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Old 10-29-2017, 10:38 AM   #31
rokytnji
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If not feeling like doing any work cooking. This is how my teenage boys rolled when hungry and nobody was home.


Shotglass of milk.
Jar of salsa.
Block of velveeta cheese.
Micro wave compatible bowl.

Throw the cheese you need into the bowl after cutting some of the block into cubes.
Pour in the salsa . My boys used 1/2 a 12 ounce jar .
Pour in the milk.

Pop in the micro wave and nuke the mess. Go grab your bag of chips from the cabinet.

After the ding. Grab the hot bowl and chips. Turn on the TV. Play video games.

Cool aid is optional.
 
Old 10-29-2017, 08:45 PM   #32
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Just a quibble. Velveeta is not cheese.

It's "cheese food," which means it is a cheese-like substance which is not cheese.
 
Old 10-30-2017, 01:30 PM   #33
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I go for a simple life. Tonight: potato, carrot, and sprouts boiling in one pan; partridge breast (or is it pheasant?) frying in another. Serve with a glass of vin ordinaire. After that, a satsuma and some dates.
 
Old 10-30-2017, 03:36 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
Just a quibble. Velveeta is not cheese.

It's "cheese food," which means it is a cheese-like substance which is not cheese.
My boys would roll their eyes and look askance at me and say " Whatever".

I avoided being a grumpy old dad. Remembering my youth and grownups.

Edit: as parents today. They have passed on their recipe to their kids.
Who also think it is cool.

Last edited by rokytnji; 10-30-2017 at 03:39 PM.
 
Old 11-22-2017, 02:30 PM   #35
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Bah! Who needs creamy pasta sauce that comes in a JAR?

  • Mince about three cloves of garlic. In your trusty cast-iron skillet or wok, gently fry in two tablespoons of sesame-seed oil until translucent. (As you mince the onions with your kitchen knife, remember to remove the green stem in the center of each clove since it can cause bitterness.)
  • If you like onions, consider liquefying a small peeled onion in the blender and add it to the mix, as well. (Your choice: "sweet" onions give one nice flavor, and "hot" onions, another.)
  • Add a teaspoon or so of "Herbes de Provence" (a popular "go-to" spice mixture consisting of savory, thyme, rosemary, basil, tarragon, and lavender flowers), and fry about a minute more. Savor the wonderful aromas that now have filled the kitchen.
  • Reduce heat and add half a stick or so of butter; salt and pepper to taste. The butter should brown, but do not let it burn.
  • When this has reduced slightly, add 1/2 cup or so of whole milk or cream. (Do not use "heavy whipping cream!" That stuff is not edible, anyways ...) (Another variation also adds about a quarter-cup of buttermilk.)
  • Allow these flavors to simmer slowly for a few minutes as the butter continues to brown. (Give it time, and observe carefully. A lot of the final flavors will develop at this point. Do not allow the milk to scorch.)
  • Add 1/2 package or so of ricotta cheese and a gently stir.
  • In a separate glass, mix about three tablespoons cornstarch in cold water, then add to the mixture as a thickener. (Tapioca starch can also be used.)
  • Add about 1/2 package or so of grated parmesan cheese or your favorite powdered-cheese mixture. Stir to be sure that all cheeses are smoothly and evenly blended, without lumps.
  • Variations, Additives, and Brainstorms: If you're feeling adventurous ...
    • Add a can of green peas, drained. (This foundation can easily be turned from a pasta sauce to a cream soup.)
    • How about a cup of shitake mushrooms, finely chopped?
    • A couple stalks of celery, likewise finely chopped?
    • Various meats can be added, too. For instance, I'm fond of a mixture of Italian sausage with prosciutto which is sold under the improbable brand-name, "Man Cave." It is raw and must be separately cooked. Allow the meat to develop a slightly-darkened but not-burned crust. Use several pulses of a blender to completely shred the cooked meat before stirring it into the pot. Wash-out the blender with a tiny bit of water and then add that, too. (If you want to more-completely express these flavors, break-up the uncooked loaf into small chunks and soak it for ten minutes in two cups of water with a tablespoon of salt added, then discard the salt-water before cooking.)
    • For a meatless preparation, consider capers. Wash the contents of a can to remove excess salt and juices, then pulse in a blender to liquefy before adding to sauce. (But, don't do this and meat, lest you wind up with a flavor train-wreck ...) Even when washed, capers add a considerable amount of salt, so plan accordingly.
  • Make a final check of the salt and pepper levels.
  • Now, put your trusty glass lid with a steam-hole in it over the top, and let it simmer, stirring occasionally. (In other words, "spend too-much time on LQ before you say, 'OMG, the Sauce!' As long as you set the heat so that it was no more than "gently bubbling," it will be just fine. "Quite frankly, at this point, 'the longer, the better.'")
  • Top with absolutely freshly-ground(!) black pepper, immediately before serving.
All measures are guesses – I said "or so" for a reason. You really can't go wrong with this one. Feel free to improvise.

