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Old 08-06-2021, 11:06 AM   #1
doumamuzan
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Angry This crypto trade site appears to be a scam site. I would like to hear your thoughts.


[removed]

My reasons

- I have never heard of the site
- I have never heard of the GPV coin
- The symbol of GPV coin looks overly similar to ETH
- A quick googling search returns very few results on GPV coin, if any
- The site does not look sufficiently professional enough
- Only one e-mail address where the customer service representatives can be reached at
- In the bottom of the page, there are four black and white images of Dukascopy, Signature Bank, Silvergate, Swissquote, but they are not links. They are simply images.
- even on eBay, I do not see any results when I type in GPV coin

Last edited by doumamuzan; 08-06-2021 at 11:29 AM.
 
Old 08-06-2021, 12:19 PM   #2
sundialsvcs
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All of this "crypto-currency" or "bit-coin" nonsense is nothing but a pure scam. Stay well clear.

In the eyes of the law, these "hard-to-compute numbers" and the entire trading system that now surrounds them are a barter system. (Which, by the way, is perfectly legal, and is regularly used for convenience in certain forms of commercial trade.)

The tokens that are being used for trade – and the law does not say what they must be nor how they are to be accounted for – are "worth" exactly what the users of that barter system agree that they are.

But – they are not legal tender.

The term, "legal tender," means that a creditor cannot refuse to accept it in payment of a debt. But, if you owe me money and you try to pay me in "bit-whatever," I can and certainly will refuse to accept it. Even if you try to persuade me that "somebody else would give $X,000 (in some "legal tender") for this hard-to-compute number," I am not one of them. Go find someone else to sell your precious number to, and bring me the demanded amount of cash.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 08-06-2021 at 12:23 PM.
 
Old 08-06-2021, 07:54 PM   #3
frankbell
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That's pretty much my opinion also. They are the ultimate in fiat currency, backed by noone and nothing other than an algorithm and valuable only because people think they are valuable.
 
Old 08-07-2021, 04:25 AM   #4
hazel
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For once I agree with Sundial. But "legal tender" no longer means what he thinks it means. There are many shops in London that no longer accept cash.

As to what is or is not money, I would suggest that real money has to have three characteristics: it must be able to act as a medium of exchange, a measure of value and a means of storing that value for the future.

A means of exchange: you must be able to buy stuff with it. Most sellers don't take bitcoin because they have no way of processing it. Try buying a a pint of milk or a meal in a restaurant with bitcoin!

A measure of value: you must be able to price goods in it so that they can be traded. You can't price anything in bitcoin because the basic unit is ridiculously high.

A store of value: you need to store the money you have earned so that you can spend it later. But anything that can lose half its value overnight is no good as a store of value.

Cryptocurrencies aren't money because, when push comes to shove, they can't do the work of money.
 
Old 08-07-2021, 04:47 AM   #5
valeoak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
All of this "crypto-currency" or "bit-coin" nonsense is nothing but a pure scam. Stay well clear.

In the eyes of the law, these "hard-to-compute numbers" and the entire trading system that now surrounds them are a barter system. (Which, by the way, is perfectly legal, and is regularly used for convenience in certain forms of commercial trade.)

The tokens that are being used for trade and the law does not say what they must be nor how they are to be accounted for are "worth" exactly what the users of that barter system agree that they are.

But they are not legal tender.

The term, "legal tender," means that a creditor cannot refuse to accept it in payment of a debt. But, if you owe me money and you try to pay me in "bit-whatever," I can and certainly will refuse to accept it. Even if you try to persuade me that "somebody else would give $X,000 (in some "legal tender") for this hard-to-compute number," I am not one of them. Go find someone else to sell your precious number to, and bring me the demanded amount of cash.
Scots and Northern Irish can't use banknotes as legal tender (only Royal Mint coins), so are they foolish for using banknotes?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
But "legal tender" no longer means what he thinks it means. There are many shops in London that no longer accept cash.
In Britain, "legal tender" has only ever concerned the repayment of debts - what a creditor can and cannot refuse under law for the repayment of a debt. (Well, the creditor can also refuse legal tender, but they effectively forfeit the debt and cannot claim lack of payment in the courts). It's never concerned daily commerce.
 
Old 08-10-2021, 08:58 PM   #6
frankbell
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I find the notion of businesses' refusing to accept cash repugnant.

If I buy, say, a 99 cent cup of coffee, I find the notion of having to put it on a card (or other non-cash vehicle) repulsive and absurd. Think of all the overhead expenses that could be avoided by simply accepting my 99 cents.
 
Old 08-12-2021, 09:30 AM   #7
sundialsvcs
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A credit-card or check is universally recognized to be "cash equivalent," as you can see for yourself by walking into a bank and making a withdrawal from your account: you will be handed cash.

Crypto barter-tokens are valuable only to people who willingly participate in that barter system. But you might have noticed that the people who are running the "exchanges" are taking their service-fees in dollars, or some other form of legal tender. The only thing that they care about is that you actually continue spinning the wheel.
 
Old 08-31-2021, 12:28 PM   #8
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SienJoel View Post
I am more than normal about all spammers. Such sites can be checked by looking for reviews. As a rule, every guy who often gets paid in spam has his own verified site. But I do not advise you to go where they offer spam for working with your spam. In fact, this is often a deception (as well as a lot when it comes to options, etc.). So far, I see the only adequate way to use SpamCoin. This is payment for digital services (books, music, movies, podcasts) or a gaming option (go url). In fact, games are increasingly being used as a flagship for spam and other spam .. But this is my personal opinion.
Spammer reported.
 
  


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