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Old 10-16-2012, 06:31 AM   #1
iqubal0623
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Smile Linux Certification


Hi,
I m new to linux and want to improve my linux knowledge and will do the certification.So plzz suggest abt the certification courses for linux.

Thanks
Iqubal
 
Old 10-16-2012, 11:00 AM   #2
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iqubal0623 View Post
Hi,
I m new to linux and want to improve my linux knowledge and will do the certification.So plzz suggest abt the certification courses for linux.
Spell out your words, please. And what would you like us to suggest?? Without knowing what your goals are, or where you are in the learning process now, we can't tell you much. Red Hat's website has complete information about the courses, and you can find certification centers via the web also.

If you're looking for knowledge, the best thing to do would be to download CentOS, install it, configure it, and start learning. There are many books, but since you don't tell us what your goals are, we can't suggest any of them. Please, though....LEARN LINUX FIRST, before you go get a certification. There are MANY people who are 'certified', but have no idea what they're doing. Please, don't join their ranks.

Last edited by TB0ne; 10-16-2012 at 03:23 PM.
 
Old 10-16-2012, 11:03 AM   #3
JaseP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Please, though....LEARN LINUX FIRST, before you go get a certification.
Absolutely 100% Agree!!!
 
Old 10-16-2012, 06:01 PM   #4
CubanVJ
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Linux+ is a pretty basic cert but can be a bit dated at times. I would suggest you pick a distro (i.e. Fedora, OpenSuse, Mint, Ubuntu ), install it and then continue. When you feel comfortable enough with that, you can try Gentoo or Archlinux. These require more input and planning for the installs. Just my $.02
 
Old 10-16-2012, 09:10 PM   #5
bdchris1
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I think that learning Linux is what this person is trying to do, as said in the post. Don't berate-eduacate.
 
Old 10-16-2012, 10:00 PM   #6
GlennsPref
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I studied CompTIA A+ back in 1999, mcse2000, Well constructed and maintained, A strong foundation.

Here are some others from my bookmarks. HTH.

Unix tips at IBM developerWorks,


BASH,


RedHat study guide,


Australia, careerfaqs.

Online books...linuxtopia.org
 
Old 10-16-2012, 10:35 PM   #7
smturner1
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iqubal0623,

Much of what these folks are saying is true, but delivery is everything.

You do not need a certification unless a job requires it. It is a misunderstanding throughout IT that certifications are the hallmark of a good Admin. Most people learn as they go and get a more well rounded education that way.

To do list:
  • Choose a distro, preferably one that has a very good following (popular). Those distros tend to have more people willing to help.
  • Install it and configure it.
  • Learn the file systems and learn how to navigate them
  • learn some useful commands
  • Learn your text editor.
  • learn sed and awk
  • learn how to write scripts

The list goes on and many people may disagree about the order, but it gives you an idea where to start. This is a marathon, not a sprint. There is a lot to learn. Do not get discouraged!

Good luck and have fun.
 
Old 10-16-2012, 11:27 PM   #8
CubanVJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bdchris1 View Post
I think that learning Linux is what this person is trying to do, as said in the post. Don't berate-eduacate.
How was anything that I said berating ? Linux+ is a basic cert. It has some good basic knowledge but can be dated ? I'm relaying how I have learned. I started with Fedora, then XFCE Fedora, the Xubuntu, then Mint, and then openSUSE. I'm a Data Center Admin with 90 % RHEL 10 % MS. I've learned a lot on the job and don't have a single cert. When I have tried learning from all of the Linux+ programs (i.e. CBTnuggets or Safari), I found them to have very dated information that.

smtuner1 has a real decent list of natural progressions through the Linux world.
 
Old 10-21-2012, 07:57 PM   #9
enyawix
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Man I have used linux since 1996. Linux is only respected at very high levels like RHCE. The lower linux skills are outsourced to India. Get A+, Network+, Cisco CCENT, Security+ Cisco CCNA, Cisco CCNP, and in that order. A+ and Network+ are worthless in the job market, but are good for college credits.
 
Old 10-22-2012, 04:08 AM   #10
arun5002
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@enyawix


Quote:
Linux is only respected at very high levels like RHCE. The lower linux skills are outsourced to India
-What does you trying to say by these.whether all low profile linux work are done by indians

Last edited by arun5002; 10-22-2012 at 04:22 AM.
 
Old 10-22-2012, 10:01 AM   #11
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enyawix View Post
Man I have used linux since 1996. Linux is only respected at very high levels like RHCE. The lower linux skills are outsourced to India. Get A+, Network+, Cisco CCENT, Security+ Cisco CCNA, Cisco CCNP, and in that order. A+ and Network+ are worthless in the job market, but are good for college credits.
Sorry, but I disagree. I have hardly ANY respect for ANY certification, mainly because I've met far too many people who are 'certified' (yes, even with RHCE's), who don't have any skills beyond the very basics. And unless you're going to be a network administrator, there's no need to get a Cisco certification, unless you just want one. A good systems administrator will have far too much to do with their machines, than to worry about the upstream network...and that's why there's a team of network admins, who also are too busy to care about what the machines are doing. Unless one steps on the other, of course.

If I see someone with a certification on their resume, you had better believe the interview will grill them on details they should know. First wrong answer, and they're out the door.
 
Old 10-22-2012, 01:34 PM   #12
lghizoni
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Many will disagree with me, but if you really want a certification, I would recommend you this site: http://www.lpi.org/

And a good book to start with would be: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/LPI_Linux_Certification

Hope it helps.
 
Old 10-22-2012, 06:00 PM   #13
chrism01
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You should also have a read of the Certification forum https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...46/?daysprune= , which is where this thread should probably be.
 
Old 10-22-2012, 07:40 PM   #14
enyawix
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Sorry, but I disagree. I have hardly ANY respect for ANY certification, mainly because I've met far too many people who are 'certified' (yes, even with RHCE's), who don't have any skills beyond the very basics. And unless you're going to be a network administrator, there's no need to get a Cisco certification, unless you just want one. A good systems administrator will have far too much to do with their machines, than to worry about the upstream network...and that's why there's a team of network admins, who also are too busy to care about what the machines are doing. Unless one steps on the other, of course.

If I see someone with a certification on their resume, you had better believe the interview will grill them on details they should know. First wrong answer, and they're out the door.

Cisco certifications are very different than certs from Micro$oft, CompTIA, and even RedHad because you can not simply memorize information and pass a Cisco exam at any level. I study Cisco routing switching and voice because I am interested in networking from fiber optic cabling all the way up the OSI model to Applications. I am sure you are better with Linux than me but Cisco is making me a very well rounded technician.
 
Old 10-23-2012, 09:20 AM   #15
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enyawix View Post
Cisco certifications are very different than certs from Micro$oft, CompTIA, and even RedHad because you can not simply memorize information and pass a Cisco exam at any level. I study Cisco routing switching and voice because I am interested in networking from fiber optic cabling all the way up the OSI model to Applications. I am sure you are better with Linux than me but Cisco is making me a very well rounded technician.
I do agree that Cisco certifications are difficult to obtain, and they do show a good set of skills. But for a systems administrator position, they're not strictly NEEDED, but they are beneficial to have at times.

My point was that if you are a systems administrator with 200 systems under your control, chances are you won't have TIME to bother with what happens on the other side of the network jack. And, if you do have a good number of systems to babysit, you'll also have a network team that does deal with those things. Having network knowledge is a good thing, and you're to be applauded for getting that. But if you were in an interview with me....I'd not even look at Cisco certifications, because I need systems administrators.
 
  


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