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Old 06-07-2023, 01:54 AM   #16
hazel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slac-in-the-box View Post
If you want to start a business but don't have the credit-score to open a business checking (not because you took a bunch of money and didn't pay it back; but merely because you never borrowed anything in the first place, and thus have a score of 0), you at least can accept cryptocurrencies...
This credit-scoring gotcha doesn't only affect businesses. I have no credit record because I have never been in debt. I often think it would be nice to have a credit card to make small purchases or donations online. I don't want to use my debit card because it's directly linked to my bank account, and a pre-loaded cash card always comes with a monthly fee (which makes it expensive unless you use it a lot). But this problem isn't caused by the use of central bank currency. It's caused by the use of computer algorithms to evaluate credit-worthiness. In the old days, it was a human bank manager who decided if you should have a credit card, not an algorithm, and it was obvious to such a person that if you had no debts, you must be the kind of person who paid their debts promptly. The answer therefore isn't cryptocurrency but the restoration of the local semi-independent bank manager.

Incidently, not all cryptocurrencies require "proof of work" to mint tokens. There are other kinds of authorisation which are less energy-intensive. But I don't know of any kind of crypto which can solve the problem of massive swings in value, and nothing which doesn't have a (fairly) fixed value can do the work of money.
 
Old 06-07-2023, 02:29 PM   #17
slac-in-the-box
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
This credit-scoring gotcha doesn't only affect businesses. I have no credit record because I have never been in debt. I often think it would be nice to have a credit card to make small purchases or donations online. I don't want to use my debit card because it's directly linked to my bank account, and a pre-loaded cash card always comes with a monthly fee (which makes it expensive unless you use it a lot). But this problem isn't caused by the use of central bank currency. It's caused by the use of computer algorithms to evaluate credit-worthiness. In the old days, it was a human bank manager who decided if you should have a credit card, not an algorithm, and it was obvious to such a person that if you had no debts, you must be the kind of person who paid their debts promptly. The answer therefore isn't cryptocurrency but the restoration of the local semi-independent bank manager.

Incidently, not all cryptocurrencies require "proof of work" to mint tokens. There are other kinds of authorisation which are less energy-intensive. But I don't know of any kind of crypto which can solve the problem of massive swings in value, and nothing which doesn't have a (fairly) fixed value can do the work of money.
I was like you, with a zero score, because I just saved up for what I wanted, and didn't borrow. I was able to use my debit card for most things. When vacationing in Australia, I used my debit card to rent a vehicle from Hertz, and drove it so fast around their continent, that I received dozens of speeding tickets from hidden camera/radars. I never paid them to see if my USA insurance would notice... it never did.

But then in good old Chicago, USA, car theft capital of the world, I got off a train and tried to rent a car from Hertz, and they would not accept my debit card. In chicago, only a credit card would work, because appparently kids from the hood would use their first debit/visas to rent cars, and the cars never were returned, so more stringent methods were required.

Anyways, I got so mad, I went and bought a car instead of renting one (not new, of course). But buying and selling cars everywhere I want to go is a hassle, and eventually I gave in and got a credit card just so I can rent cars when I travel.
 
Old 06-07-2023, 09:00 PM   #18
sundialsvcs
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There's actually nothing wrong about "credit" as long as you can get a sensible rate. But today's industry is entirely based on what used to be called usury, which used to be illegal.
 
Old 06-07-2023, 09:40 PM   #19
slac-in-the-box
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
@slac ...

In most "traditional" barter systems, there is no limit on obtaining "valid barter tokens." The only "twist" in this system is that, now, the "acceptable tokens" are hard and expensive to compute. (Until, inevitably, someone finds the necessary mathematical trick.)

Beyond that "obstacle," these numbers/tokens may as well be tulips.

Recent and ongoing legal cases have already demonstrated just how easily the whole system can be "gamed." The entire system depends upon so-called "exchanges" which, as it turns out, can very easily be robbed by their owners, who have access to the cash. (It should be of no surprise to anyone that the perpetrator, (or at least, "the one who took the fall") ... was less than thirty years old ...)

It also depends on "trust" which as is the usual practice in all "con games," turns out to be entirely misplaced by the suckers.

"... and two to take him."
yeah... and how just threat of sec suit makes one plummet and another rise -- not very stable.
 
Old 06-07-2023, 09:45 PM   #20
slac-in-the-box
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
There's actually nothing wrong about "credit" as long as you can get a sensible rate. But today's industry is entirely based on what used to be called usury, which used to be illegal.
yeah... for them most part, despite local biases, I still prefer @hazel's human banker; or even the rural shopkeepers--that face to face chemistry, to this usury... I hope they make it illegal again.
 
Old 10-27-2023, 08:00 AM   #21
duneexplorer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slac-in-the-box View Post
yeah... and how just threat of sec suit makes one plummet and another rise -- not very stable.
You've raised some valid points about the psychology of NFTs and cryptocurrencies. It's true that the value can sometimes seem abstract, and trust can be a bit of a wild card.
You mentioned recent legal cases highlighting vulnerabilities in the system, and yeah, it can be a risky game. It's crucial to tread carefully and do thorough research.
I hope you found a solution to your concerns, but if you're also on the lookout for a secure crypto wallet, you might want to give mpc wallet as a service a shot. It's an option that can provide added security for your crypto assets.

Last edited by duneexplorer; 11-09-2023 at 05:08 AM.
 
Old 10-28-2023, 10:26 PM   #22
sundialsvcs
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Didn't a guy who ran a "crypto exchange" just get thrown in prison for taking advantage of that so-called "trust?"

But: Good luck getting back any of the real money that he managed to steal.

Just remember ... although technology is not "devious and cunning," just behind that technology you will find people(!) who most certainly are. A computer algorithm, no matter how carefully devised, does not operate in "a human vacuum." There are thieves everywhere.

"Caveat ... [X]" ... "And two to take him."

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 10-28-2023 at 10:28 PM.
 
  


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