LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General > Linux - Certification
User Name
Password
Linux - Certification This forum is for the discussion of all topics relating to Linux certification.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-29-2016, 08:07 PM   #1
linux4evr5581
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 275

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Sys admin or Net admin?


Hey so im having trouble deciding on what would be the most appropriate route to take. I really enjoy using GNU/Linux and so I want to make a career out of it. I plan to get an A+, Network+, Security+, and Linux+.. Anyways right now i'm just an apprentice GNU/Linux user, but something I really want to accomplish at the moment is setting up a proxy of VMs with OpenVPN on my computer. Is this hard, like do I need to know sys admin stuff? Thanks in advance! Also one more question, why does apt-get update take fewer resources than the GUI based? Im using a Debian based distro.

Last edited by linux4evr5581; 09-29-2016 at 08:10 PM.
 
Old 09-29-2016, 08:12 PM   #2
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: MID-SOUTH USA
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 current / ArcoLinux / Void Linux
Posts: 8,511

Rep: Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775
Quote:
Originally Posted by linux4evr5581 View Post
Hey so im having trouble deciding on what would be the most appropriate route to take. I really enjoy using GNU/Linux and so I want to make a career out of it. I plan to get an A+, Network+, Security+, and Linux+.. Anyways right now i'm just an apprentice GNU/Linux user, but something I really want to accomplish at the moment is setting up a proxy of VMs with OpenVPN on my computer. Is this hard, like do I need to know sys admin stuff? Thanks in advance! Also one more question, why does apt-get update take fewer resources than the GUI based? Im using a Debian based distro.
for the last question it is because it does not have to generate a window (GUI) that takes up memory in order for it to show up on your screen.
 
Old 09-29-2016, 08:25 PM   #3
linux4evr5581
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 275

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by BW-userx View Post
for the last question it is because it does not have to generate a window (GUI) that takes up memory in order for it to show up on your screen.
Sorry that's not what I meant I meant like data, cus the GUI required like 300MB or something while the CLI took I think like 100MB..
 
Old 09-29-2016, 09:31 PM   #4
jpollard
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2012
Location: Washington DC area
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Slackware
Posts: 4,797

Rep: Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425
Quote:
Originally Posted by linux4evr5581 View Post
Sorry that's not what I meant I meant like data, cus the GUI required like 300MB or something while the CLI took I think like 100MB..
He did answer you. A GUI has a gigantic graphics library to funtion... On most desktops that library does all kinds of time wasting stuff - whether the application uses them or not, they still take up memory. And it is only going to get worse with Wayland... each application will have its own rendering, its own compositing...
 
Old 09-29-2016, 09:59 PM   #5
linux4evr5581
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 275

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpollard View Post
He did answer you. A GUI has a gigantic graphics library to funtion... On most desktops that library does all kinds of time wasting stuff - whether the application uses them or not, they still take up memory. And it is only going to get worse with Wayland... each application will have its own rendering, its own compositing...
Ohh ok I thought it was just maybe due to more programs being installed from extra boxes being checked or something.. OK thank you
 
Old 09-30-2016, 01:11 AM   #6
Turbocapitalist
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Linux Mint, Devuan, OpenBSD
Posts: 3,909
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858Reputation: 1858
If you are interested in networking you might look at the tool GNS3, if you haven't already. It is in the repository.
 
Old 09-30-2016, 06:52 AM   #7
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: MID-SOUTH USA
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 current / ArcoLinux / Void Linux
Posts: 8,511

Rep: Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpollard View Post
He did answer you. A GUI has a gigantic graphics library to funtion... On most desktops that library does all kinds of time wasting stuff - whether the application uses them or not, they still take up memory. And it is only going to get worse with Wayland... each application will have its own rendering, its own compositing...
WHAT!?!?!?

I have not been keeping up with the Wayland thing, but now through you I am hearing its going to be taking up more space due to how it is being written? Another Windows clone in the respect that, I remember back when Windows only took 300 MB to install the entire system, and Linux was way much lesser then that. now its around 30GB to install Windows and around a GIG or so to install Linux, all depending on which distro one picks to install.

now WayLand is going to be gobbling up HD space and I was looking forword to the change, Not that I personlly see any real reason for it, the GUI works with everything on my Linux/GNU.

Oh well what to do when they make Wayland the standard and good bye Xorg?

Last edited by BW-userx; 09-30-2016 at 06:54 AM.
 
Old 09-30-2016, 07:24 AM   #8
jpollard
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2012
Location: Washington DC area
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Slackware
Posts: 4,797

Rep: Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425
It has been getting more and more bloated as gtk gets bloated.

Now, instead of having ONE set of configuration files set for the X server, EACH place the application resides has to have the configuration... Even if it is just a copy. Then there is the crappy dbus situation where remote applications report an error due to dbus (which isn't even running on the remote as it makes no sense and would just amount to more bloat on the users login).

All this because the Gnome developers claim X is "outdated".

Personally, I just think the X server is due for another partitioning. The first time was separating the font server, the second moving to multi-threaded operation (though I may have the order wrong), the third was adding loadable modules for extensions. I also think the X protocol could do with a bit of a cleanup. I believe some of the X12 work was/is in that area.

Add an audio option for instance; remove some of the extraneous and nearly always unused window border stuff (it assumes a 2D display only) - add that to a standardized extension interface for toolkit use (make the toolkit local to the server host but accessible remotely - thus change your toolkit and you change the application interface, and reduce the remote code bloat and communication overhead as the toolkit no longer has to work remotely). And eliminate that spreading of configuration files all over the net.

Last edited by jpollard; 09-30-2016 at 07:26 AM.
 
Old 09-30-2016, 07:40 AM   #9
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: MID-SOUTH USA
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 current / ArcoLinux / Void Linux
Posts: 8,511

Rep: Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775Reputation: 1775
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpollard View Post
It has been getting more and more bloated as gtk gets bloated.

Now, instead of having ONE set of configuration files set for the X server, EACH place the application resides has to have the configuration... Even if it is just a copy. Then there is the crappy dbus situation where remote applications report an error due to dbus (which isn't even running on the remote as it makes no sense and would just amount to more bloat on the users login).

All this because the Gnome developers claim X is "outdated".

Personally, I just think the X server is due for another partitioning. The first time was separating the font server, the second moving to multi-threaded operation (though I may have the order wrong), the third was adding loadable modules for extensions. I also think the X protocol could do with a bit of a cleanup. I believe some of the X12 work was/is in that area.

Add an audio option for instance; remove some of the extraneous and nearly always unused window border stuff (it assumes a 2D display only) - add that to a standardized extension interface for toolkit use (make the toolkit local to the server host but accessible remotely - thus change your toolkit and you change the application interface, and reduce the remote code bloat and communication overhead as the toolkit no longer has to work remotely). And eliminate that spreading of configuration files all over the net.

and all of that should .. what take only a week?

that is what I read, was that it would take too long to go though all of that old code and try to clean it up and striaghten it up so it'd work better, so the next best this was to just write a new and different windows manager hence Wayland was concived. but like you siad it everything needs its own config file even if it is a copy that in itself is a waste, whereas X does not. why not just "fork" it in using some of it ideas that would elimminate that mulitpal config files, and that dbus issue.

unless that dbus is being set up for something in someones mind to do something with it later . don't know...

Makes me wonder if they'll still install X as a lagacy mode option when they finally offically release it into distros, like systemD
which I got away from them two andwent to void linux with its own init system all together
 
Old 09-30-2016, 08:39 AM   #10
JockVSJock
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: SATX
Distribution: RHEL/CentOS
Posts: 1,301
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 148Reputation: 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by linux4evr5581 View Post
Hey so im having trouble deciding on what would be the most appropriate route to take. I really enjoy using GNU/Linux and so I want to make a career out of it. I plan to get an A+, Network+, Security+, and Linux+..
I would skip any of the CompTIA certs, as they are terribly overpriced and have no value in the marketplace. You can look at various job postings to see what type of certs they are asking for to confirm this.

