LinuxQuestions.org
Visit the LQ Articles and Editorials section
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General > Linux - Certification
User Name
Password
Linux - Certification This forum is for the discussion of all topics relating to Linux certification.

Notices


Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 12-18-2012, 08:57 AM   #1
mohajuice
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2012
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
You must be a good system administrator before being a network administrator.


Someone told me that before going to be a network administrator you must be good at system administration is it true? please guide me i have planned to make career in networking.
 
Old 12-18-2012, 09:27 AM   #2
acid_kewpie
Moderator
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: UK
Distribution: Gentoo, RHEL, Fedora, Centos
Posts: 43,415

Rep: Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970
erm no. I would suggest the opposite is more true. If you are a sysadmin who hasn't got a clue what's happening past your NIC, you're going to do a bad job. Other way round, it's much less critical.

Did you have any examples of why sysadmin knowledge helps? That's GOT to be OS agnostic by definition, so isn't able to go too far down the stack.

The only grey area that springs to mind is something like how FTP works, with it's archaic port operations, but again that's something a sysadmin is less likely to know that a netadmin.

Last edited by acid_kewpie; 12-18-2012 at 09:29 AM.
 
Old 12-18-2012, 09:32 AM   #3
MensaWater
Guru
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Atlanta Georgia USA
Distribution: Redhat (RHEL), CentOS, Fedora, Debian, FreeBSD, HP-UX, Solaris, SCO
Posts: 6,088
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802
As a network Engineer you often have to troubleshoot networking issues that affect hosts. However if the organization has System Administrators you're not going to be allowed to access the hosts directly.

Having said that however most switches, firewalls and other networking appliances you might deal with (e.g. F5 BigIP) do have operating systems of their own on them and you'll likely need to know those well. Many of these are either embedded Linux or something that looks and acts a lot like Linux. Since these are almost always customized though general Systems Administration won't necessarily help you more than learning the specific administration for those devices.

All in all I'd disagree with the statement you heard but will say that knowing System Administration likely would be helpful in learning the other stuff. Many commands used in UNIX/Linux such as tcpdump, netstat, netcat etc... are also available on networking devices or are needed to externally monitor things.
 
Old 12-19-2012, 02:13 AM   #4
mohajuice
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2012
Posts: 6

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
@acid_kewpie -- how could one understand networking concepts without knowing enough system concepts. as far as my reading goes, the first three layers of a IP protocol stack gets implemented in a software so I think and believe that knowing and understanding systems comes first then comes a network.

@MensaWater -- which one of these two fields, networking and sysadministration is more chanllenging and demanding.

---------- Post added 12-19-12 at 01:44 PM ----------

@acid_kewpie -- how could one understand networking concepts without knowing enough system concepts. as far as my reading goes, the first three layers of a IP protocol stack gets implemented in a software so I think and believe that knowing and understanding systems comes first then comes a network.

@MensaWater -- which one of these two fields, networking and sysadministration is more chanllenging and demanding.
 
Old 12-19-2012, 02:40 AM   #5
acid_kewpie
Moderator
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: UK
Distribution: Gentoo, RHEL, Fedora, Centos
Posts: 43,415

Rep: Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970Reputation: 1970
Can you provide an example?

As I commented on above, FTP is the best example I can think of, but I learned about FTP data flows when I did my CCNA, not RHCE.

Sure parts of the stack are done in software, but they're coded to existing RFC's that are also implemented in network devices, and are really only knowledge for network admins. As much as you have read something that has stuck in your mind, if you can't provide any examples, I don't see how you can defend this position.

In terms of what is more challenging, it really depends how deep you want to go into it. Network administration is potentially broader, and more theoretical at times. You could get a CCIE one day and be designing international MPLS / BGP WANs. Sysadmin, when based within it's own confines, is generally much more likely to be a simpler thing, dealing with more things in a day, but each tending more towards the simple side of theory. At the other end of the spectrum though, neither a network admin plugging cables into switches and a sysadmin rebooting windows boxes require much intellect or cross tech knowledge.

Last edited by acid_kewpie; 12-19-2012 at 02:43 AM.
 
Old 01-03-2013, 12:46 PM   #6
MensaWater
Guru
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Atlanta Georgia USA
Distribution: Redhat (RHEL), CentOS, Fedora, Debian, FreeBSD, HP-UX, Solaris, SCO
Posts: 6,088
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802Reputation: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by mohajuice View Post
@MensaWater -- which one of these two fields, networking and sysadministration is more chanllenging and demanding.[COLOR="Silver"]
I'm a system admin rather than a network engineer and I find it challenging and demanding enough for a host (pun intended) of reasons. However looking at it from the outside it seems to me that Networking is probably more demanding and challenging. With systems you might take out key functions important to the entire organization by accident but you're usually going to be troubleshooting the actual issue on a single system (or cluster at worst) whereas with networking you can take out the entire organization by simply having things be globally inaccessible.

Both roles suffer a common issue: What you do sits below much of what everyone else does and people are apt to blame the lowest common denominator rather than troubleshooting their own area. Since networking sits below systems Network Engineers probably get more of this from Sys Admins whereas Sys Admins get more of this from Application/Database folks but the latter are just as apt to blame networking as the OS.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wanted: System/Network administrator. all levels at Cambridge, MA, USA nvitaly LQ Job Marketplace [Archive] 10 05-27-2011 05:29 AM
Technical Requirement for Linux Network Engineer and System Administrator c_parapat Linux - Networking 1 03-23-2010 08:10 AM
LXer: How to be a good (and lazy) System Administrator LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 06-02-2008 10:00 PM
Need a good network administrator for Mandrake 9.2 Danno13 Linux - Networking 5 10-21-2003 04:08 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:06 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration