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Old 12-28-2017, 02:28 AM   #1
rblampain
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Keeping self encrypting drive "on"


I was discovering the existence of self encrypting drives and was dismayed to learn that their main weakness is the simple need to maintain power on to access its files after having stolen its running host computer.
But what I cannot understand is the claim made in the same article that maintaining power on is much easier on a desktop than a laptop. I would have thought that it would have been the other way around since a laptop can run on its own battery.

Can someone explain why it is so (if the claim is correct)?

Thank you for your help.
 
Old 12-28-2017, 03:45 AM   #2
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rblampain View Post
need to maintain power on to access its files
isn't this true for ALL hard drives???

Quote:
after having stolen its running host computer.
you have stolen a computer? whose host?
and clearly the computer is running on batteries, if you were able to steal it and keep it running?
or is it a "running host"? what's that then?
 
Old 12-29-2017, 03:53 AM   #3
rblampain
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ondoho
Your propensity to distort was already annoying, now you are accusing someone of theft. You are going too far and I have clicked the "report" button. May be that will bring a bit of common sense to you.
 
Old 12-29-2017, 04:14 AM   #4
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rblampain View Post
I was discovering the existence of self encrypting drives and was dismayed to learn that their main weakness is the simple need to maintain power on to access its files after having stolen its running host computer.
...

Can someone explain why it is so (if the claim is correct)?

Thank you for your help.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rblampain View Post
ondoho
Your propensity to distort was already annoying, now you are accusing someone of theft. You are going too far and I have clicked the "report" button. May be that will bring a bit of common sense to you.
Where you not talking about "stealing" a computer??
 
Old 12-29-2017, 11:35 AM   #5
Mara
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rblampain, I would say that some people did not understand that you're talking about an article you've read. You could just explain it more. Or just link it..

jsbjsb001, if you look in the 2nd sentence of the first post, you have "But what I cannot understand is the claim made in the same article..."
 
Old 12-29-2017, 08:51 PM   #6
jefro
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There are some laptop drives that do encrypt and some that require the motherboard. Once the power is off the drive still has encryption on it. If it were to be stolen then it makes use of the data or hardware difficult to near impossible. I've not read this article you are speaking of. What is it?
 
Old 12-30-2017, 03:41 AM   #7
rblampain
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Thank you for the answer.
I did not keep track of the article which was about security relating to the (new to me) SED SSD and mentioned that the weakness was if somebody wanted to access data (encrypted under KEK) on such drive in somebody else's computer, they needed access to the computer in its powered state and keep it powered on. They could then access the unencrypted files normally as the legal user once in possession of the computer.

This made plenty of sense but the article continued explaining that against popular beliefs, maintaining power on a stolen computer was much easier to do on a desktop than on a laptop and this was the subject of my question since it would appear to anyone that maintaining power on a stolen laptop should be easier since it has its own battery.

Although the article was not intended to be a protection against the theft of computers, it seemed heavily written for that purpose and the loss of laptops. My objective was that, being all the time under the impression that my desktop could not be stolen (or confiscated by misguided or dishonest authorities) while kept under power, was utterly wrong and this was a misconception I wanted to rectify.

I think one probably needs to be an electrician to answer my question.

Regarding your suggestion "to explain it more" I think that my English is clear enough although it is not my mother-tongue and the posts above are from readers determined to make a "political" point or appear superior. If posting becomes too cumbersome because of that, I prefer to choose other sources of solution to my problems. The most damaging effect of such attitude is that the threat has not 0 answer and seems to have been answered to "surfers" of new posts in a hurry who prefer to find unanswered and therefore more difficult questions.

Last edited by rblampain; 12-30-2017 at 04:12 AM.
 
  


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