(If you choose to employ all of my "Variations, Additives, and Brainstorms," all at the same time ... and, why not? ... then also stir-in two to three capfuls of reconstituted lemon-juice, or the juice of one whole lemon, at the beginning of the simmer, in order to bring the pH of the concoction slightly back toward acid. This will help to properly express the combined flavors. You will not taste the lemon.)

Relax and give this a couple of hours to prepare: it is very much a "hands-off" recipe. This recipe is one that works very well to be made ahead of time, since it gets better as it "rests" overnight (or longer) in the refrigerator in an airtight container.

I like to serve it over farfalle pasta, topped with a handful of fresh pine nuts. (You can also quickly fry these nuts until slightly browned in sesame-seed oil to bring out a very interesting and unexpected flavor: dish them out onto a paper towel, pat dry, and allow to cool.) But in this case the nuts add very little more to the complexity of what is already there, so feel free to omit them.

A few of my friends, upon serving, added one big dollop of Tobasco® sauce to their plates, and swore by the result. (Full Disclosure™: "They're from Texas." )

Even if you're "home alone in the kitchen," you can eat like a king for next to nothing. For a couple of days ...

Bon Appetit!

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 11-22-2017 at 08:48 PM.
 
Old 11-22-2017, 06:33 PM   #36
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No recipes from me today. The wife started the evening tonight with boiled shrimp cocktail with the base of the dipping sauce being Whataburger Hot Ketchup. With added extras like ginger and other stuff I don't know about.

Fresh Pumpkin pie is sitting on the counter. Cooling off. Wife cooked it also. She STUFFED the turkey with southern spicy cornbread stuffing.More will be in pan cooking also.
Wrapped the turkey with thick slices of bacon completely. Gonna cook it all night on low heat elevated a little with a full UN-capped beer bottle stuck up it's butt.

Deviled eggs
. Jalapeno cream cheese poppers, peach pie. These are on the table tomorrow. My wife is doing all the heavy lifting on this one.

I will carve the breast meat off the turkey after unwrapping the bacon and setting it aside to be hacked up on the cutting board. Then de-bone the dark meat and the rest and put that on a cutting board. Hand chop all of that to make a turkey dumpling soup with some body in it, dumplings made from just flour mixed with water to make the dough. Making enough for me and the dogs later on.. Leftovers.

Lot's of beer , wine, koolaid, eggnog. In the fridge. Getting cold. Bustelo Espresso for those that want coffee.

A few of thye wifes co-workers and some single biker dudes are coming over tomorrow for the eats and drinks.

Because Biker, beer, and bbq is not all we do. Happy Thanksgiving.

Edit: I did not mention the extras tomorrow like gravy, cranberries, mashed taters, peas and asparagus. Pickled onions and salads also.

Last edited by rokytnji; 11-22-2017 at 06:39 PM.
 
Old 12-15-2017, 02:57 PM   #37
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Seafood and Sauces

First of all I should mention that I am absolutely crazy about open fire or charcoal cooking. It's 18 degrees F today and for lunch I built a fire but in my mind Salmon deserves it, but I'll get to today's recipe shortly.

I am a novice at spices and sauces so I am just discovering the value for specific dishes and tastes. I asked a chef once about spices for cooking seafood and he recommended keeping it very simple so as to not overwhelm the rather subtle flavor of most seafood. I love simple and for example rarely ever use a steak sauce preferring just salt and pepper usually so his advice struck a chord with me. He suggested lemon juice, salt and pepper and that has served me well for over 20 years. Recently I tried a commercially prepared sauce/salad dressing designated as "Lemon Pepper" and found it has a bit more pizazz! than just lemon juice, common table salt and pepper, even though I always grind pepper fresh from peppercorns. However a lady recently prepared some nice salmon filets and had me grill them and it was possibly the best tasting salmon I've ever eaten.

Now in full disclosure she had bought Farm-Raised salmon of a variety that has visible "marble-ing" which does definitely increase and improve salmon flavor but I consider the sauce she used to be even more important. I've now tried this sauce with 4 different varieties of salmon and in every case it adds a terrific and complementary zing! without overwhelming the essential flavor of salmon.

