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Old 06-04-2024, 12:55 PM   #46
business_kid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _blackhole_ View Post
macOS runs on x86 hardware and Apple (along with ARM) are one of the members of the UEFI Forum: https://uefi.org/members

Personally, I don't see Apple Silicon, which is a locked down and undocumented platform, as the answer to the Microsoft problem.
Well, being a hardware guy, I read a bit about the M1 & sequential cpus. They have a number of lesser cores tackling the daily grunt work, along with several top-of-the-line cores with a fabulous turbo speed. All on 3 nm wafer fab, the smallest cpu to date. Some fancy Neural & GPU stuff tops it off. They are very impressive hardware. They give the impression of being built to spec, not to budget. And with Asahi Linux, you can run Fedora Linux on it, admittedly with the suckage of systemd.
 
Old 06-05-2024, 08:52 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by rclark View Post
No one who examines all of the evidence should have any doubt of MS' intentions.

Once these mechanisms are put in place, the means to bypass them will be slowly but surely revoked as MS Windows evolves into a "software as a service" subscription based product, that comes with the hardware and that hardware will eventually only run Windows due to faux "security" measures which are in place to lock out alternatives.
 
Old 06-05-2024, 01:52 PM   #48
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As mentioned elsewhere on LQ forums (Shiny Things are Fun in General, Non-*NIX) by business_kid, this article about "hacker tool extracts all the data collected by Windows new Recall AI" should give plenty of people food for thought:

https://yro.slashdot.org/story/24/06...-new-recall-ai
 
Old 06-05-2024, 04:10 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachboy2 View Post
As mentioned elsewhere on LQ forums (Shiny Things are Fun in General, Non-*NIX) by business_kid, this article about "hacker tool extracts all the data collected by Windows new Recall AI" should give plenty of people food for thought:

https://yro.slashdot.org/story/24/06...-new-recall-ai
It stores data in an unencrypted database.

In 2024.
 
Old 06-06-2024, 02:54 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen View Post
It stores data in an unencrypted database.

In 2024.
It would be laughable if it were not so serious.
 
Old 06-07-2024, 11:58 AM   #51
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"Listening to and acting on customer feedback
Even before making Recall available to customers, we have heard a clear signal that we can make it easier for people to choose to enable Recall on their Copilot+ PC and improve privacy and security safeguards. With that in mind we are announcing updates that will go into effect before Recall (preview) ships to customers on June 18.

First, we are updating the set-up experience of Copilot+ PCs to give people a clearer choice to opt-in to saving snapshots using Recall. If you don’t proactively choose to turn it on, it will be off by default."

More here: https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexp...r-copilot-pcs/
 
Old 06-07-2024, 06:02 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjolnir View Post
"Listening to and acting on customer feedback
Even before making Recall available to customers, we have heard a clear signal that we can make it easier for people to choose to enable Recall on their Copilot+ PC and improve privacy and security safeguards. With that in mind we are announcing updates that will go into effect before Recall (preview) ships to customers on June 18.

First, we are updating the set-up experience of Copilot+ PCs to give people a clearer choice to opt-in to saving snapshots using Recall. If you donít proactively choose to turn it on, it will be off by default."

More here: https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexp...r-copilot-pcs/
Yeah, it'll be off by default initially... and then some random update will require it to be on, and will turn it on silently. One day you'll accidentally discover that it is on.

From that point, you can turn it off, but then it'll be silently turned back on with every update.

Microsoft is a company that knows how to boil frogs very well. They've been doing it for decades.
 
Old 06-07-2024, 06:50 PM   #53
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Anecdotally, my experience is that Windows' search is terrible at doing its job. This becomes painfully obvious when one gains experience with tools like grep (which is truly excellent at its job), and discovers that what can be found with grep in under a minute is still not found by Windows' search after ten minutes of thrashing your SSD.

To say that something needed to be done by Microsoft about Windows' search would be an understatement. If it sucked any more, Godfreys could have picked it up as a product line and perhaps saved their business.

Recall is just another thing that doesn't address the real problem, and another "feature" of Windows which will annoy techy types because of poor design and implementation. Another white elephant from Microsoft.

They should have put these resources into fixing Windows' search.
 
Old 06-08-2024, 05:35 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen View Post
...They should have put these resources into fixing Windows' search.
To be honest, I don't find Nemo, FSearch or other gui search apps for linux to be much better than File Explorer on Windows. I haven't of course tried them all and it has been quite some time since I have run a linux gui.
Grep is incredibly good from a terminal and I occasionaly use it in WSL on my Win 10 machine. In an effort to increase my versatility I often try to replicate grep's results with GET-STRING or other commandlets in Powershell. Findst is not as versatile from a Windows command prompt but old time DOS people could do just fine with it.
My hunch is that a powershell maven could go toe-to-toe with a grep aficionado in any real-world 'search' showdown.
 
Old 06-08-2024, 06:26 PM   #55
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No doubt. But findstr wasn't part of old-time DOS. It wasn't even part of Windows until 2k.

Anyhow, the point is that they could have done things differently instead of throwing money at an AI program that stores your bank logins in plain text for all of the world to find.
 
Old 06-09-2024, 02:27 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
What I find utterly weird is that most desktop/laptop users still use Windows. In spite of the spying and built-in advertisements, the compulsory extended updates, and (of course) the lousy security.

The Linux desktop community remains "we few, we happy few". I wonder why.
More terrible is the google android os on phones where you have no control. Spying bot agent.
 
Old 06-09-2024, 02:35 AM   #57
Turbocapitalist
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xeratul View Post
More terrible is the google android os on phones where you have no control. Spying bot agent.
It is all the more terrible because in many countries Android vastly outnumbers Windows deployments. If you count iOS and Android together then all countries are afflicted, not just many or most.
 
Old 06-09-2024, 06:48 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen View Post
No doubt. But findstr wasn't part of old-time DOS. It wasn't even part of Windows until 2k.

Anyhow, the point is that they could have done things differently instead of throwing money at an AI program that stores your bank logins in plain text for all of the world to find.
Correct, I guess I was thinking of dos 'find.' I agree that I have no need for ai assistance with search on my box. File Explorer is normally sufficient for my needs or if I need something more extensive I can pop open a bash or powershell terminal within seconds. My understanding is that you can opt out of 'Recall' in entirety and on a case by case basis filtering by website, application and can delete either all snapshots or snapshots within a specific time frame.
In the end, security for any operating system is dependent on we, the end-user. I don't find it a big deal to check my system settings after a os update.
 
Old 06-09-2024, 08:45 AM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjolnir View Post
Correct, I guess I was thinking of dos 'find.' I agree that I have no need for ai assistance with search on my box. File Explorer is normally sufficient for my needs or if I need something more extensive I can pop open a bash or powershell terminal within seconds. My understanding is that you can opt out of 'Recall' in entirety and on a case by case basis filtering by website, application and can delete either all snapshots or snapshots within a specific time frame.
In the end, security for any operating system is dependent on we, the end-user. I don't find it a big deal to check my system settings after a os update.
That encapsulates what I detest about windows. The system is designed to and defaults to #$&@%! things up unless you have developed sysadmin levels of knowledge and ability to configure it not to.
 
Old 06-09-2024, 04:21 PM   #60
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Similary with Windows 10/11 telemetry services, if you disable them, it breaks Windows update...
 
  


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