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Old 02-28-2018, 01:58 PM   #1
jaxqen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Posts: 15

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Toshiba Satellite laptop keeps shutting down


Hello,

I have a Toshiba Satellite L750 laptop, with the last version of Mint installed on it. It used to shut down frequently, especially during browsing. Alto, it used to heat up. So I disassembled it and cleaned it quite thoroughly. Now the cooler works much better and it doesn't heat up anymore, but it keeps shutting down.

Some things:
- it shuts down with battery or without battery
- sometimes, with the battery, it discharges instead of charging, even though it looks like charging
- If I unplug and plug the cable several times, it may work and will charge properly
- it takes a while for my Mint to boot (10 minutes - yeah, I know) - I've heard that Toshiba is not that compatible with Linux
- I've changed the battery
- I've tried it with two different cables



Some questions:
- Could it be from the power jack?
- could it be from the Linux? (viruses, incompatibility)

Thanks,
 
Old 02-28-2018, 06:00 PM   #2
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys for decades while testing others to keep up
Posts: 1,834

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In general if it even boots up you don't have to worry about compatibility. If it wasn't, it wouldn't boot. Viruses? Highly unlikely as they are extremely uncommon. I've not even ever had a single one in 20 years of Linux use, up many hours 7 days a week. Shutting down is usually a hardware problem either heat or power problem.

First I have to ask how you know it cools better than it did? Do you monitor temps? Secondly, something is wrong with the Power and you may be right that it is in the jack. The jack has built-in switches and if they fail or worse, are intermittent, that could indeed account for all the problems you have.

It is likely helpful if you list the model name/number to check common problems.
 
Old 02-28-2018, 08:52 PM   #3
frankbell
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Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
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Posts: 13,562
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Check to make sure the cooling vents and the CPU are not fouled with dust causing the machine to overheat. Overheating is the most common cause of unexpected shutdowns.

Last edited by frankbell; 02-28-2018 at 08:52 PM. Reason: grammar
 
Old 03-01-2018, 01:06 AM   #4
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys for decades while testing others to keep up
Posts: 1,834

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My apologies. I don't know how I missed that you listed the model info. From what I can see heat is not a common issue but it is still worth knowing if you monitor temps. I still suspect the power system, possibly the jack, to narrow down the field.
 
Old 03-01-2018, 09:22 AM   #5
rokytnji
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: Waaaaay out West Texas
Distribution: AntiX 17
Posts: 5,516
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Just did this Linux install on a Chromebook. Did a John Lewis Full rom Bios change. Jumpered write protect on the mobo. I needed to do this. Thought I would share. You can do this in mint linux also.

Code:
harry@biker:~
$ su
Password: 
root@biker:/home/harry# sensors-detct
bash: sensors-detct: command not found
root@biker:/home/harry# sensors-detect
# sensors-detect revision 6284 (2015-05-31 14:00:33 +0200)
# System: Google Parrot [1.0]
# Kernel: 4.15.5-antix.1-amd64-smp x86_64
# Processor: Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU 1007U @ 1.50GHz (6/58/9)

This program will help you determine which kernel modules you need
to load to use lm_sensors most effectively. It is generally safe
and recommended to accept the default answers to all questions,
unless you know what you're doing.

Some south bridges, CPUs or memory controllers contain embedded sensors.
Do you want to scan for them? This is totally safe. (YES/no): y
Module cpuid loaded successfully.
Silicon Integrated Systems SIS5595...                       No
VIA VT82C686 Integrated Sensors...                          No
VIA VT8231 Integrated Sensors...                            No
AMD K8 thermal sensors...                                   No
AMD Family 10h thermal sensors...                           No
AMD Family 11h thermal sensors...                           No
AMD Family 12h and 14h thermal sensors...                   No
AMD Family 15h thermal sensors...                           No
AMD Family 16h thermal sensors...                           No
AMD Family 15h power sensors...                             No
AMD Family 16h power sensors...                             No
Intel digital thermal sensor...                             Success!
    (driver `coretemp')
Intel AMB FB-DIMM thermal sensor...                         No
Intel 5500/5520/X58 thermal sensor...                       No
VIA C7 thermal sensor...                                    No
VIA Nano thermal sensor...                                  No

Some Super I/O chips contain embedded sensors. We have to write to
standard I/O ports to probe them. This is usually safe.
Do you want to scan for Super I/O sensors? (YES/no): y
Probing for Super-I/O at 0x2e/0x2f
Trying family `National Semiconductor/ITE'...               No
Trying family `SMSC'...                                     No
Trying family `VIA/Winbond/Nuvoton/Fintek'...               No
Trying family `ITE'...                                      No
Probing for Super-I/O at 0x4e/0x4f
Trying family `National Semiconductor/ITE'...               No
Trying family `SMSC'...                                     No
Trying family `VIA/Winbond/Nuvoton/Fintek'...               No
Trying family `ITE'...                                      No

Some systems (mainly servers) implement IPMI, a set of common interfaces
through which system health data may be retrieved, amongst other things.
We first try to get the information from SMBIOS. If we don't find it
there, we have to read from arbitrary I/O ports to probe for such
interfaces. This is normally safe. Do you want to scan for IPMI
interfaces? (YES/no): y
Probing for `IPMI BMC KCS' at 0xca0...                      No
Probing for `IPMI BMC SMIC' at 0xca8...                     No

Some hardware monitoring chips are accessible through the ISA I/O ports.
We have to write to arbitrary I/O ports to probe them. This is usually
safe though. Yes, you do have ISA I/O ports even if you do not have any
ISA slots! Do you want to scan the ISA I/O ports? (YES/no): y
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM78' at 0x290...       No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM79' at 0x290...       No
Probing for `Winbond W83781D' at 0x290...                   No
Probing for `Winbond W83782D' at 0x290...                   No

Lastly, we can probe the I2C/SMBus adapters for connected hardware
monitoring devices. This is the most risky part, and while it works
reasonably well on most systems, it has been reported to cause trouble
on some systems.
Do you want to probe the I2C/SMBus adapters now? (YES/no): y
Using driver `i2c-i801' for device 0000:00:1f.3: Intel Panther Point (PCH)
Module i2c-dev loaded successfully.

Next adapter: SMBus I801 adapter at 0400 (i2c-0)
Do you want to scan it? (YES/no/selectively): y
Client found at address 0x18
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1021'...                     No
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1021A/ADM1023'...            No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1617'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1617A'...                             No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1668'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1805'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1989'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6655/MAX6656'...                      No
Probing for `TI THMC10'...                                  No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM84'...                No
Probing for `Genesys Logic GL523SM'...                      No
Probing for `Onsemi MC1066'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1618'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1619'...                              No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM82/LM83'...           No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6654'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6690'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6680/MAX6681'...                      No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6695/MAX6696'...                      No
Probing for `Texas Instruments TMP400'...                   No
Probing for `Texas Instruments AMC6821'...                  No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM95233'...             No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM95234'...             No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM95235'...             No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM95245'...             No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM64'...                No
Probing for `SMSC EMC1047'...                               No
Probing for `SMSC EMC1402'...                               No
Probing for `SMSC EMC1403'...                               No
Probing for `SMSC EMC1404'...                               No
Probing for `ST STTS424'...                                 No
Probing for `ST STTS424E'...                                Success!
    (confidence 5, driver `jc42')
Probing for `ST STTS2002'...                                No
Probing for `ST STTS3000'...                                No
Probing for `NXP SE97/SE97B'...                             No
Probing for `NXP SE98'...                                   No
Probing for `Analog Devices ADT7408'...                     No
Probing for `IDT TS3000/TSE2002'...                         No
Probing for `IDT TSE2004'...                                No
Probing for `IDT TS3001'...                                 No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6604'...                              No
Probing for `Microchip MCP9804'...                          No
Probing for `Microchip MCP98242'...                         No
Probing for `Microchip MCP98243'...                         No
Probing for `Microchip MCP98244'...                         No
Probing for `Microchip MCP9843'...                          No
Probing for `ON CAT6095/CAT34TS02'...                       No
Probing for `Atmel AT30TS00'...                             No
Client found at address 0x50
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1033'...                     No
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1034'...                     No
Probing for `SPD EEPROM'...                                 Yes
    (confidence 8, not a hardware monitoring chip)
Probing for `EDID EEPROM'...                                No
Client found at address 0x52
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1033'...                     No
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1034'...                     No
Probing for `SPD EEPROM'...                                 Yes
    (confidence 8, not a hardware monitoring chip)

Next adapter: i915 gmbus ssc (i2c-1)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus vga (i2c-2)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus panel (i2c-3)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus dpc (i2c-4)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus dpb (i2c-5)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus dpd (i2c-6)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: DPDDC-B (i2c-7)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y


Now follows a summary of the probes I have just done.
Just press ENTER to continue: 

Driver `jc42':
  * Bus `SMBus I801 adapter at 0400'
    Busdriver `i2c_i801', I2C address 0x18
    Chip `ST STTS424E' (confidence: 5)

Driver `coretemp':
  * Chip `Intel digital thermal sensor' (confidence: 9)

To load everything that is needed, add this to /etc/modules:
#----cut here----
# Chip drivers
coretemp
jc42
#----cut here----
If you have some drivers built into your kernel, the list above will
contain too many modules. Skip the appropriate ones!

Do you want to add these lines automatically to /etc/modules? (yes/NO)y
Successful!

Monitoring programs won't work until the needed modules are
loaded. You may want to run '/etc/init.d/kmod start'
to load them.

Unloading i2c-dev... OK
Unloading cpuid... OK

root@biker:/home/harry# exit
exit
harry@biker:~
$ sensors
acpitz-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
temp1:        +41.0C  (crit = +100.0C)

coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Package id 0:  +42.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)
Core 0:        +42.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)
Core 1:        +42.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)

harry@biker:~
$
also in Mint linux after you do this. You can post the output of

Code:
inxi -Fxz
So members can see more info on your hardware. Like video driver used.
Enorbet suggestion to check the power jack is easy. Touch it with your fingers. If it is too hot and burns. The jack needs to be replaced. I have done this on a Panasonic Cf-48 before.

Quote:
If I unplug and plug the cable several times, it may work and will charge properly
You say you cleaned it. How so? Describe it.

Virus? No.No.No. Even porn sites cannot harm you.

Last edited by rokytnji; 03-01-2018 at 09:28 AM.
 
Old 03-01-2018, 09:26 AM   #6
rokytnji
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: Waaaaay out West Texas
Distribution: AntiX 17
Posts: 5,516
Blog Entries: 20

Rep: Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620Reputation: 2620
Oh yeah. 10 minutes to boot you say? Hard drive probably needs to be replaced is a guess off the top of my head.

https://community.linuxmint.com/soft.../smartmontools
 
Old 03-01-2018, 10:15 AM   #7
dugan
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 8,150

Rep: Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273Reputation: 3273
Any clues in /var/log/messages?
 
Old 03-01-2018, 01:53 PM   #8
jaxqen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Posts: 15

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Thank you all for your help.

I've decided to:
- change the thermal paste with a better one;
- try some different distro (I have a lot of options here);
- if it doesn't work, change the jack;
- if not, buy a brand new laptop, what can I do or take it to a specialist.



Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
My apologies. I don't know how I missed that you listed the model info. From what I can see heat is not a common issue but it is still worth knowing if you monitor temps. I still suspect the power system, possibly the jack, to narrow down the field.
The temp is at 60 degrees. Celsius. 145 Fahrenheit, I believe.
Before I cleaned it, it used to heat up. And now it doesn't. At all.


About the compatibility, I've read that Linux is not that compatible with some laptop brands, Toshiba being one of them.


The viruses part, I've asked because I've also read in an article that it might be it, I know that it is a very very
small chance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
Check to make sure the cooling vents and the CPU are not fouled with dust causing the machine to overheat. Overheating is the most common cause of unexpected shutdowns.
Thanks, but like I said, I cleaned it. And I found dust, I removed it, I cleaned it with alcohol, I've added some lubrificant for the cooler.

I will add another thermal paste. I don't know how good was the last one.




Quote:
Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
Oh yeah. 10 minutes to boot you say? Hard drive probably needs to be replaced is a guess off the top of my head.

https://community.linuxmint.com/soft.../smartmontools

It might be, but it worked fine when I had Windows. Also, I remember trying other distros (Kali, Debian) and it booted normally.
 
Old 03-01-2018, 02:03 PM   #9
jaxqen
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2017
Posts: 15

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
Just did this Linux install on a Chromebook. Did a John Lewis Full rom Bios change. Jumpered write protect on the mobo. I needed to do this. Thought I would share. You can do this in mint linux also.

Code:
harry@biker:~
$ su
Password: 
root@biker:/home/harry# sensors-detct
bash: sensors-detct: command not found
root@biker:/home/harry# sensors-detect
# sensors-detect revision 6284 (2015-05-31 14:00:33 +0200)
# System: Google Parrot [1.0]
# Kernel: 4.15.5-antix.1-amd64-smp x86_64
# Processor: Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU 1007U @ 1.50GHz (6/58/9)

This program will help you determine which kernel modules you need
to load to use lm_sensors most effectively. It is generally safe
and recommended to accept the default answers to all questions,
unless you know what you're doing.

Some south bridges, CPUs or memory controllers contain embedded sensors.
Do you want to scan for them? This is totally safe. (YES/no): y
Module cpuid loaded successfully.
Silicon Integrated Systems SIS5595...                       No
VIA VT82C686 Integrated Sensors...                          No
VIA VT8231 Integrated Sensors...                            No
AMD K8 thermal sensors...                                   No
AMD Family 10h thermal sensors...                           No
AMD Family 11h thermal sensors...                           No
AMD Family 12h and 14h thermal sensors...                   No
AMD Family 15h thermal sensors...                           No
AMD Family 16h thermal sensors...                           No
AMD Family 15h power sensors...                             No
AMD Family 16h power sensors...                             No
Intel digital thermal sensor...                             Success!
    (driver `coretemp')
Intel AMB FB-DIMM thermal sensor...                         No
Intel 5500/5520/X58 thermal sensor...                       No
VIA C7 thermal sensor...                                    No
VIA Nano thermal sensor...                                  No

Some Super I/O chips contain embedded sensors. We have to write to
standard I/O ports to probe them. This is usually safe.
Do you want to scan for Super I/O sensors? (YES/no): y
Probing for Super-I/O at 0x2e/0x2f
Trying family `National Semiconductor/ITE'...               No
Trying family `SMSC'...                                     No
Trying family `VIA/Winbond/Nuvoton/Fintek'...               No
Trying family `ITE'...                                      No
Probing for Super-I/O at 0x4e/0x4f
Trying family `National Semiconductor/ITE'...               No
Trying family `SMSC'...                                     No
Trying family `VIA/Winbond/Nuvoton/Fintek'...               No
Trying family `ITE'...                                      No

Some systems (mainly servers) implement IPMI, a set of common interfaces
through which system health data may be retrieved, amongst other things.
We first try to get the information from SMBIOS. If we don't find it
there, we have to read from arbitrary I/O ports to probe for such
interfaces. This is normally safe. Do you want to scan for IPMI
interfaces? (YES/no): y
Probing for `IPMI BMC KCS' at 0xca0...                      No
Probing for `IPMI BMC SMIC' at 0xca8...                     No

Some hardware monitoring chips are accessible through the ISA I/O ports.
We have to write to arbitrary I/O ports to probe them. This is usually
safe though. Yes, you do have ISA I/O ports even if you do not have any
ISA slots! Do you want to scan the ISA I/O ports? (YES/no): y
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM78' at 0x290...       No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM79' at 0x290...       No
Probing for `Winbond W83781D' at 0x290...                   No
Probing for `Winbond W83782D' at 0x290...                   No

Lastly, we can probe the I2C/SMBus adapters for connected hardware
monitoring devices. This is the most risky part, and while it works
reasonably well on most systems, it has been reported to cause trouble
on some systems.
Do you want to probe the I2C/SMBus adapters now? (YES/no): y
Using driver `i2c-i801' for device 0000:00:1f.3: Intel Panther Point (PCH)
Module i2c-dev loaded successfully.

Next adapter: SMBus I801 adapter at 0400 (i2c-0)
Do you want to scan it? (YES/no/selectively): y
Client found at address 0x18
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1021'...                     No
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1021A/ADM1023'...            No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1617'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1617A'...                             No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1668'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1805'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1989'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6655/MAX6656'...                      No
Probing for `TI THMC10'...                                  No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM84'...                No
Probing for `Genesys Logic GL523SM'...                      No
Probing for `Onsemi MC1066'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1618'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX1619'...                              No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM82/LM83'...           No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6654'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6690'...                              No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6680/MAX6681'...                      No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6695/MAX6696'...                      No
Probing for `Texas Instruments TMP400'...                   No
Probing for `Texas Instruments AMC6821'...                  No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM95233'...             No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM95234'...             No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM95235'...             No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM95245'...             No
Probing for `National Semiconductor LM64'...                No
Probing for `SMSC EMC1047'...                               No
Probing for `SMSC EMC1402'...                               No
Probing for `SMSC EMC1403'...                               No
Probing for `SMSC EMC1404'...                               No
Probing for `ST STTS424'...                                 No
Probing for `ST STTS424E'...                                Success!
    (confidence 5, driver `jc42')
Probing for `ST STTS2002'...                                No
Probing for `ST STTS3000'...                                No
Probing for `NXP SE97/SE97B'...                             No
Probing for `NXP SE98'...                                   No
Probing for `Analog Devices ADT7408'...                     No
Probing for `IDT TS3000/TSE2002'...                         No
Probing for `IDT TSE2004'...                                No
Probing for `IDT TS3001'...                                 No
Probing for `Maxim MAX6604'...                              No
Probing for `Microchip MCP9804'...                          No
Probing for `Microchip MCP98242'...                         No
Probing for `Microchip MCP98243'...                         No
Probing for `Microchip MCP98244'...                         No
Probing for `Microchip MCP9843'...                          No
Probing for `ON CAT6095/CAT34TS02'...                       No
Probing for `Atmel AT30TS00'...                             No
Client found at address 0x50
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1033'...                     No
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1034'...                     No
Probing for `SPD EEPROM'...                                 Yes
    (confidence 8, not a hardware monitoring chip)
Probing for `EDID EEPROM'...                                No
Client found at address 0x52
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1033'...                     No
Probing for `Analog Devices ADM1034'...                     No
Probing for `SPD EEPROM'...                                 Yes
    (confidence 8, not a hardware monitoring chip)