If you want to get a Linux certification, start with the Red Hat Certified System Administrator:

https://www.redhat.com/en/services/certification/rhcsa

A great website that does RHCSA training can be found here (I am not affiliated with them, I only use the website)

www.linuxacademy.com

If you interested in learning networking, start with the Cisco CCNA:

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/trainin...switching.html

Last edited by JockVSJock; 09-30-2016 at 08:42 AM. Reason: update with CCNA material
 
Old 09-30-2016, 09:50 AM   #11
jpollard
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2012
Location: Washington DC area
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Slackware
Posts: 4,797

Rep: Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425Reputation: 1425
Quote:
Originally Posted by BW-userx View Post
and all of that should .. what take only a week?
No. X12 has been around for a number of years. https://www.x.org/wiki/Development/X12/
Quote:

that is what I read, was that it would take too long to go though all of that old code and try to clean it up and striaghten it up so it'd work better, so the next best this was to just write a new and different windows manager hence Wayland was concived. but like you siad it everything needs its own config file even if it is a copy that in itself is a waste, whereas X does not. why not just "fork" it in using some of it ideas that would elimminate that mulitpal config files, and that dbus issue.
Wayland is not a window manager. It is an entire server, but without network capability. I believe they have added a "rdp" style extension for some network capability - but that requires each window to be first rendered on the remote system (virtual display), and then send the updates... There is supposed to be a shim X server available.
Quote:

unless that dbus is being set up for something in someones mind to do something with it later . don't know...
dbus hasn't sufficient security for remote capabilities unless something changed that I haven't seen - no encryption, no network authentication...
Quote:

Makes me wonder if they'll still install X as a lagacy mode option when they finally offically release it into distros, like systemD
which I got away from them two andwent to void linux with its own init system all together
 
Old 10-01-2016, 12:28 AM   #12
linux4evr5581
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 275

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
All very interesting stuff I read on another forum that their forking GNOME apps to generic X apps for GTK DKEs cus of "not invented here" attitude. I guess if you use XFCE desktop environment then nothing would change. Sorry not to informed on this..

Last edited by linux4evr5581; 10-01-2016 at 01:00 AM.
 
Old 10-01-2016, 12:32 AM   #13
linux4evr5581
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 275

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist View Post
If you are interested in networking you might look at the tool GNS3, if you haven't already. It is in the repository.
Awesome thanks I think Microsoft has something like this that I was going to use, only cus I didn't know Linux had something similar. Should of known better..
 
Old 10-01-2016, 12:38 AM   #14
linux4evr5581
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 275

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by JockVSJock View Post
I would skip any of the CompTIA certs, as they are terribly overpriced and have no value in the marketplace. You can look at various job postings to see what type of certs they are asking for to confirm this.

If you want to get a Linux certification, start with the Red Hat Certified System Administrator:

https://www.redhat.com/en/services/certification/rhcsa

A great website that does RHCSA training can be found here (I am not affiliated with them, I only use the website)

www.linuxacademy.com

If you interested in learning networking, start with the Cisco CCNA:

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/trainin...switching.html
I read that before somewhere too, but I still kinda want to read the books even if I don't need the certs, just to know the information...I knew about CCNA but I wanted to make sure I understood the basics first, but that would have the 4th cert on my list. Also I heard if you get linux+ you automatically get certified with LPIC and SuSe.. I was going to do that and then get a RHEL.

Last edited by linux4evr5581; 10-01-2016 at 12:39 AM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sys admin for developers markotitel Linux - Server 1 09-15-2014 01:12 AM
sys admin vs network admin sulekha Linux - General 5 01-11-2009 05:03 AM
how do I make myself sys-admin keratos Mandriva 4 06-05-2007 01:23 AM
Sys/Net Admin Stuff ankursaxena Linux - Newbie 1 03-15-2005 05:38 PM
Looking for a Linux Sys Admin ftbaccounts Linux - Certification 1 02-08-2005 12:11 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General > Linux - Certification

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:48 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration