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Old 02-22-2008, 10:33 AM   #1
frenchn00b
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Quicky electronic question: just a problem with Amperes?


Hello,

I received a powersupply that converts: 110v 60hz =====>>> 22.5v 1.25 Amperes


Since I am in Europe, I have 220volts.

I have a powersupplyconvertor that does the following:
it is writen that on it
220v =====>>> 22v 6Amperes
here is the pic

Will I burn the device if I use this alternative " 220v =====>>> 22v 6 Amperes" supply ?

thanks !!!!!!!!!!!

Last edited by frenchn00b; 02-22-2008 at 11:38 AM.
 
Old 02-22-2008, 10:44 AM   #2
masonm
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No, the current rating on a power supply tells you how much current it is capable of supplying. A device or circuit only draws the amount of current it needs to operate regardless of how much the supply can provide. A supply doesn't force feed current into a device.
 
Old 02-22-2008, 11:29 AM   #3
weibullguy
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Under normal conditions the supply will only deliver the current required by the load. While a decent power supply will have overload protection to minimize the probability of fire or other damage, the 6A supply's setpoint is likely to be higher than the 1.25A supply (that should make sense). Under fault conditions your 6A supply is capable of delivering more than 4x's the current of the 1.25A supply before it automatically clears the fault. I would recommend that you not use the 6A supply unless absolutely necessary due to the safety concerns. If you do use the 6A supply, I would recommend some form of appropriately sized overload protection (like a fuse or thermal switch) between the output of the supply and the load.
 
Old 02-22-2008, 11:40 AM   #4
frenchn00b
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Here I could find a picture of the alternative 6amperes powersupply:
http://www.mercateo.com/p/102-510511..._SPS_2406.html

A fuse in between... well I unfortunately have not much idea how to add this. Thanks for your help also !

Someone told me here that we have to multiply, the volts x amperes and both values of the powersupplies should match. But that I do not trust much ...

Last edited by frenchn00b; 02-22-2008 at 11:45 AM.
 
Old 02-22-2008, 12:00 PM   #5
masonm
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That supply will do the job for you but as pointed out if the device in question suffers a short that causes a large current draw the device will surely be destroyed (or catch fire) long before the power supply's over current protection kicks in. As long as you're ok with such a risk go ahead and use it.

You could splice a fuse holder into the output side of the line, but if you aren't skilled at such work I'd suggest paying a professional to do it, or better yet find the correct 220V power supply for your device. That would be the safest option.
 
Old 02-22-2008, 12:01 PM   #6
masonm
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Oh yeah, you can also purchase an adapter that will step down your 220V to 110V and then you can use the one you have now. Americans traveling abroad often use such adapters so they can use their appliances while traveling.
 
Old 02-22-2008, 12:11 PM   #7
frenchn00b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masonm View Post
That supply will do the job for you but as pointed out if the device in question suffers a short that causes a large current draw the device will surely be destroyed (or catch fire) long before the power supply's over current protection kicks in. As long as you're ok with such a risk go ahead and use it.

You could splice a fuse holder into the output side of the line, but if you aren't skilled at such work I'd suggest paying a professional to do it, or better yet find the correct 220V power supply for your device. That would be the safest option.
well the powersupply will stay on a wooden floor... So I do not want big fire lucky you helped me

so I got directly to the shopping center to try to find somethign adapted ... I hope I can find
 
Old 02-22-2008, 12:12 PM   #8
frenchn00b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masonm View Post
Oh yeah, you can also purchase an adapter that will step down your 220V to 110V and then you can use the one you have now. Americans traveling abroad often use such adapters so they can use their appliances while traveling.
I saw one box like and it was pretty big. a big metal box, and I was fearing that it could burn out.
I d like to avoid anhy fire when i am not there.

shopping center maybe ... hmm
 
Old 02-22-2008, 12:34 PM   #9
weibullguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frenchn00b View Post
Someone told me here that we have to multiply, the volts x amperes and both values of the powersupplies should match. But that I do not trust much ...
Ask whoever told you that if they think replacing a 100V, 1A power supply with a 1V, 100A power supply (or vice versa) makes much sense. If they say it does make sense, you know not to trust them!!!
 
Old 02-22-2008, 01:08 PM   #10
frenchn00b
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Damn I went to the shop

and the guy told me that on the box of the powersupply 220v, it is writen 6amperes MAXIMUM http://www.mercateo.com/p/102-510511...SPS_2406.html; hence he said that it will not burn and is out of danger. He guaranted it, but you know he was 18-20 and of course they do not do electronics or too little, the salesmen.

what to do now ? I am stuck ...
 
Old 02-22-2008, 03:11 PM   #11
weibullguy
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I wasn't referring to the power supply burning, I meant what ever you are powering with the power supply. I'm old, one of my degrees is in electrical engineering, I've worked in nuclear power plants most of my adult life and when I wasn't working in a nuke plant, I was still working with electrical/electronic equipment. I work as a safety/reliability engineer. I guarantee that your laptop is more likely to catch fire if you use a grossly over sized power supply than one that's properly sized. If the 1.25A supply is correctly sized, then the 6A is grossly over sized. Sure, it will work, but as a safety engineer, I'm telling you there's a risk.
 
Old 02-22-2008, 04:32 PM   #12
frenchn00b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weibullguy View Post
I wasn't referring to the power supply burning, I meant what ever you are powering with the power supply. I'm old, one of my degrees is in electrical engineering, I've worked in nuclear power plants most of my adult life and when I wasn't working in a nuke plant, I was still working with electrical/electronic equipment. I work as a safety/reliability engineer. I guarantee that your laptop is more likely to catch fire if you use a grossly over sized power supply than one that's properly sized. If the 1.25A supply is correctly sized, then the 6A is grossly over sized. Sure, it will work, but as a safety engineer, I'm telling you there's a risk.
You're the One !
I tried the powersupply 6A, and it sounds like the charging of my roomba 560 is not working.

I am planning to buy a converter 220v to 110v.
they say that's the MOSFET TSV protection, that hangs.
http://www.roombareview.com/chat/vie...42244e9a78f431

I have no idea now how to get this american 110v power, and the charging of my docking station roomba 560.


Tomorrow, I'll buy that the 220v to 110v converter box, and I hope that it will work (??)
 
Old 02-22-2008, 09:37 PM   #13
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http://www.shoptronics.com/re16waun110v.html
 
Old 02-23-2008, 04:45 AM   #14
crashmeister
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First of all it only puts out 5 amps at 22 volts and second of all you won't burn anything.

If the amps or voltage are too low it doesn't work.
If the voltage is too high it crashes and burns.
It the amps are too high nothing happens.

If you put a 800 watt power supply in a pc that only uses 250 watt it doesn't burn anything either.

Might not be the most efficient thing to do but it will work.
 
  


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