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Old 11-27-2019, 10:16 AM   #256
jamison20000e
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It's about when they first revolutionized the fabric industry, with multiple colors, in one tapestry...
 
Old 11-27-2019, 04:36 PM   #257
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The Russia Hoax: The Illicit Scheme to Clear Hillary Clinton and Frame Donald Trump by Gregg Jarrett
https://www.amazon.com/Russia-Hoax-I.../dp/0062872745
 
Old 11-28-2019, 09:24 AM   #258
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The Black Dahlia (graphic novel).
Sketches are great (very specific with charcoal) and the story very interesting but rather complex/difficult to be fully understood.
I think I'm gonna read it twice ^^

If you are interested, there have been multiple adaptations, including the original novel from James Ellroy (mix between a real story and a fiction), a movie from Brian De Palma, and even a video game.

Last edited by l0f4r0; 11-28-2019 at 09:29 AM.
 
Old 12-03-2019, 02:10 PM   #259
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pastychomper View Post
Just started Edward Snowden's Permanent Record. I feel slightly odd reading an autobiography of someone several years younger than me, but I dare say I'll get used to that. The first chapter was great.
finally started reading it.
Reads like a The Hacker Perspective article but, obviously, a little more like a novel.
I ahave only just started but the experiences in the book also echo many posts here and, self-absorbed as I am, I even wondered about writing something similar.
 
Old 12-03-2019, 10:10 PM   #260
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The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins and The Spotted Dog by Kerry Greenwood.

What can I say? I'm a mystery buff.

Kerry Greenwood makes words dance.

Wilkie Collins does not, but it's arguably the first modern mystery novel and I want to read it.

Last edited by frankbell; 12-03-2019 at 10:11 PM.
 
Old 12-04-2019, 06:25 AM   #261
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Various C64 books, like Mapping the C64, the assembler handbooks, etc.
 
Old 12-04-2019, 08:00 PM   #262
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"The Wilderness War," by Allan W. Eckert.

"The Wilderness War"is an historical account of the British, with their Indians allies, the 'Six Nations,' against the newly declared United States of America.

"The Wilderness War" is primarily an account of the battles in the western American settlements in the western Pennsylvania and New York territories up to the Canadian border from 1773-1780.
 
Old 12-05-2019, 06:07 AM   #263
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arch Linux wiki

i have been planning to read Foundation series again, i did read'em (some of em) when i were a kid.

Quote:
Prelude to Foundation (1988)
Forward the Foundation (1993)
Foundation (1951)
Foundation and Empire (1952)
Second Foundation (1953)
Foundation's Edge (1982)
Foundation and Earth (1986)
 
Old 12-06-2019, 07:54 AM   #264
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuangTzu View Post
The Russia Hoax: The Illicit Scheme to Clear Hillary Clinton and Frame Donald Trump by Gregg Jarrett
https://www.amazon.com/Russia-Hoax-I.../dp/0062872745
Sounds like an enlightening book on the current political battles here in the US.

After you have read the book, and you feel inclined to do so, can you give us your thoughts on the merit(s) of the book? Or, a short critique?
 
Old 12-21-2019, 10:39 PM   #265
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As an addendum to my comments above, now that I've gotten into The Woman in White, I must concede that Wilkie Collins is a much better writer than I first thought.

His words do not dance so much as lumber along (he was a Victorian writer, after all, in an era of long paragraphs and complex sentences)--if they do dance, they dance to a dirge--but, as they lumber along, they create a forbidding and foreboding atmosphere.

//////, Asimov was a great writer, and not just of science fiction. I think Pebble in the Sky is my favorite work of his.

Last edited by frankbell; 12-21-2019 at 10:42 PM.
 
Old 12-22-2019, 09:12 AM   #266
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For me the most interesting thing about Asimov is that he created a whole universe without really meaning to. It started as a set of stories about robots. He was fed up with the standard robot story, which was just an endless retelling of Frankenstein: man makes robot, robot runs amok, man destroys robot. He knew there were much more interesting stories that could be told about robots, but they would fall flat if readers were just waiting for the robot to run amok. So he invented the Laws of Robotics to prevent that.

The Foundation stories came from a different root. In the 50s and 60s, sociologists were speculating about developing a mathematical model of the human mind that would enable them to predict the future of whole societies. Asimov just picked up this idea and ran with it. Of course there are no robots in these stories. I think they were originally not intended to be from the same universe.

Then he wrote The Caves of Steel and its sequel The Naked Sun as an experimental mash-up of science fiction and whodunnit, probably just because no one had done it before. And these books clearly belonged to the same universe as the earlier robot stories. But he needed a society in which the people of Earth had robotisation forced upon them and decided that this would be done by an advanced spacefaring human civilisation rather than by aliens. I think the clinching thing was when he realised that the conflict between earthlings and spacers could have led to the kind of empire (with spaceships but no robots) that the Foundation series describes. And so the whole thing became a connected world history. It's an amazing story.
 
Old 12-23-2019, 04:47 AM   #267
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I've just ordered a few of my favorite books for holiday gifts for my family

Soundings by Hank Searls - A speculative fiction of life on Earth from the POV of a whale, highlighting differing forms of mammalian intelligence with a strong sense of Oneness.

Boy's Life by Robert McCammon - A story of life in a small Southern town loosely based around a murder mystery and the secrets of a submerged city but with a depth and breadth worthy of any Vonnegut novel

Ringworld by Larry Niven - A Sci Fi novel so imaginative, unusual and fascinating that it spawned picket lines at Princeton and a few excellent sequels.

After the holidays have passed I'm ordering the newest book by Daniel Ellsberg - The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner primarily motivated by his recent symposium that revealed the US was already heavily involved in Southeast Asia by 1945 and the reflected affect that got Nixon elected, a major turning point in US History, which would have been even more profound had Watergate not ruined his actual plans to go Nuclear in Vietnam.
 
Old 12-23-2019, 09:58 AM   #268
dugan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
Boy's Life by Robert McCammon - A story of life in a small Southern town loosely based around a murder mystery and the secrets of a submerged city but with a depth and breadth worthy of any Vonnegut novel
Uh, Boy's Life did not have a submerged city. At least that I recall.
 
Old 12-24-2019, 08:17 AM   #269
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
Uh, Boy's Life did not have a submerged city. At least that I recall.
I haven't read it in quite some time which is partly why I bought it but I do check up on Robert McCammon from time to time and recently read this....

https://www.robertmccammon.com/artic...word_2008.html

In it he says

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert_McCammon
About the book. It began as a murder mystery in a small Southern town and was going to involve a secret in a second town that had been flooded and was underneath the lake. The main character was going to be the sheriff, ...
Maybe I'm just altering my memories of the whole monster fish thing to suit what I've more recently read, but I do recall the flood/lake being an issue. I'm happy I will be re-reading it very soon.

Incidentally the above link is also an interesting read as he shares how and why he wrote the book. It has always fascinated me, and undoubtedly plagued McCammon, regarding the conundrum of doing your best work almost "out of the gate" and then never seeming to hit that stride again. When one reads how the story was written and also gotten to press it makes more sense.
 
Old 12-28-2019, 10:48 AM   #270
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Reading the latest Harry Hole from Jo NesbÝ. Good fun, if murder detective fiction can be described as such yet a little amusing as his books take place in one of the cities you're least likely to be a victim of crime in.
 
  


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