Next adapter: i915 gmbus ssc (i2c-1)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus vga (i2c-2)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus panel (i2c-3)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus dpc (i2c-4)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus dpb (i2c-5)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: i915 gmbus dpd (i2c-6)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y

Next adapter: DPDDC-B (i2c-7)
Do you want to scan it? (yes/NO/selectively): y


Now follows a summary of the probes I have just done.
Just press ENTER to continue: 

Driver `jc42':
  * Bus `SMBus I801 adapter at 0400'
    Busdriver `i2c_i801', I2C address 0x18
    Chip `ST STTS424E' (confidence: 5)

Driver `coretemp':
  * Chip `Intel digital thermal sensor' (confidence: 9)

To load everything that is needed, add this to /etc/modules:
#----cut here----
# Chip drivers
coretemp
jc42
#----cut here----
If you have some drivers built into your kernel, the list above will
contain too many modules. Skip the appropriate ones!

Do you want to add these lines automatically to /etc/modules? (yes/NO)y
Successful!

Monitoring programs won't work until the needed modules are
loaded. You may want to run '/etc/init.d/kmod start'
to load them.

Unloading i2c-dev... OK
Unloading cpuid... OK

root@biker:/home/harry# exit
exit
harry@biker:~
$ sensors
acpitz-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
temp1:        +41.0C  (crit = +100.0C)

coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Package id 0:  +42.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)
Core 0:        +42.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)
Core 1:        +42.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)

harry@biker:~
$
also in Mint linux after you do this. You can post the output of

Code:
inxi -Fxz
So members can see more info on your hardware. Like video driver used.
Enorbet suggestion to check the power jack is easy. Touch it with your fingers. If it is too hot and burns. The jack needs to be replaced. I have done this on a Panasonic Cf-48 before.



You say you cleaned it. How so? Describe it.

Virus? No.No.No. Even porn sites cannot harm you.
Thank you,

I will try the power jack tip.
I opened it entirely, I cleaned the fan (lots of dust), I used lubrificant. A brush for the dust. Also, the CPU, there was some dust there too.


System: Kernel: 4.4.0-98-generic x86_64 (64 bit gcc: 4.8.4)
Desktop: Cinnamon 2.8.8 (Gtk 3.10.8~8+qiana)
Distro: Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa
Machine: System: TOSHIBA product: SATELLITE L750 v: PSK30E-03D004G5
Mobo: Intel model: N/A Bios: INSYDE v: 3.10 date: 02/10/2012
CPU: Dual core Intel Core i5-2430M (-HT-MCP-) cache: 3072 KB
flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx) bmips: 9578
clock speeds: max: 3000 MHz 1: 799 MHz 2: 799 MHz 3: 799 MHz
4: 803 MHz
Graphics: Card: NVIDIA GF108M [GeForce GT 525M] bus-ID: 01:00.0
Display Server: X.org 1.15.1 drivers: nvidia (unloaded: fbdev,vesa,nouveau)
tty size: 80x24 Advanced Data: N/A for root
Audio: Card-1 NVIDIA GF108 High Definition Audio Controller
driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 01:00.1
Card-2 Intel 6 Series/C200 Series Family High Definition Audio Controller
driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:1b.0
Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.4.0-98-generic
Network: Card-1: Qualcomm Atheros AR9285 Wireless Network Adapter (PCI-Express)
driver: ath9k bus-ID: 09:00.0
IF: wlan0 state: up mac: <filter>
Card-2: Qualcomm Atheros AR8151 v2.0 Gigabit Ethernet
driver: atl1c v: 1.0.1.1-NAPI port: 2000 bus-ID: 0a:00.0
IF: eth0 state: down mac: <filter>
Drives: HDD Total Size: 750.2GB (32.5% used)
ID-1: /dev/sda model: TOSHIBA_MK7575GS size: 750.2GB temp: 39C
Partition: ID-1: / size: 32G used: 7.9G (26%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda1
ID-2: /home size: 647G used: 211G (35%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda3
ID-3: swap-1 size: 10.00GB used: 0.00GB (0%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sda2
RAID: No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors: System Temperatures: cpu: 70.0C mobo: N/A gpu: 0.0:54C
Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info: Processes: 213 Uptime: 1:02 Memory: 1491.7/5949.3MB
Init: Upstart runlevel: 2 Gcc sys: 4.8.4
Client: Shell (bash 4.3.111) inxi: 2.2.28
 
Old 03-01-2018, 02:57 PM   #10
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxqen View Post
The temp is at 60 degrees. Celsius. 145 Fahrenheit, I believe.
Before I cleaned it, it used to heat up. And now it doesn't. At all.
Yes, 60C is the threshold of human pain though even 55C causes me to pull back...fast. What temps does it run now, post clean? It sounds good but it is important to quantify it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxqen View Post
About the compatibility, I've read that Linux is not that compatible with some laptop brands, Toshiba being one of them.
AFAIK the main incompatibility between some laptops and Linux is some wireless (wifi) chipsets. I've never run across any that would exhibit enough capability to install and boot but be incompatible in a manner that boot times are long, but succeed, and then randomly shutdown. That's almost certainly a hardware issue, not merely incompatible with Linux, but incompatible with any OpSys because it is failing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxqen View Post
The viruses part, I've asked because I've also read in an article that it might be it, I know that it is a very very
small chance.
It is at least a phenomenon that we all consider when things go awry but, yes, extremely unlikely for several reasons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxqen View Post
Thanks, but like I said, I cleaned it. And I found dust, I removed it, I cleaned it with alcohol, I've added some lubrificant for the cooler.
Did you use alcohol to clean the power jack? What lubricant did you use on the fan? Some lubes are not "electrical grade" so it must be considered.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxqen View Post
It might be, but it worked fine when I had Windows. Also, I remember trying other distros (Kali, Debian) and it booted normally.
If you have to remember then it seems that was enough in the past that it was possibly before what is likely a hardware failure. I agree that a disk or format failure is likely the cause of 10 minute boot times but I still find the weird power related events needs immediate attention. That most certainly is not a software issue of any kind.
 
Old 03-01-2018, 04:08 PM   #11
rokytnji
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Quote:
cpu: 70.0C
My panasonic cf-48 runs that hot. But it is 11 years older than yours. I re-pasted the cpu with artic silver and that is about where the temps range. 60 -70.

Still wondering about the multi - plugging the power jack till it works. Because loose connections generate heat in electrical because air is the ultimate insulator.

Maybe the adapter is toast inside where the cable is soldered into the male jack.
Thing is. Male jack gets hot. It tranfers heat to female jack. Which melts down solder on the mobo.

I know because I have seen and fixed this.

I take this laptop incompatibility thing with a grain of salt. Knowing how the kernel handles all the hardware. Most distros like Mint have that covered real well. You can see why I am kinda biased. Because I now run Google Chrome Linux laptop.Made by Acer.

Something that was more difficult to do in the past than today.

Quote:
Mobo: Intel model: N/A Bios: INSYDE v: 3.10 date: 02/10/2012
My chromebook is 2014 and is supported by a distro for older machines. Kinda funny. Huh?

Quote:
4.4.0-98-generic x86_64
That should have your toshiba covered real well.

Quote:
Graphics: Card: NVIDIA GF108M [GeForce GT 525M] bus-ID: 01:00.0
Display Server: X.org 1.15.1 drivers: nvidia (unloaded: fbdev,vesa,nouveau)
I see nothing weird there. Though the nouveau driver is usually good enough for me. Cuz I am not a gamer.

Quote:
CPU: Dual core Intel Core i5-2430M (-HT-MCP-) cache: 3072 KB
10 minutes to boot that. My internet is down. So I am on IBM laptop. Just because I have my hotspot phone password stored in Wicd when I use my phone as a router for my laptop.

