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Old 11-12-2003, 03:35 PM   #1
KennyK
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Which certifications to get


I know that this is a pretty vague question. But here is the deal.

I am going to have the opportunity to be able to start studying full time and should have the funds available to do this. I would like to get everyones input on which cert to acquire and why. I have always wanted to get into the sysadmin/network admin field and here is my chance. If I get trained in Linux, would those skills still apply in Unix?

All input will be helpful

Regards, Kenny
 
Old 11-12-2003, 05:47 PM   #2
acid_kewpie
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the LPI generally comes out with the best all round opinion, but please please try searching this site, this gets asked a fair bit.
 
Old 11-12-2003, 06:13 PM   #3
williamwbishop
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Focus on one area for your specialization, but don't neglect to get several wide ranging ones if you're early in your career. Every OS and system has it's place, so don't neglect any. Sure, windows is easy, but get the certs in 2003 enterprise and the like. Add a unix to the mix, and networking(cisco or whatever) and you have a well rounded background. You won't run into many surprises.
 
Old 11-12-2003, 06:31 PM   #4
KennyK
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Quote:
Originally posted by acid_kewpie
the LPI generally comes out with the best all round opinion, but please please try searching this site, this gets asked a fair bit.
Sorry, I just got too excited and jumped the gun. I did search after I posted and found some good answers. Also, Jeremy mentioned that he was thinking about adding a cert forum. Where do we stand on that?

Unfortunately, I am getting in kind of late. I'm now 40 years old but it is never too late.

Regards, Kenny
 
Old 11-12-2003, 06:45 PM   #5
trickykid
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Quote:
Originally posted by KennyK
Also, Jeremy mentioned that he was thinking about adding a cert forum. Where do we stand on that?
Right now its on hold as far as I know. I'm sure it might still be up for consideration sooner or later.

And its never too late to learn new stuff..
 
Old 11-12-2003, 06:52 PM   #6
Whitehat
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Quote:
Originally posted by williamwbishop
Focus on one area for your specialization, but don't neglect to get several wide ranging ones if you're early in your career. Every OS and system has it's place, so don't neglect any. Sure, windows is easy, but get the certs in 2003 enterprise and the like. Add a unix to the mix, and networking(cisco or whatever) and you have a well rounded background. You won't run into many surprises.
Agree with what he said 100%.

I have my MCSE in NT4 and I am working on my 2003 MCSE. I also hold Linux+ and I will soon be getting my SQL Cert.

I have my certs because they help my job, and I like what I do. I won't get a cert if I can't stand that particular area.

I also can't stress how important it is for you to build a small network at home or work and do self study. I built a 5 box network from stuff I bought cheap off of ebay and that's what I studied with. I now use VMWare 4.0.

You will need to have at least 3 servers set up and a couple of client workstations. YOu can get a lot done with a small home network some Network Operating Systems, and some books/free documents.

I usually get a few books on each subject from amazon.com or borders. Like for my Active Directory 2003 cert I got 2 books worth about 40 bux each. One Sybex book and another book too. I use the books to read and also for reference when I'm done. If you buy say 5 boxes for around $110 each off of ebay, a KVM switch, a network switch, 1 Monitor, 1 Keyboard, and 1 Mouse, you should be able to set up your network for about $1000.

That's a cheap cool way to do it.

Hope I wasn't too long winded

Peace
 
Old 11-12-2003, 08:14 PM   #7
KennyK
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Whitehat,
I agree that there is nothing to compare to real experience. I do have a home network setup. I am currently running one RH 8.0 box that serves as web, mail, MySQL and Samba servers. I have a second one running RH 8.0 that is only running DNS. By no means am I a Linux guru, but I've been playing with it for a little while. Even have Virtual domain on my web server and am currently hosting about 10 sites. The thing is that I will really be able to make getting my experience and studying a full time deal.

So from what I have gathered by reading the other threads I should get my Certs in this order;

1. A+
2. Network+
3. Linux+
4. RHCE
5. MCSE

Any thoughts?

