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Poll: Would you, if money was no object, buy a million dollar dose in hopes of extending yours, or someone
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Would you, if money was no object, buy a million dollar dose in hopes of extending yours, or someone

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Results will be available after the polls close.

The nominees are:

Yes, In a Heartbeat!
Maybe, but likely later after more develops
No Freakin' Way!
I Have Never even heard of such a thing and doubt any extension is possible or desirable

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Old 12-17-2019, 10:50 AM   #16
enorbet
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A few of the posts here got me to thinking about aging reversal as an adjunct to merely extending lifespan. So I started doing some research into how that has advanced since it was first noted as a real possibility a little over a decade ago. I'm looking into some serious Science about this but I suspect most would enjoy a layman's introduction. Here's one.... (Bold emphasis is mine)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia - Biological Immortality
In 2016, scientists at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and the Mayo Clinic employed genetic and pharmacological approaches to ablate pro-aging senescent cells, extending healthy lifespan of mice by over 25%. The startup Unity Biotechnology is further developing this strategy in human clinical trials.[39]

In early 2017, Harvard scientists headed by biologist David Sinclair announced they have tested a metabolic precursor that increases NAD+ levels in mice and have successfully reversed the cellular aging process and can protect the DNA from future damage. "The old mouse and young mouse cells are indistinguishable", David was quoted. Human trials were planned to begin shortly in what the team expect is 6 months at Brigham and Women's Hospital, in Boston.[40]

In the September of 2019, a group of scientists successfully reversed the epigenetic aging in humans
I suspect at least a few who voted for "No Freakin' Way" might reconsider to a "Maybe" if it meant also getting younger. It does add a wrinkle I don't mind
 
Old 12-17-2019, 12:22 PM   #17
Geist
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I am all for staying healthy for longer, but not necessarily living for longer.
Why change a winning formula? Limitation and invention, and all that.

Granted, this is also an invention...but the fewer drives one has, the more inert one becomes, until perfection is achieved, which also means complete ceasing of all activities, because all desires are met.
If the desires were not all met, then the organism is not perfect, yet.
To be perfect is to be fully inert, no more wants, no more needs, fully satisfied, there is nowhere else to goooooOoOo.

Or something like that.
 
Old 12-17-2019, 02:41 PM   #18
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The only way I would consider "immortality" is as data and that, obviously, has its own concerns from the Turing Police of William Gibson, to Bob the original Bob, to things like the Lucy Lieu bot of Futurama and the less humourous Black Mirror.
I am not, really, "that old" but things hurt and I've watched people as their bodies become implements of turture.
Sorry, did not mean to be negative but I have yet to see many truly "long, happy, lives".
 
Old 12-22-2019, 02:42 PM   #19
enorbet
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In case you missed it (I did until today) biological age reduction is no longer "just theoretical" nor just for mice...

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326329.php#1

On a speculative fiction note, how many here have read any of the "Ringworld" novels? Larry Niven's main character was hundreds of years old due to future medicinal drugs and he very imaginatively explored the pros and cons of very long life, one of which involved the "DNA Imperative" - Pass It On. Some condition of the treatment left the users sterile and Niven proposed that once it was impossible to "pass it on", Nature was essentially out to kill them. I actually prefer the view that Nature is not hostile. It's just impassive and chaotic.

There is no way possible humans can even imagine to actually be immortal because there is an upper limit. It appears that at some point many billions of years in the future our Universe itself will die off and dissipate into what we view as nothing. Unless there is a multiverse, and any exist that could support whatever human life is by that time, and if we can somehow crossover into it, and the Big If, even if Humanity can survive that long since Extended Life and "Eternal Youth" in no way implies the end of disease, accident or violence, well that's a whole lotta Ifs.

I think the injections in the initial post are way early and quite premature, but they are a first step and the fact that despite their extremely low chance of success they are even imaginably saleable at $1,000,000.00 a dose, means they are likely to generate income and profit and that is an extremely powerful force. At some point, and likely not very far off, there will very likely be drugs that maintain or reverse the process of biological aging and death on the most fundamental levels. I doubt I will live to see it but I have no hesitation for a few smaller ifs...

If I could manage to afford it, if the odds of success were high enough, I'd absolutely love to be able to look forward to, say, 1000 years. In fact, I imagine if (and maybe when) such processes become possible, once enough people have such long lifespans Life will seem even more precious and a far broader, more mature perspective would occur and of course it also implies new and very long term adjustments of which I imagine those hurdles and solutions would greatly motivate Humanity to find new worlds and expand beyond being tied irrevocably into the fate of our planet and that that would be a great benefit even for newborns. With a view to living for even 1000 years, the issues of "this year" seem much smaller and that "All Things Must Pass" view becomes like a sigh of relief rather than a looming sentence.

Happy Holidays All.
 
Old 12-22-2019, 05:51 PM   #20
Michael Uplawski
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Technical answers to anything but technical problems do not make sense. I will just not spent time on the question.
 
Old 12-23-2019, 02:34 AM   #21
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After thinking about it some more, I warmed up to the idea a bit, mostly for 'forensics' reasons, though.