Code:
$ inxi -f
CPU:       Dual core Intel Core i5-3320M (-MT-MCP-) cache: 3072 KB
           clock speeds: max: 3300 MHz 1: 1294 MHz 2: 1210 MHz 3: 1300 MHz 4: 1206 MHz
           CPU Flags: acpi aes aperfmperf apic arat arch_perfmon avx bts clflush cmov constant_tsc
           cx16 cx8 de ds_cpl dtes64 dtherm dts eagerfpu epb ept erms est f16c flexpriority fpu
           fsgsbase fxsr ht ida lahf_lm lm mca mce mmx monitor msr mtrr nonstop_tsc nx pae pat pbe
           pclmulqdq pdcm pebs pge pln pni popcnt pse pse36 pts rdrand rdtscp sep smep smx ss sse
           sse2 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 tm tm2 tpr_shadow tsc tsc_deadline_timer vme vmx vnmi vpid
           x2apic xsave xsaveopt xtopology xtpr
I boot in seconds. Not minutes.

Code:
$ inxi -b
System:    Host: biker Kernel: 4.9.83-antix.1-686-smp-pae i686 bits: 32 Desktop: IceWM 1.3.8
           Distro: antiX-15-V_386-full Killah P 30 June 2015
Machine:   Device: laptop System: LENOVO product: 2347DS2 v: ThinkPad T430 serial: N/A
           Mobo: LENOVO model: 2347DS2 serial: N/A
           UEFI [Legacy]: LENOVO v: G1ET41WW (1.16 ) date: 05/25/2012
Battery    BAT0: charge: 20.0 Wh 96.9% condition: 20.6/56.2 Wh (37%)
CPU:       Dual core Intel Core i5-3320M (-MT-MCP-) speed/max: 1216/3300 MHz
Graphics:  Card: Intel 3rd Gen Core processor Graphics Controller
           Display Server: X.Org 1.16.4 drivers: intel (unloaded: modesetting,fbdev,vesa)
           Resolution: 1600x900@60.01hz
           OpenGL: renderer: Mesa DRI Intel Ivybridge Mobile x86/MMX/SSE2 version: 3.3 Mesa 10.3.2
Network:   Card-1: Intel 82579LM Gigabit Network Connection driver: e1000e
           Card-2: Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6205 [Taylor Peak] driver: iwlwifi
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 320.1GB (24.9% used)
Info:      Processes: 174 Uptime: 2:57 Memory: 416.9/15936.5MB Client: Shell (bash) inxi: 2.3.54
But I have always prefered IBM laptops over Toshiba. My IBM T23 Thinkpad P3 still has not died.
My Dells are pretty bullit proof also.
Panasonic Toughbooks? I consider over rated. Cuz I own one. I massage it with my repair skills from time to time.
Replaced inverter and LCD cable. Mobo female power jack. New adaptec universal power adapter. Battery is still dead. Refurbish cpu. It is just a Test bed for the distro team I am a member of.

With a pentium 4 and 1.2 gig of ram. It is still relevant.

Good luck I guess figuring this out. Try a live run of something else small. Like salix . fluxbox or slackel. Or SlaX
See if boot times, overtemps, and shutdowns are the same. A live usb run with persistence will narrow something down I bet. Or confirm suspicions .

forgot to show my temps on this IBM laptop compared to yours

Code:
$ sensors
coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Physical id 0:  +44.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)
Core 0:         +43.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)
Core 1:         +44.0C  (high = +87.0C, crit = +105.0C)

acpitz-virtual-0
Adapter: Virtual device
temp1:        +42.0C  (crit = +104.0C)

thinkpad-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
fan1:           0 RPM
I have been on this rig since I last posted. That is when my ISP went down.

Last edited by rokytnji; 03-01-2018 at 04:19 PM.
 
Old 03-03-2018, 12:39 PM   #12
jaxqen
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Registered: Mar 2017
Posts: 15

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
Maybe the adapter is toast inside where the cable is soldered into the male jack.
Thing is. Male jack gets hot. It tranfers heat to female jack. Which melts down solder on the mobo.

I take this laptop incompatibility thing with a grain of salt. Knowing how the kernel handles all the hardware. Most distros like Mint have that covered real well. You can see why I am kinda biased. Because I now run Google Chrome Linux laptop.Made by Acer.


I see nothing weird there. Though the nouveau driver is usually good enough for me. Cuz I am not a gamer.

I boot in seconds. Not minutes.


Good luck I guess figuring this out. Try a live run of something else small. Like salix . fluxbox or slackel. Or SlaX
See if boot times, overtemps, and shutdowns are the same.

