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Old 06-06-2017, 09:18 PM   #1
Barkester
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Question Laws, encryption/related outside US


How does this "law" thing work?

If the US is blocking the creation of high levels of encryption, how are they keeping people from just going cross-border and doing it under a different domestic law set as a Brit may enjoy Amsterdam?

I've gotta say, it looks like opportunity to me. Like they're giving the market away.

If a sponsored (paid) group were to work specifically towards the goal of a better open-source encryption(s), would Amerikan laws attempt to leap their borders as with Assange?

I see a great potential in several countries to do what Amerika won't.

Yet, I'm not alone in this world and others musta thought of it as well. Its not even very imaginative. Just pragmatism really. Whats stopping people? Law? Drones?

I'm sure countries like the US, Russia and China have government sponsored programs, but an open-source alternative is going to be critical for the future of all Linux users. Thousands of companies would surely back such an enterprise for the privilege of first copies. Money's there. Why is it not happening? Or happening so slow as to be useless?

Thx 4 ideas.
 
Old 06-06-2017, 09:43 PM   #2
sundialsvcs
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Lawmakers, like everybody else these days, are very much "feeling their way along." Communication has suddenly become both international and personal, and "John Q. Public" suddenly has a very legitimate need for strong encryption. But, laws change slowly and it is frankly very difficult to advise lawmakers as to what the laws should now be.

I submit, however, that "no matter where in the world you happen to be," the issues that apply to you are actually very similar. You communicate over the Internet. You do business there. And, you have law-enforcement authorities whom your country (state, community, etc.) have tasked with "catching bad guys" and "keeping you safe." Therefore, this still-very-new and very-ambiguous situation is universal, and there is not one "bright-line rule" to be found. Every coin has two sides. The issues are hard, and the solutions are harder.
 
Old 06-06-2017, 10:52 PM   #3
Doug G
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There is a long history of law regarding encryption by the US. Back in the "old days" the US laws made it illegal to export encryption outside the US. Laws have been easing ever since, and with the state of technology in many other countries, I doubt the US or any single nation can put the genie back in the bottle.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Export..._United_States
 
Old 06-07-2017, 09:08 AM   #4
sundialsvcs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug G View Post
There is a long history of law regarding encryption by the US. Back in the "old days" the US laws made it illegal to export encryption outside the US. Laws have been easing ever since, and with the state of technology in many other countries, I doubt the US or any single nation can put the genie back in the bottle.[/url]
Yes, and neither should anyone want to. At the time those laws were written, "the Internet" was ARPANet and MILNet. (As, in fact, it still is ...) We did not have the requirements that we do now, for civilians to transmit vast amounts of sensitive data over that same network. "Civilian uses" of cryptography, such as they were, did not have "national security" implications – as they do now. So, the old strictures simply don't make any sense anymore, and it is not at all clear that we actually could develop any sort of "strictures" to replace them, nor that we should even attempt it. We live in interesting times. Completely unprecedented times.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 06-07-2017 at 09:10 AM.
 
Old 06-07-2017, 12:56 PM   #5
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Some people quit due to slow progress. Never grasping the fact that slow progress... Is Progress.
 
  


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