Here's the sauce she recommended and I have tried. --- Makodo Honey-Ginger --- . I know a few local people who have bees and make local honey and I have a food processor that handles very hard nuts and herbs like ginger so I want to try making my own but until then this sauce is just fantastic.

My preparation consists of seasoning both sides for at least an hour with this sauce and at cooking time make a thin, little pan from aluminum foil and place the salmon, skin side up, in the "pan", add a little more sauce and lots of butter, a little salt, and a dash of oil (I like olive oil on salmon) and let that cook for about 3 minutes on very hot coals while enclosed with a top. It should smoke some. Then after 3 minutes, I flip it over so the skin side is down directly on the grill and all the juices flow on the coals and burst into flame. Immediately replace the top and shut down air supply and exhaust. The smoke should be very thick for the remaining few minutes of cooking. I like to flip it once more to get color and a slight crispness on the face but only for a minute, tops. I do that with the top off

The result is so delicious and appealing it can be served for any meal, breakfast, lunch or dinner... only side dishes, if any, need vary. For a full dinner I am rather fond of rice, which I cook in Thailand coconut milk and water, and sauteed baby asparagus in a 50/50 mixture of oil and butter cooked for not much more than one minute over very high heat. Cooked that way asparagus retains a nice crunch but is still soft enough to feel/taste properly cooked while retaining maximum flavor. That simple combination smells, looks, and tastes absolutely exquisite and will elicit rave reviews from just about anyone with a tongue.
 
Old 12-16-2017, 03:10 AM   #38
ondoho
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are people in the USA using actual herbs & spices (as opposed to processed food products) to flavor their food?
if i did salmon, i'd just chuck it (*) in the oven (not really a grilling person), skin down, with salt & dill & pepper sprinkled on top.
it's so greasy, it doesn't really need anything else.

(*) "it" would be a salmon sliced in half lengthwise, without the bones. i guess that's called a fillet.
 
Old 12-16-2017, 02:57 PM   #39
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I can't speak for anyone else but I use both herbs and spices as well as commercial products. Some of those herbs and spices I grow or harvest from where I live, others I buy as fresh, or in some cases like cinnamon and ginger, dried but otherwise untouched. Perhaps the two most important spices besides salt and pepper, are garlic and onions, which I buy fresh. As I mentioned above I get locally made honey. However I also like and use sauces, dressings, and marinades either by themselves or combined with fresh spices. It all depends on the dish and my mood.
 
Old 12-25-2017, 08:24 PM   #40
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I followed this recipe to roast a Christmas duck. I recommend it: http://www.mapleleaffarms.com/265?recipe=297

The procedures for draining off the fat (domestic ducks are notoriously fatty) worked very nicely.
 
Old 12-26-2017, 08:54 AM   #41
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Just my 2 cents. Living in cow country. Texas. I buy prime rib by the pound. I buy it in big roast slabs of meat.

Then take our carving knife and cut 3 or 4 steaks out of that roast. This comes out cheaper than buying a single prime rib steak.

Last night. Here is a simple recipe for asparagus for you single guys. This was part of Xmass dinner.

Buy a bunch of fresh cut asparagus.
Buy some Brachutto from your grocery store < It is pricey . So if Poor. Use Bacon I guess as a substitute >. But brachutto is what we used.

Wrap the asparagus with the salty meat. Cook in a skillet till your eyeballs says it is done.

Tastes like Heaven.
 
Old 12-26-2017, 10:25 PM   #42
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Sockeye salmon right out of the salt water, roasted over alderwood, served with a side of Manilla clams cooked over the bbq after a few changes of seawater in their bucket sprinkled with corn meal overnight, washed down with a 22-ouncer of Widmer Hefeweisen as the sun sets on a summer's day in the San Juans -- even beats the barbacoa I had near Ozona where la mejicana buried the goat with hot rocks and banana leaves and left it in the ground for who knows how long -- by a little!

Happy New Year!
 
Old 12-27-2017, 10:23 AM   #43
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Simple veggie rittata

In this case, start by cooking onion and garlic until translucent. Then cook leeks and kale-stems until soft, add kale (in bite-sized pieces). Spinach is a good alternative for kale and a bit less powerfully-flavored.

Into this now stir three beaten eggs and parsley leaves, stirring to fully coat the vegetables.

Bake in the cast-iron skillet that you've been using all along, about fifteen minutes until the eggs are set.

