance?
My apologies, I unsubscribed from this thread and missed this. So, I have only installed NetBSD in a VM so can't speak to practical performance or use. OpenBSD seems to work well on laptops because I see a lot of people using it there. My experience was not good with OpenBSD on my PC because of 2 things: graphical performance on my 4k monitor was bad, and OpenBSD only supports a single block device during the install. I have multiple SSDs and was unable to use more than one during the install.

My favorite BSD is FreeBSD. Performance is great, but it takes a bit of work to get a desktop up. I can do a bare metal install of FreeBSD (no desktop) in around 10 minutes so it's easy to install, at least in my opinion. I use FreeBSD as a daily desktop and it works very well for me.
 
Old 03-04-2019, 02:13 PM   #19
Sofia-M
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Hazel,

strangely I hadn't considered Slackware-current. That's a good tip.

Sevendogsbsd,

Yes, for all I have read, FreeBSD seems like the most viable option.
 
Old 03-04-2019, 04:13 PM   #20
rokytnji
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Quote:
Beyond debian
https://wiki.debian.org/DebianExperimental

Quote:
You have been warned
Just

Quote:
shooting just the bull, OK?
My BSD sessions were laughable with my ineptness. They renamed all the rooms in my house and then changed directions on how to get to em. Worked on it and worked on it till.

Quote:
AwSnap
Greeted me on bootup screen. Instead of login.

Have fun with it. If it aint fun. What's the point? Now off for a pint.
 
Old 03-07-2019, 01:22 PM   #21
Sofia-M
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Rokytnji,

yep, just reading the install how to on FreeBSD makes installing Gentoo look like a snap.
Like you say, the change of terminolgy is confusing, harder than learn something from scratch.
Challenging but certainly worth trying.
Last night, tested Void Linux musl, which has an amazing selection of packages, some of them even working, LOL
 
Old 03-07-2019, 02:02 PM   #22
sevendogsbsd
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FreeBSD installer is drop dead simple - I can install FreeBSD in < 10 minutes. It takes about 3 hours for me to install Gentoo and get a bootable system.

Terminology change can be significant, yes, because FreeBSD is not Linux. The long pole in FreeBSD is getting a desktop configured but in my experience, is not any more difficult than Slackware. Having said that, I do have experience so for the uninitiated, it will certainly take longer.

Void is pretty darn nice actually, and it would certainly be a contender if I ran Linux again. My only issue with it is the team is tiny. They had to recover from their "leader" going AWOL and move hosting for repos, etc, but they were able to do that so are back up and running.
 
Old 03-11-2019, 01:59 PM   #23
black-clover
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Adelie Linux might be exotic enough for you.
 
Old 03-14-2019, 09:41 PM   #24
Sofia-M
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Adelie Linux seems like an interesting concept.
musl is becoming popular.
 
Old 03-15-2019, 02:29 PM   #25
273
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Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
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Did I mention Sid? It's worked for me (with caveats) for about 15 years on a few machines.
 
Old 03-20-2019, 12:00 PM   #26
Sofia-M
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Hello 273,

I have never used Sid. There are at times some packages in Sid which I might like to see in Testing, but I have never considered the switch.
 
  


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