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Old 05-15-2024, 12:05 PM   #61
shortarcflyer
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Speaking of twitter:

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) -A federal court ordered on Tuesday that Elon Musk must testify again in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's investigation into his $44 billion takeover of Twitter.

The SEC sued Musk in October to compel the CEO of electric carmaker Tesla and rocket company SpaceX to testify after he refused to attend a September interview for the investigation. The billionaire said the SEC was trying to "harass" him with a number of subpoenas.

The investigation concerns whether Musk broke federal securities laws in 2022 when he bought stock in Twitter, which he later renamed X. It is also reviewing statements and SEC filings he made in relation to the deal, the agency has previously said.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler in February ruled in favor of the agency to compel the deposition and Musk requested a review of the decision.

"As Judge Beeler explained, the investigations Musk contends constitute harassment are 'legitimate government investigations'," U.S. District Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley said on Tuesday.

"Musk has not met his burden of demonstrating the subpoena is unreasonable."




https://www.yahoo.com/news/us-federa...212110906.html
 
Old 05-15-2024, 02:03 PM   #62
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Another case of an entitled brat who thinks because they do not agree with a law that it should not apply to them. That has NEVER flown well in a US court!
 
Old 05-15-2024, 07:37 PM   #63
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Now I have to wonder if some here are Russian or Chinese bots trying to undermine what is of demonstrable value in US culture. I grew up with "Better Dead than Red" Curiouser, and curiouser.
 
Old 05-16-2024, 07:22 AM   #64
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"Starlink has been installed on 200+ cruise ships around the world, with many more set to come online soon to keep their passengers and crews connected with high-speed internet while on rivers and at sea." https://twitter.com/Starlink/status/1790426484022342081
 
Old 05-16-2024, 10:00 AM   #65
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Starlink exceeded all previous/other satellite internet providers by gaining more subscribers in 2 years that the others combined achieved in 20 years. Even if those numbers were exaggerated by an order of magnitude (they aren't, judging by the phenomenal income) that's what I call a successful service.

Also, just FTR, that success is largely due to the low price of massive coverage made possible by unprecedented low cost and high volume of launches to orbit made possible by the "Fail fast" method that many still cite as a negative despite SpaceX routinely accomplishing what both Space and Business experts have said was impossible or unprofitable. Compare and contrast the "innovation and expertise" of The Old Guard like Boeing with SLS.

TBH that's not a dig against Boeing necessarily as they are hamstrung by government requirements to "use old gear" from the Shuttle program keeping them in the past instead of allowing innovation, an extremely foolish effort to save money that has backfired bigtime.

A somewhat hidden success is the whole "beaten path" effect of SpaceX largely demonstrating private enterprise is in the position to make all Space Enterprises profitable, innovative, and in fast advancement mode. SpaceX has turned what was a wasteland into fertile ground, benefiting all of Humanity.
 
Old 05-16-2024, 02:06 PM   #66
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Problem with 'government' is the money isn't theirs and it is budget controlled. Second it has to work the first time, or the public/congress gets its panties in a twist.... So sloooow innovation and a lot of PR/lobbying. Whereas when using private money. Pretty much try what you want, when you want. A rocket blows up, crashes on landing, no biggie. Adjust for why, and build another until you get it right or money runs out. Then prove it air worthy for men to be aboard, off and running. Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy have proved themselves over and over again. Waiting on Starship ...
 
Old 05-16-2024, 02:19 PM   #67
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It's worthy of note that before NASA had actual private assistance that wasn't funded by Congress, SpaceX was on the verge of bankruptcy, saved only by Elon's own moneys and even that was at risk after a few "unscheduled rapid disassemblies" that just squeaked over the finish line with.., I can't recall offhand if it was the 3rd, 5th whatever try but his going "all in" allowed a whole new industry to be born where such rapid development is on the fast track.

I'm really stoked for Starship launch #4. So many improvements already from so many launches already instead of years long waits for one-offs.
 
Old 05-17-2024, 12:18 AM   #68
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What worries me about starlink is that suddenly there are going to be millions of extra satellites for other satellites to crash into.If a sizeable number of them get smashed up, there will be billions of fragments to crash into other satellites. How long before a branching chain reaction takes them all out?
 
Old 05-17-2024, 07:42 AM   #69
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That's actually a needless worry, hazel, at least for the foreseeable future. It's not like a congested highway down here on the surface of our Earth. It's 3 dimensional, not 2, and with many miles of space between on both X and Y axes. The effective altitudes (Y axes) alone for earth satellites ranges from around 3,000 miles to 25,000 miles. That's quite a swath! ... LOTS of wiggle room for devices measured in mere feet.
 
