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Old 01-23-2019, 05:23 PM   #46
enorbet
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Let me softly suggest you consider if you actually need UEFI. What is driving you to use it as opposed to the substantially simpler BIOS/MBR model??
 
Old 01-24-2019, 07:04 AM   #47
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It's something new and I wanted to see if I could learn how to use it. Besides, what's the use of having new snazzy hardware if you don't take advantage of it? UEFI chips won't always have a legacy option, you know; that will disappear at some point.

I've found out why the elilo path acts like it's hard-coded. It is! You need to use efibootmgr to modify it. I thought before that the UEFI simply scanned the ESP and picked up anything that had a .efi suffix, but apparently not. It needs to be told exactly what file to use.

I don't think efibootmgr has an edit mode. The eliloconfig script deletes any existing Slackware entry and creates a new one. I have been studying the script intensively and I have puzzled out the actual commands used but I won't be using them any time soon. Just adding a second stanza to elilo.conf should give me my dual boot without mucking about with UEFI.
 
Old 01-24-2019, 12:54 PM   #48
hazel
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So I added the extra stanza and got a partial lfs boot. Then the kernel panicked because it couldn't find sda9 on the gpt hard drive. I shall have to reconfigure obviously. But as far as elilo is concerned, it worked.
 
Old 01-24-2019, 02:01 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
It's something new and I wanted to see if I could learn how to use it. Besides, what's the use of having new snazzy hardware if you don't take advantage of it? UEFI chips won't always have a legacy option, you know; that will disappear at some point.
That's what I asked you to consider. What advantage does UEFI hold for you? Of course your choice is absolutely viable and correct even if all you want to do is learn how it works. If that is the only advantage at this time however, I'd like to point out that over time it is likely to change and become more refined. I've simply chosen to "fold when it costs me to stay in" and that should be an easy transition.

Granted a parallel might be drawn to the transitional period we are in for 32bit vs/ 64 bit where multilib for some is a necessary PITA until everything is 64 bit (nobody is suggesting 128 bit are they?) but thankfully simple ability to boot is a far simpler issue than running varieties of apps on an underlying OpSys.

Anyway I wish you good fortune and hope you have fun "nailing it". I was just curious of what motivated your struggle.
 
Old 01-24-2019, 02:30 PM   #50
hazel
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Well, I have nailed it as far as elilo is concerned. The problem is that in spite of reconfiguring and rebuilding my LFS kernel, it still can't find its root partition (/dev/sda9). So it panics and reboots. I checked the config file for gpt support (it's in the block layer section) and found that active, so clearly something else is missing. Maybe I should post to the lfs mailing list and see if anyone can suggest what is missing. I don't want to have to crawl through an enormous file generated by diffing the working Slackware kernel and the non-working LFS one.

Even if I did use legacy boot, it wouldn't solve this particular problem because the partitioning of the drive would still be the same.
 
Old 01-24-2019, 02:36 PM   #51
ehartman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
Even if I did use legacy boot, it wouldn't solve this particular problem because the partitioning of the drive would still be the same.
I don't even think legacy boot CAN be from a non-primary (that is: 1 thru 4) partition.
But somebody may prove me wrong.
 
Old 01-24-2019, 02:44 PM   #52
hazel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
I don't even think legacy boot CAN be from a non-primary (that is: 1 thru 4) partition.
But somebody may prove me wrong.
If it was a legacy boot, it would use LILO or GRUB and they can both boot logical disks with high numbers. For example on my old machine I had Debian on /dev/sda9. But whether they can boot primary partitions with numbers higher than four (given that those wouldn't exist on a real mbr disk), I don't know.
 
Old 01-24-2019, 02:58 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
I don't even think legacy boot CAN be from a non-primary (that is: 1 thru 4) partition.
But somebody may prove me wrong.
That may still be true for MSDOS and Windows, but it is absolutely untrue for other operating systems and has been since at the very least the 1980s. PC DOS introduced MBR in 1983 and MBR could be applied to Logical partitions by 1985. By 1993 I was running OS/2, DOS, and Windows and OS/2 was routinely booted on Logical partitions. This was made more reliable and recovery and multiple boot friendly by installing the bootloader on it's own 4 MB FAT12 partition. Partitions could be toggled to "Active" and others hidden if needed all in the same process.

For more than you probably would like to know on the subject....

This page is labelled "The OS/2 Boot Sequence" but it provides complete background of how MBR evolved and is utilized --- How MBR Works ---

Here is a background info graph of about 50 Boot Loaders and their capabilities --- Boot Loaders ---

I am writing this from Slackware on a Logical partition and have 6 other operating systems on their own partitions. IIRC the record is something like 30 operating systems on one PC.

