LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Latest LQ Deals
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 01-12-2022, 08:29 PM   #1
Xeratul
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Location: UNIX
Distribution: FreeBSD
Posts: 2,364

Rep: Reputation: 215Reputation: 215Reputation: 215
Is Google Phone listening and recording?


Hello,

It was said that in India, the phone may listen.

Is Google Phone listening and recording?

Here link:
https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/stop-g...oid-listening/

Wireshark and nmap on the IP phone will reveal several open ports. It is a fact.
Interesting would be to decrypt the information on those used ports by Google and manufacturers (and probably Govs too).

The best is that people will still continue to use Android Phone, but also even the web browser of Google, aka. Chromium, ... any kind of Google Cloud services.
Besides, MS cloud is not better.

Last edited by Xeratul; 01-12-2022 at 08:35 PM.
 
Old 01-13-2022, 10:08 AM   #2
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 9,547
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434
Many people are now quite certain that your phones and maybe even your thermostat or your refrigerator is listening all the time.

These days, cars are also on the Internet, and there's probably a tiny camera pointing straight at your face. The Government certainly knows exactly where you are at all times.

Various people have conducted experiments along these lines. For instance, talking "in the privacy of their own home" about a relative who had just died – who didn't exist. Then, observing how the advertising that they were exposed to changed. Suddenly they started getting grief-management and even funeral-planning messages. Others have done this with e-mails, with similar results.
 
Old 01-13-2022, 11:01 AM   #3
Xeratul
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Location: UNIX
Distribution: FreeBSD
Posts: 2,364

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 215Reputation: 215Reputation: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
Many people are now quite certain that your phones and maybe even your thermostat or your refrigerator is listening all the time.

These days, cars are also on the Internet, and there's probably a tiny camera pointing straight at your face. The Government certainly knows exactly where you are at all times.

Various people have conducted experiments along these lines. For instance, talking "in the privacy of their own home" about a relative who had just died – who didn't exist. Then, observing how the advertising that they were exposed to changed. Suddenly they started getting grief-management and even funeral-planning messages. Others have done this with e-mails, with similar results.
is that stuff legal?

well, since monitoring is done by GOV, the GOV makes the law and then decides what is right or not.

Then, human rights might or may still protect people. Hopefully.
Considering the human discriminations against people that aren't vaccinated against Covid-19 shows off, that there aren't much things, what humans can do to protect themselves (any longer).

Last edited by Xeratul; 01-13-2022 at 11:05 AM.
 
Old 01-13-2022, 11:18 AM   #4
smallpond
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2011
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Distribution: Fedora 34
Posts: 3,735

Rep: Reputation: 1092Reputation: 1092Reputation: 1092Reputation: 1092Reputation: 1092Reputation: 1092Reputation: 1092Reputation: 1092
Even if the base phone software doesn't do anything malicious, any app that you give rights to mic can do anything it wants. Avoid using software from anyone you don't trust.
 
Old 01-13-2022, 01:54 PM   #5
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 9,547
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434
"Legal?" Silly rabbit ... what do laws have to do with anything these days?

Laws are not meant to protect you. They're an excuse to let me lock you up when I want to get rid of you. But, if I want to do the same thing, I can get away with it because I call myself, "elite." And, if I've just got the cash, I can easily find a judge who will agree with me.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 01-13-2022 at 01:55 PM.
 
Old 01-19-2022, 05:06 PM   #6
JayByrd
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2021
Location: Seattle, WA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 136

Rep: Reputation: 113Reputation: 113
To answer the OP's question simply: yes, google is listening all the time!

As to the some of the other points made, I have to disagree. E.g.,
Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
These days, cars are also on the Internet, and there's probably a tiny camera pointing straight at your face. The Government certainly knows exactly where you are at all times
There's no probably about it--all new cars have a camera in the dash and microphones throughout the cabin. This does not mean, however, that it is the "government" that's spying on you. When it comes to surveillance, the "government" is a minor player--google, fb, apple, amazon, and microsoft are the heavyweights.

Consider this quote from google cofounder Larry Page in 2014:
Quote:
In general, having the data present in companies like google is better than having it in the government...because we care about our reputation. I'm not sure the government cares about that as much.
Does anyone remember a few years back when apple CEO Tim Cook made the rounds of all the yak shows to explain why apple was refusing to help the FBI look into the phone of the Pakistani terrorist who shot up an office in California, killing 15 people? He claimed to be standing up for his "users" against government surveillance.

These companies don't even believe in the concept of privacy, as it applies to us. But when it comes to the data that they harvest from us, they'll guard that so jealously as to side with a mass murderer. (In the end, the FBI went to an Isreali firm who cracked the phone without apple's help.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
"Legal?" Silly rabbit ... what do laws have to do with anything these days?
Laws are not meant to protect you...
This statement is overly broad, and does not reflect the reality. Of course, not all laws are protective, some are punitive. But there are plenty of laws (in the U.S. anyway) that are protective in nature. One need look no farther than the 4th Amendment to our Constitution. In addition, there are consumer-protection laws, anti-fraud laws, environmental laws, etc.