Old 05-17-2024, 06:37 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
What worries me about starlink is that suddenly there are going to be millions of extra satellites for other satellites to crash into.If a sizeable number of them get smashed up, there will be billions of fragments to crash into other satellites. How long before a branching chain reaction takes them all out?
#1 Crashing into one is a reasonable worry, and all space programs are having headaches working around what is already up there. This will make it a LOT worse.

#2 The chain reaction thing is not much of a worry. The distances between satellites and the trajectories involved make it very unlikely. That said, if something explodes into (effectively) a scattershot cloud of rocks then impacts become FAR more likely and FAR more difficult to predict. Probably less destructive, but still worrisome.

Either way, at some point we might need HOOVER to make something that will "clean up" the orbital cloud to make it safer for commuters.
 
Old 05-18-2024, 06:58 AM   #71
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https://aerospaceamerica.aiaa.org/fe...sler-syndrome/
Quote:
A Kessler Syndrome cascade is something that, whether it has begun or not, would play out over the course of decades if not centuries, rather than fitting into the runtime of a Hollywood drama.
[...]
However, humanity would not be “locked in” on Earth in such an event, he says, given that crewed spacecraft headed for deep space would cross the problematic altitudes so quickly. But there are still plausible scenarios that are far from ideal. Linares sees a potential future where “humans probably don’t have any incentive to launch satellites, because we’re losing 50% of them” to collisions with debris, he says.

Matney puts it like this: Kessler Syndrome “won’t cause orbital altitudes to be unusable. It’s more like a gradual degradation that’s going to cost everybody more money.”
 
Old 05-19-2024, 07:27 AM   #72
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Elon Musk
@elonmusk "Honored to launch @Starlink in Indonesia!"
https://x.com/elonmusk/status/1792129896690639175



Grok (Ai):

"Elon Musk's Starlink Shines on Indonesia's Remote Areas
Elon Musk launched Starlink satellite internet service in Indonesia on May 19, 2024, aiming to improve connectivity in the country's remote areas. The event, which took place in Bali, was attended by Musk and the Indonesian Health Minister Budi Gunadi Sadikin. The launch has been widely discussed on social media, with users expressing excitement and concerns about the service's potential impact on global internet access, economy, and safety, particularly in remote and conflict-affected areas."


and:

"On May 18, 2024, SpaceX successfully launched a Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, deploying 23 Starlink satellites into low-Earth orbit. This mission marked the 21st launch and landing of the Falcon 9 booster, setting a new record. The launch was visible from various locations in Florida, creating a stunning jellyfish-like effect in the evening sky. Additionally, SpaceX is preparing for another launch from Vandenberg Space Force Base on May 21, 2024, targeting the deployment of the NROL146 satellite. The launch from Vandenberg is significant as it is the first from the base in over a decade."
 
Old 05-19-2024, 10:52 AM   #73
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I tried to use search to find a more appropriate thread but got a 524 timeout. Using the forum at the moment is a colossal pain in the a**.
"The New Shepard capsule landing under two of it's three parachutes after one failed to unfurl normally. Blue Origin says the capsule is designed to land safely with just two parachutes.
9:47 AM · May 19, 2024" https://x.com/SpaceflightNow/status/...461613/photo/1
 
Old 05-21-2024, 10:22 AM   #74
enorbet
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A few sobering facts for the Elon Musk haters here:

There are roughly 2,000 billionaires in the world as of April 2024 according to Forbes. Most people can name a handful at best because most of the extreme wealthy prefer anonymity and very few do publicly high profile work with their wealth, good or bad, from any point of view.

Name ONE that has spent/risked his wealth to accomplish anything even possibly of benefit to the future of Humanity more than Elon Musk. Take all the time you wish.

In my view it matters little if that benefit is merely secondary, collateral or by primary design. The result is the same to everyone else whether or not the ventures also enrich the investor and, really, shouldn't anyone and everyone hope to gain something for their efforts? Personally, I find most so-called "altruists" disingenuous Virtue Signalers and Armchair Quarterbacks. A few here are simply Contrarians.
 
Old 05-21-2024, 01:04 PM   #75
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"After months of waiting, SpaceX has finally received an FCC license to operate its new “V4” Starlink dish and the upcoming “mini” dish model on moving cars, ships, and planes.

The FCC initially issued SpaceX a license to operate the next-generation dishes in September, but only for fixed positions. Last week, the US regulator then granted SpaceX the additional authority to operate the new dishes onboard aircrafts, vessels, and mounted vehicles." https://www.pcmag.com/news/spacex-ge...nes-ships-cars

https://www.scribd.com/document/7344...C2023022800232
 
  


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