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Linux - Containers This forum is for the discussion of all topics relating to Linux containers. Docker, LXC, LXD, runC, containerd, CoreOS, Kubernetes, Mesos, rkt, and all other Linux container platforms are welcome.

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Old 12-28-2017, 03:29 AM   #1
katana9988
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Question Is kubernetes enough for my need? or too much?


Hi guys. My question here is for the experience people. I am planning to open a new website. For the beginning, I can go with 2 Ubuntu servers one is database and another is the web server.

But learning about fail safe, load balancing & other stuff. I am targeting Docker for my requirement and to be managed kubernetes.

My Question is. For a new website while may take time to be recognized and take time for people to know about. Is what I am thinking is overkill? Yes. I wouldn't expect much issues in the beginning but it is good to be safe and ready than sorry? I am thinking of making a small kubernetes system (that can manage 2 docker webservers & 2 docker databases) and scale gradually as need.

So to make things simple. I to build the website foundation from now to be ready for almost anything.


Note:
  • I will be using a cloud based solution like AWS or digitalocean.
  • What I decide now is important for me so I can start learning docker and kubernetes.


Please advice me and I am open to any ideas.

Thanks a lot.
 
Old 12-28-2017, 07:55 AM   #2
sundialsvcs
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These days, I would seriously look at container-based cloud hosting services, and not fool around with "my own hardware" at all. Literally everybody hosts a scalable LAMP solution, and they hit all the usual service-levels and corresponding price-points, including "hobbyist."

To me, the entire point of using container technology is the ease with which you can add or remove them: an easy thing to do, after all, since "a container is an illusion." The hosting companies buy b-i-g, f-a-s-t hardware, and you just go along for the ride. You don't have to worry about the iron, or the container software infrastructure. You simply buy an enforceable service-level agreement contract.

I do suggest that you should purchase a known quantity of service each month instead of "pay as you go," but maybe that's just me.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 12-28-2017 at 08:13 AM.
 
Old 12-28-2017, 04:06 PM   #3
Habitual
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I'd learn the "candlestick method" of Docker first. (by hand, manually).
If you rely on kupernetes to mange it and that breaks or goes South, you'll not be in a bind.

Some inspiration:
Five minute Wordpress in a Docker container.

You may be over thinking it a little.

and https://docs.docker.com/get-started/

I'd learn "locally" and then later decide if an added expense is necessary.

Just sayin'
 
Old 12-29-2017, 08:12 AM   #4
sundialsvcs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habitual View Post
I'd learn "locally" and then later decide if an added expense is necessary.

Just sayin'
I definitely agree: containers (and Kuberantes) are easy to obtain and easy to set up. If you think you're going to want to go this route, as I suggest, then you can – and should – thoroughly familiarize yourself with it first, and run your local development system in a containerized environment.

While it is unlikely that you would need KB to run your development box(es), you can do more than just kick the tires.

Quite a few hosting companies make it a point to say that everything which runs their service is public and open-source ... that the only thing they provide is great customer-service, backbone networks, physical security and kick-ass iron. Therefore, you can create in your test environment an exact replica, and even scale it up-and-down. You can mimic everything that you will encounter when you "go live."

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 12-29-2017 at 08:15 AM.
 
  


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