I've checked and it doesn't heat up.



Salix Linux looks OK. I will try it.
During my transition from Windows to Linux, I've tried different distros and I've had problems with quite a few (booting part, mostly). Being a noob at Linux, I've started reading some articles from different sources and some of them said that it is the hardware incompatibily. But who knows...
If I remember right, Debian, Kali and Tails booted fine, but I prefered Mint because the "experts" said that it's the best one for Windows users and Kali and Tails are for users who know their Linux.



By the way, your links from your signature are interesting. I will check them. Thanks!


Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
Yes, 60C is the threshold of human pain though even 55C causes me to pull back...fast. What temps does it run now, post clean? It sounds good but it is important to quantify it.

Did you use alcohol to clean the power jack? What lubricant did you use on the fan? Some lubes are not "electrical grade" so it must be considered.
You might laugh, but 60C is the post clean temp. But it doesn't heat up. By the way, it hasn't shut down in 2 days and I've used it quite a lot.

English is not my primary language, but as a rough translation it would be "Oil For Fine Mechanisms"
I used alcohol to clean the dusty plastic areas. The power jack does not look dirty.
 
Old 03-03-2018, 03:46 PM   #13
Trihexagonal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rokytnji View Post
But I have always prefered IBM laptops over Toshiba. My IBM T23 Thinkpad P3 still has not died.
I just purchased my 6th Thinkpad, and 8th laptop this morning on ebay. I picked up a Thinkpad T400 with Intel Core2 Duo T8600 @ 2.40GHz, 4GB RAM (upgradable to 8GB), 160GB HDD (that will be replaced), and 14.1" screen. I'm not sure if it has Intel or Intel/ATI integrated graphics but both work with FreeBSD.

Best part? I paid $55 for the laptop, but it didn't come with a battery, so buying one gave a total price of $67.70 delivered. The T61 I use the most went for about the same price and is my favorite of all my laptops.

With business lease returns it's the luck of the draw as to which one they grab. The image shown may not be of the one they pick if they have multiple laptops. Check their feedback profile. Something that looks good from a seller who had a lot of bad reviews is probably best passed for something a few $$$ more.

With a private seller you know more what you're getting and can query them. I've bought both types and always had good luck. It's in knowing what to look for in signs of wear, like shiny keys or spots on the spacebar, and if it still has the tags on the palmrest it's a sign of light use.

A lot of it is looking to buy at the right time, too, but there re some real deals to be had on vintage Thinkpads. This morning was right for me and I got the last one of that bundle of lease returns.

With 7 laptops I hadn't planned on buying another but it was such a good deal I couldn't afford not to buy it, and I do love getting a good deal on something.
 
Old 03-03-2018, 05:29 PM   #14
enorbet
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jaxqen you do understand since the translation is accurate BUT many oils conduct electricity and are bad for electronics. This is why other lubricants like Silicone are used and even some of those are not electrical grade. My all time favorite was Cramolin which was even used by NASA until it was pulled from production for some toxicity issue. It has been fairly effectively replaced by CAIOG's DeOxit and aI wouldn't use anything less for a laptop... at least one that I wanted to continue to function.

Regarding the "clean" appearance on the power jack/plug the "dirt" we are talking about is an often invisible film of oxidation. Something is wrong with that jack and it needs immediate attention to have any hope of narrowing down the problem.

Trihexagonal I'm not much of a laptop person but I bought a used Thinkpad T61 because of Joanna Rutkowska's study of the security of Intel CPUs which seems, now to be a warning not many including Intel paid any heed to which may cost them dearly. Aside from the peace of mind from the superior isolation of the T61 compared to later models I completely agree with you that it is a superb machine and it is a marvel that it came so cheap. Apparently when Win 7 was released it's increased hardware requirements caused an avalanche of those and others to enter the used sales market... cheap. Mine cost me $85 USD with battery and it runs Slackware beautifully. Everything works and the nvidia Quadro graphics are just superb. I'd recommend a T61 to anyone running Linux. I had to learn about the "blob" firmware support in Linux to get WiFi work but once that was done there is literally no feature that doesn't work and work flawlessly and it is quite snappy. I'm extremely pleased with my T61.
 
Old 03-03-2018, 06:10 PM   #15
Trihexagonal
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I went ahead and got a 250GB WD Scorpio Black HDD and 2 x 4GB RAM to max it out.

I have a birthday coming up and if I don't buy myself something I won't get anything, so I'm good to myself.
 
  


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