People living longer makes it easier for witnesses to something bad to stay around for longer. Especially things related about dishonesty.
A lot of negative, scummy things in this world bank on memory holing, and with a more relaxed lifespan, people might care more about rememberance.

Not too much, though, I mean, this procedure does not make one bullet proof or anything, or able to escape some prison or other hindrance, but not all crimes are that singled out, anyway.

For political/social crimes and culture, this would help, unless maybe birth rates adjusted to the lifespan, then maybe things even out a bit again, with newer generations losing information the previous had.

A longer lifespan might give us things like: "Not so fast, sonny. I was there when it happened, those 400 years ago!" Etc.

Last edited by Geist; 12-23-2019 at 02:36 AM.
 
Old 12-23-2019, 04:10 AM   #22
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geist View Post
After thinking about it some more, I warmed up to the idea a bit, mostly for 'forensics' reasons, though.

People living longer makes it easier for witnesses to something bad to stay around for longer. Especially things related about dishonesty.
A lot of negative, scummy things in this world bank on memory holing, and with a more relaxed lifespan, people might care more about rememberance.

Not too much, though, I mean, this procedure does not make one bullet proof or anything, or able to escape some prison or other hindrance, but not all crimes are that singled out, anyway.

For political/social crimes and culture, this would help, unless maybe birth rates adjusted to the lifespan, then maybe things even out a bit again, with newer generations losing information the previous had.

A longer lifespan might give us things like: "Not so fast, sonny. I was there when it happened, those 400 years ago!" Etc.
I'm thinking that crimes would diminish. It's one thing to have 10-20 year sentences be common but quite another for 100-200 year sentences, let alone death sentences. Perhaps far more influential on such choices for crime, on one side I suspect people would be more care full about behaviors that would have adverse affects on their health when they have to live with them for a very long time, and on the flip side the economy would likely utterly change when large numbers of people have extended time to collect, invest, strive for well... everything.

The timing might be rather important especially during the initial transition when most people's lives are not extended and birth rates continue while death rates decrease. We would need room and resources. This might lead to undersea or underground cities and increased motivation to colonize other planets. At the same time this is occurring the increases in prosthetics may help diversify Humanity to live and work in specific different environments that would facilitate such migration and expansion.

I'm just speculating here but it seems to me the most important defining factor of Homo Sapiens, the one that has taken us from tree dwelling fruit eaters to the top of the food chain is adaptability. Adaptability influenced by "the longview" seems to me to be mostly beneficial.
 
Old 12-23-2019, 09:53 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
I'm thinking that crimes would diminish. It's one thing to have 10-20 year sentences be common but quite another for 100-200 year sentences, let alone death sentences. Perhaps far more influential on such choices for crime, on one side I suspect people would be more care full about behaviors that would have adverse affects on their health when they have to live with them for a very long time, and on the flip side the economy would likely utterly change when large numbers of people have extended time to collect, invest, strive for well... everything.
The reverse might also be true. Oddly enough last week's New Scientist Christmas Issue included a short story by a Chinese writer set in a near future in which gene resequencing allows people to live to 300 years or more. The problem is that the treatment is so expensive that only millionaires can afford it. The narrator is not a millionaire but he works for a finance house and is therefore in a position to embezzle a lot of money. He has set up a maze of software to protect himself from discovery in the short term, long enough for him to pay for and have the treatment (which is irreversible). He knows that he will be discovered eventually and sent to prison for quite a long time, but he reckons that it will be worthwhile as he will still have about 200 years of life ahead of him when he comes out. In fact he takes the view that such treatments make any crime other than a capital one worthwhile.
 
Old 12-24-2019, 02:12 AM   #24
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
The reverse might also be true. Oddly enough last week's New Scientist Christmas Issue included a short story by a Chinese writer set in a near future in which gene resequencing allows people to live to 300 years or more. The problem is that the treatment is so expensive that only millionaires can afford it. The narrator is not a millionaire but he works for a finance house and is therefore in a position to embezzle a lot of money. He has set up a maze of software to protect himself from discovery in the short term, long enough for him to pay for and have the treatment (which is irreversible). He knows that he will be discovered eventually and sent to prison for quite a long time, but he reckons that it will be worthwhile as he will still have about 200 years of life ahead of him when he comes out. In fact he takes the view that such treatments make any crime other than a capital one worthwhile.
While I don't doubt for a minute there would surface new crimes maybe even in addition to the old ones but I also think interviewing that Chinese fellow the first week in prison and every year after would soon discourage such "pie in the sky" tradeoffs. Just because one is in a position to develop a longview doesn't mean a minute or an hour is any shorter. I just think that over time and especially once the majority of anyone remaining alive are "long term" that a new maturity will surface as possibilities and consequences loom larger. There are more than a handful of people today who take comfort in expecting to not being around when Global Climate Change plays out. There are even some right here on this thread who approach nearly wishing for death to take them away from "this horrible world". I think that may still exist in some with longevity but far fewer as the world is progressively shaped to fit that longer, less reckless view.
 
  


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