Last edited by enorbet; 01-24-2019 at 03:10 PM.
 
Old 01-24-2019, 06:41 PM   #54
greencedar
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Hazel, This is an interesting project. Keep us posted. Looking forward to the end result.
 
Old 01-25-2019, 07:57 AM   #55
hazel
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I think I've cracked it! The old lfs kernel has CONFIG_SATA_AHCI unset. Ahci is the hardware driver for modern sata drives. The Slackware kernel uses it so lfs needs it too. I'll build it in and try again.

If anyone wants to know how I arrived at this, the answer is that I studied Slackware's dmesg output, looking particularly for anything that happened just before the sata drive was recognised. I saw this ahci thing and googled it. I don't know if building it will fix the problem but it's worth trying.
 
Old 01-25-2019, 10:36 AM   #56
hazel
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Yes, that was the problem. Setting that config variable made LFS bootable. However I now have a new sheaf of problems! The first was that LFS did not recognise my keyboard or mouse. I was using a usb mouse with it before so I must have USB_HID configured in. But maybe the usb controller on this machine is different.

So I got out the old PS2 keyboard that I used before and that was recognised. I was able to log into LFS. What is more, the PS2 keyboard gives me proper function key behaviour which the Lenovo keyboard does not. Remember that these Thinkstations are really laptops packed into a tower format; until recently their keyboards worked in the same way. Each function key had an additional special use which could be selected with the "function" key. But now they have switched it around: the keys default to this special use and you need the "function" key to get the normal F1..F12 codes, which is very awkward for Linux users. You can switch between virtual consoles by using alt-function-Fn, but it's almost impossible to reach a virtual console from an Xorg display. To do that you would need to press ctrl-alt-function-F1. The "function" key btw is next to F12. Just imagine it!

Later Lenovos are supposed to have a UEFI setting to restore the old behaviour but I haven't found anything like that in mine. My old Logitech PS2 keyboard behaves in a similar way but has a function lock key that I can use to force traditional Fkey behaviour.

But I really do need to find out why USB function is so limited in LFS running on this machine. It's not just the human interface device stuff like keyboard and mouse. My printer and scanner aren't recognised either. There must be some fundamental driver lacking, like with the ahci sata driver. Once again I hope comparison with the Slackware kernel config and boot messages will point me to an answer.
 
Old 01-25-2019, 10:56 AM   #57
hazel
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Yes, I think I've found it. This machine has a USB-3 port as well as several USB-2 ones and it uses a common driver called xhci, which is not activated in my LFS kernel. It's supposed to be great improvement on the older USB drivers. I shall have to build this driver into the LFS kernel and then everything should work.

Last edited by hazel; 01-25-2019 at 10:57 AM.
 
Old 01-25-2019, 01:56 PM   #58
ehartman
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Quote:
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Yes, I think I've found it. This machine has a USB-3 port as well as several USB-2 ones and it uses a common driver called xhci, which is not activated in my LFS kernel.
xhci is the USB-3 capable replacement for the ehci module that was used for USB-2 ports.
 
Old 01-25-2019, 02:14 PM   #59
hazel
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I'm posting this from LFS. Adding xhci made the kernel recognise all usb devices. [brag]Aren't I a clever girl?[/brag]

Initially, I couldn't get online but I soon twigged that that was because my ethernet card had a different name (LFS's udev uses the new path-specific names by default, though you can ask for the traditional eth0 if you want) and that stopped the network startup script from working. I didn't have that problem in Slackware because Slack uses traditional names. I have edited the relevant script so I don't anticipate any further problems.

Shutting down now for the night. See you all tomorrow.
 
Old 01-26-2019, 11:41 AM   #60
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
I'm posting this from LFS. Adding xhci made the kernel recognise all usb devices. [brag]Aren't I a clever girl?[/brag]

Initially, I couldn't get online but I soon twigged that that was because my ethernet card had a different name (LFS's udev uses the new path-specific names by default, though you can ask for the traditional eth0 if you want) and that stopped the network startup script from working. I didn't have that problem in Slackware because Slack uses traditional names. I have edited the relevant script so I don't anticipate any further problems.
Yes... you are Obviously quite a few people are following the way you suss out the learning curve. It's quite interesting and enjoyable, and in some cases, instructive!.. and part of that cleverness is your having chosen to take on Slackware for which we can apply the same question... "Isn't Slackware a clever Linux?"
 
  


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