Regards, Kenny
 
Old 11-12-2003, 08:31 PM   #8
Whitehat
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That's totally up to you. I got my MCSE first, then my Linux+. That's just because that's how it happen to fall.

I think A+ is OK but in my opinion it don't really help out much. I would go for the bigger certs first. Or maybe Linux+ then like Server+ and then MCSE or RHCE.....
 
Old 11-12-2003, 09:04 PM   #9
KennyK
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I know that the A+ is nothing but a piece of paper and I would be able to pass it no problem since I've been putting PC's together and repairing them for years. But I did read that warrantied systems still under warranty by the big companies like Del, HP and such, the tech that works on them had to be A+ certified or else the warranty would be void. I'm not sure if this is true or not but that is what I've heard.
 
Old 11-12-2003, 09:35 PM   #10
trickykid
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Quote:
Originally posted by Whitehat
I think A+ is OK but in my opinion it don't really help out much. I would go for the bigger certs first. Or maybe Linux+ then like Server+ and then MCSE or RHCE.....
I'd have to agree. A+ is equivalent to like 6 months to 1 year experience in the field. I have a buddy that has his, didn't do squat either when he was looking for jobs. He didn't have any technical experience but had his A+, but when looking at jobs that required this, they also wanted experience along with it. So they didn't hire him at like 5 or 6 places he applied to.

I was going to get mine the same time he got his or after, but realized that it was a waste of money, I know way more than he does and he passed both tests in about 30 minutes or so. I was like, your kidding right, nope. After all that I realized I had about a year and a half experience already, got hired at one place, they didn't even call him...
 
Old 11-12-2003, 11:48 PM   #11
KennyK
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See, that's what I'm talking about. I have personal experience, and quite a bit. I have setup networks and have done system assembly and installs for some of my employers, however that was not my primary function at this place of employment. So, the fact that I have some real world experience in this field, probably more than some of the people getting these certs, I more than likely would not be considered do to the fact that I hold none of these certs.

So even having an A+ would be a jump start on my quest. I am sure that it would be a beginning.

That is my thoughts on this.
 
Old 11-13-2003, 05:51 AM   #12
titanium_geek
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How about a programing cert?
that might be interesting on a resumé.

And I agree with you about the A+, trickykid. My school is offering that as an elective, but i didn't take it b/c the teacher said I probably knew most of the stuff already.

titanium_geek
 
Old 11-13-2003, 10:04 AM   #13
williamwbishop
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Actually, larger companies generally send out work if it is under warranty. Warranties don't last long either. I know there have been times when equipment has stayed in the warehouse, or bench area and actually gone out of warranty(placing 4k pc's, you'd be surprised at how long it takes). MCSE in 2003 will be more valuable than in times past...it's actually enterprise capable for the first time. Personally, I've had a love hate relationship with m'soft for a long time, but this is the first time in years I've actually wanted to maintain a windows box in my home....
 
Old 11-14-2003, 03:55 AM   #14
Looking_Lost
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I'm actually doing an A+ just now, mainly because I get it for free. I know it's considered an entry level qualification but I was extremely surprised at just how "entry level" it is. I thought it would have went into things a bit more deeper and as for the Operating System exam I was quite taken aback by it - it seems to be a beginners quide to Windows - okay it's the OS you're most likely to encounter but there's barely a mention of the existence of an an other operating system which seems a bit strange from a supposedly vendor neutral
qualification.

Doing it as part of your High School educaton is probably a good thing, it can't do any harm if that's all they've got to offer, they don't offer things like that at Schools here (unless the world has changed since I threw my first paper aeroplane at the teacher while they had their back turned).

P.S Maybe the world has changed after all, I've just seen on some online store that they are selling colour monitors now

Last edited by Looking_Lost; 11-14-2003 at 04:00 AM.
 
Old 11-15-2003, 11:12 AM   #15
wgbjr
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I took the A+ exam a few years ago (back when it may have meant something), and it was really easy. I am currently working on Network+ and Linux+. Good luck!
 
  


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