Top with parmesan cheese powder and pulverized almond powder. (Pulse almond slivers in the blender for a few seconds.)

If you're in a meat mood, chopped ham's a good simple addition, perhaps with a small dollop of dijon mustard well-stirred into the egg mixture. Shrimp is good too. (Shrimp must be properly cooked in advance, maybe with a bit of lemon.)

Good soul-food for a winter's evening. Even better the next day: allow the dish to "rest" for a while before serving.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caution!!

Put a mitt on the handle of the hot(!) skillet if you serve it in the skillet, to serve as a visual reminder to not touch the iron, and be sure to put it on a divot, not directly on the table. This serving method will keep the dish warm, but cast iron remains dangerously hot for a long time.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 12-27-2017 at 10:30 AM.
 
Old 02-09-2018, 09:39 AM   #44
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Who needs red pasta sauce that comes in a JAR?

So, I wasn't feeling terribly ambitious – how about pasta and tomato/meat sauce? I picked up a jar of decent-looking sauce and red the ingredients (as I must do, to avoid MSG and other food allergies). There was almost nothing to it. "So," me sez to me, "why not have a little fun in the kitchen tonight?"

I bought: (or, already had ...)
  • Eight small tomatoes. (The ones that come still attached to a piece of vine.)
  • A small sweet Vidalia® onion.
  • A fresh bulb of garlic.
  • A package of fresh basil leaves.
  • A package of fresh oregano leaves.
  • Sea-salt and fresh ground pepper.
  • Dark olive-oil – preferably in a metal can or a dark-glass jar.
  • Package of sliced mushrooms.
  • In quest for an "interesting" meat, a package of (raw, un-spiced) brotwursts.

Whipping out my trusty cast-iron wok and the blender, I first cut the wrapping off of about three "brots," cut them into loose pieces and pulsed them in the blender to make a nice sausage. I then cooked these in two tablespoons of olive oil, then set them aside, "tented" under a piece of aluminum foil and retaining all the juices. (Some people would have recommended using canola oil or vegetable oil at this step.)

Next, I took four whole garlic cloves, peeled them (very easy to do if you first crush them under the handle of your knife), diced them, and added them to the wok with the peeled-and-chopped sweet onion. As these cooked until translucent (about five minutes), I turned to the tomatoes, cutting them in pieces and liquefying them in the blender – peel and all – to produce about a blender-ful of liquid. (Discard stems. Be sure to remove the little bar-code labels that they tend to attach to each tomato!)

When the onions and garlic were done, I removed them from the wok and poured in most of the tomato liquid, reserving a small amount in the blender to which I now added the cooked garlic and onion, salt and pepper, and the leaves from three sprigs of basil and three of oregano. (Do not add the stems! Rub the leaves between your fingers several times before adding them.) I pulsed this in the blender to a fine consistency, then added it back to the wok along with a generous dollop of olive oil. Then, I added back the meat that I had previously cooked and set aside, stirred thoroughly, and turned the burner down to a low simmer.

I have a glass pan-lid with a small steam-hole in it, from another cooking-pot, which fits acceptably well on the wok, so I now simply cover it and let the whole thing simmer-down for an hour or more, stirring occasionally. (Nothing ever sticks to my well-seasoned cast-iron wok.) Toward the end of the cooking cycle, I very-briefly pulsed the mushrooms in the blender and added them. (The use of the blender throughout not only thoroughly-mixed the spices but also smoothed out the texture of the final sauce.)

I briefly considered adding a tablespoon of corn-starch but found that the sauce really didn't need thickening at all. I also considered adding fresh heavy cream – the real stuff. (Never use the ultra-pasteurized crap that has plastic thickeners in it!) Neither was necessary.

Once again, this is a sauce that is very delicious when fresh-made but even better after it has rested overnight in the fridge. If you're going to serve it that night, cut off the burner toward the end of the cycle and let the cast iron gradually cool, and/or dish it into a covered Corningware® container to "rest" for a while off-heat.

I tallied-up the ingredient cost and it was comparable with the jar of sauce that I didn't buy – and a lot more flavorful.

- - - - -

Tonight, for a culinary encore, some of that sauce and the rest of the brot-sausage is going to go into baked bell peppers topped with wheat germ, parmesan and romano cheese!

- - - - -

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 02-09-2018 at 01:02 PM.
 
Old 02-09-2018, 11:19 AM   #45
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Saw this yesterday:

The best cookbooks of 2017
 
  


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