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Old 06-09-2021, 11:54 AM   #1
Grobe
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Taught about open drivers and AI


Hi.

This is just me thinking, and may not be feasible at all.

Linux have many open source drivers for various components. But for components of especially GPU, WiFI chips, there are manufacturers known to not reveal documentation for their product so that making open source drivers is very hard and time consuming, and assume it's not feasible to make open source drivers that are as efficient and stable as those from the manufacturer.

The idea is this : With the progress in AI, wouldn't it be possible to make an AI based driver for any given component, ending up with a driver that is about as effective and stable as the hardware itself ?
 
Old 06-09-2021, 12:10 PM   #2
hazel
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I don't think running an AI like that on user machines would be feasible. It would be too resource-heavy. But maybe someone could write an AI for use by the kernel team that could systematically write different data into a device's registers, measure the results, and gradually learn by trial and error what needs to go where.
 
Old 06-09-2021, 06:25 PM   #3
Grobe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
I don't think running an AI like that on user machines would be feasible. It would be too resource-heavy. But maybe someone could write an AI for use by the kernel team that could systematically write different data into a device's registers, measure the results, and gradually learn by trial and error what needs to go where.
Well, that last thing you said is what I had in mind (not AI on every users computer).
 
  


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