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Old 12-09-2013, 08:11 PM   #1
future_computer
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Will HDD become extinct?


If SSD can reach TB easily at lower cost:

Quote:

A leaked Intel roadmap for solid state technology suggests the company is pushing ahead with its plans to introduce new high-end drives based on cutting-edge NAND flash. It's significant for Intel to be adopting 20nm NAND in its highest-end data center products, because of the challenges smaller NAND nodes present in terms of data retention and reliability. Intel introduced 20nm NAND lower in the product stack over a year ago, but apparently has waited till now to bring 20nm to the highest end. Next year, Intel will debut three new drive families -- the SSD Pro 2500 Series (codenamed Temple Star), the DC P3500 Series (Pleasantdale) and the DC P3700 Series (Fultondale).

The Temple Star family uses the M.2 and M.25 form factors, which are meant to replace the older mSATA form factor for ultrabooks and tablets. The M.2 standard allows more space on PCBs for actual NAND storage and can interface with PCIe, SATA, and USB 3.0-attached storage in the same design. This gives manufacturers more flexibility for product design.

The new high-end enterprise drives, meanwhile, will hit 2TB (up from 800GB), ship in 2.5" and add-in card form factors, and offer vastly improved performance. The current DC S3700 series offers 500MBps writes and 460MBps reads. The DC P3700 will increase this to 2800MBps read and 1700MBps writes. The primary difference between the DC P3500 and DC P3700 families appears to be that the P3700 family will use Intel's High Endurance Technology (HET) MLC, while the DC P3500 family sticks with traditional MLC.
 
Old 12-09-2013, 08:27 PM   #2
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Probably.

For someone who put down that he is a senior lecturer it surprises me that you don't provide a link to the full article and tell us where it come from.
 
Old 12-10-2013, 03:51 PM   #3
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There are 10TB platter drives around the corner and 100TB drives at universities being worked on. I have a 24TB NAS that will be 40 before the end of 2014 SSD's can't get cheap enough fast enough. There is the issue of data recovery, TRIM kinda eliminates the ability to recover from a corrupted drive. SSD's will replace platter drives platter drivers in the consumer space before long say '15..
 
Old 12-10-2013, 05:12 PM   #4
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Consider that tape, as a storage medium, is not extinct.
 
Old 12-10-2013, 06:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
Consider that tape, as a storage medium, is not extinct.
Some Corporates are still using tape to store data?
For home user, I think 1-2TB SSD will be enough,
I will choose SSD instead of HDD, in the next few years when I upgrade my PC.
 
Old 12-10-2013, 06:08 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by future_computer View Post
Some Corporates are still using tape to store data?
Yes.
 
Old 12-10-2013, 07:01 PM   #7
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What is the advantage of using tape?
I think the magnetic tape will spoil easier?
How big is its capacity?
 
Old 12-10-2013, 07:24 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by future_computer View Post
What is the advantage of using tape?
I think the magnetic tape will spoil easier?
How big is its capacity?
These are all things that you can easily find out yourself.

Last edited by dugan; 12-10-2013 at 07:40 PM.
 
Old 12-10-2013, 08:45 PM   #9
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u tell me, save my time
 
Old 12-10-2013, 08:52 PM   #10
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Reliability[edit]

Tape failure typically result in the loss of some hundreds of megabytes of data, while disk failures can cost terabytes. CERN has experienced failure rates 10^6 higher data losses on disk-based data.[1]

Durability[edit]

Tapes typically last decades, while disk storage is rarely reliable after 5 years.[1]

In 2011, Fujifilm and IBM announced that they had managed to record 29.5 billion bits per square inch with magnetic tape media developed using the BaFe particles and nanotechnologies allowing for an uncompressed tape drive of 35TB.[20][21] The technology is not expected to be commercially available for at least another decade.

Look like tape has its superiority.
 
Old 12-10-2013, 09:32 PM   #11
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Will HDD become extinct?

At least for my system, HDD is a thing of the past. SSD all the way.

Imagine, one day we'll tell our grand kids when we used HD drives and the 5 miles of snow and etc

Last edited by bobbyduhh; 12-10-2013 at 09:35 PM.
 
Old 12-11-2013, 05:37 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyduhh View Post
At least for my system, HDD is a thing of the past. SSD all the way.

Imagine, one day we'll tell our grand kids when we used HD drives and the 5 miles of snow and etc
Why do you say so?
Do u have enough storage with your SSD? How many GB?
 
Old 12-12-2013, 03:50 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by future_computer View Post
Do u have enough storage with your SSD? How many GB?
My work desktop machine uses 256Gb SSD and that's plenty of space as I don't need to store anything other than work and some music. Currently have around 100Gb free on it.

At home I'm a packrat, I have documents and software and images of old PCs dating back close on 20 years (including a VM of a Windows 3.11 machine) so I have standard SATA drives for that (2 x 2Tb).

So, to answer the OP, YES, HDD will become extinct, as to when.... not for a good few years yet. It'll only really be when the capacity and cost/Gb of SSD drops below that of spinners. Even when SSD replaces spinners I think tape will still be around for long-term backup.
 
Old 12-12-2013, 05:28 PM   #14
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SSD's will become extinct too. I suspect a 3D sort of storage maybe optical or such?

Or the world will almost end with the few left ignoring technology, just trying to survive.
 
Old 12-13-2013, 02:43 AM   #15
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I worked in Seagate before, the processes to make a HDD are so awesome,
many parts require high precision technology, very labor intensive,
need clean room facility.
I hope a simpler product with simpler processes can replace HDD.
 
  


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