By ignoring this and claiming that laws in general are only there to aid in "locking us up," you seem bent on portraying our current state of affairs as being akin to the old USSR or East Germany. And while I may agree that our system is far from perfect, it has hardly devolved to that point.

One more example: the Telecommunications Act of 1934 specifically makes it illegal for the phone company to allow anyone, including the police, to listen in on a person's calls, short of having a legally valid warrant. The sad truth however, is that "big tech" has successfully argued that cell phones don't count as "telecommunication." They argue that they shouldn't be bound by that law since their phones provide "digital information service," not telecommunications. Thus the only people who are still covered by the Act are people like me who stubbornly cling to our old analog POTS phones! Meanwhile, apple and google are perfectly free to record everything you say on a "smart" phone.

Anyway, my main point is to stress that when it comes to "spying" on the people at large, corporate spying is a much more worrying development, in my opinion. Way back in 2001, when asked "What is google?", here's how Larry Page responded:
Quote:
If we did have a category, it would be personal information... The places you've seen. Communications... Sensors are really cheap... Storage is cheap. People will generate enormous amounts of data... Everything you've ever heard or seen or experienced will become searchable. Your whole life will be searchable.
For anyone who is interested in learning more about these issues, I highly recommend the book The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff.
 
Old 01-20-2022, 02:07 AM   #7
ondoho
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2013
Posts: 18,414
Blog Entries: 12

Rep: Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626Reputation: 5626
^ Well said, JayByrd!
Though I don't agree with Larry Page.
Also, the US (and other's) government is buying that data from Big Tech companies.
 
Old 01-20-2022, 02:16 AM   #8
hazel
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2016
Location: Harrow, UK
Distribution: LFS, AntiX, Slackware
Posts: 5,991
Blog Entries: 16

Rep: Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546Reputation: 3546
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayByrd View Post
One more example: the Telecommunications Act of 1934 specifically makes it illegal for the phone company to allow anyone, including the police, to listen in on a person's calls, short of having a legally valid warrant. The sad truth however, is that "big tech" has successfully argued that cell phones don't count as "telecommunication." They argue that they shouldn't be bound by that law since their phones provide "digital information service," not telecommunications. Thus the only people who are still covered by the Act are people like me who stubbornly cling to our old analog POTS phones! Meanwhile, apple and google are perfectly free to record everything you say on a "smart" phone.
That won't last for long. In the UK, it has been generally agreed (between the government and the telecomm companies) that POTS is going to be scrapped in the near future. But I don't think UK law allows digital phones to be tapped without a warrant.
 
Old 01-20-2022, 11:00 AM   #9
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 9,547
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434Reputation: 3434
The Telecommunications Act says that it is unlawful for a person to listen in on a conversation without a warrant. See the gigantic loophole? It doesn't say anything about speech-recognition software in the phone, in the phone company's switching equipment, in a thermostat or in your refrigerator.
 
Old 01-20-2022, 11:16 AM   #10
JayByrd
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2021
Location: Seattle, WA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 136

Rep: Reputation: 113Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
That won't last for long. In the UK, it has been generally agreed (between the government and the telecomm companies) that POTS is going to be scrapped in the near future.
Yeah, I figure the same is on the horizon for the U.S., as well. In fact, we've already passed the point where you can sign up for a new POTS connection. Only those who already have one have been grandfathered in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
But I don't think UK law allows digital phones to be tapped without a warrant.
Same here: digital phones can't be "tapped" by law enforcement without a warrant. My point was that the Act codified the idea that a person's phone conversations were indeed private--no one could eavesdrop on your calls without committing a felony. Digital phones, however, being exempt from the Telecommunications Act, allow google/apple/etc. to listen/harvest everything.

The new working model is that nothing is private anymore. The attitude of google and their ilk is that once anything has been "rendered" into data-bits, it's theirs for the taking. Conversations in your home or your car? Once the conversation has been digitized, it's no longer private--it's not even yours; whoever digitized it (google/apple/amazon) owns the "data." Your activity (or lack thereof) in your own bed? Again, the "smart mattress" renders that activity into zeros and ones, and now they own the information.

The latest example I've heard about is google signing a contract with Levi's to weave fiber-optic sensors into the fabric of new clothes--this will allow google to gather data on a person's physical movements and body-posture throughout the day...

It's a smart, smart world...
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: Recording live presentations, Part 3: Recording and troubleshooting LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-08-2017 04:16 PM
LXer: Listening to and recording audio and video streams with MPlayer LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 10-29-2007 01:50 PM
listening to cd's/recording cd's saposmak Linux - Hardware 4 09-16-2003 06:41 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:58 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration