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Old 06-18-2020, 04:04 AM   #1
jazzy_mood
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Interesting articles about RF exploits (AirHopper)


Just found this interesting article browsing the web: How Attackers Can Use Radio Signals and Mobile Phones to Steal Protected Data. Some extracts from the article:

Quote:
Computers housing the world's most sensitive data are usually "air-gapped" or isolated from the internet. They're also not connected to other systems that are internet-connected, and their Bluetooth feature is disabled, too. Sometimes, workers are not even allowed to bring mobile phones within range of the computers. All of this is done to keep important data out of the hands of remote hackers.

But these security measures may be futile in the face of a new technique researchers in Israel have developed for stealthily extracting sensitive data from isolated machines---using radio frequency signals and a mobile phone.
(...)
"With appropriate software, compatible radio signals can be produced by a compromised computer, utilizing the electromagnetic radiation associated with the video display adapter," the researchers write. "This combination, of a transmitter with a widely used mobile receiver, creates a potential covert channel that is not being monitored by ordinary security instrumentation."
(...)
[B]Although the distance for transmitting data from an infected computer to a mobile phone is limited---due to the limitations of the receiver in phones---attackers could use a stronger portable receiver, set up in a parking lot for example or installed on a drone flying overhead, to pick up data from greater distances
(The bold is mine).

This is anohter article (note that this is a serious research, not some random blog): https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6999418

This is a video showing the way the attack works (the targeted machine is using Linux/Ubuntu, so the OS doesn't seem to matter much):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OzTWiGl1rM

So, it seems it isn't necessary to have direct physical access to a computer in order to crack it any longer.

Besides being an interesting topic, this raises some questions: in the hypothetical case a security agency is targeting a criminal, or a criminal with access to this type of technology is targeting someone for whatever reason, could any type of computer/laptop or CPU/graphics card be compromised? Is this restricted to some type of devices/CPUs/graphic cards?

(I hope I don't irritate nitpickers and trolls - please excuse me in advance if this is so. In any case, anyone who may be irritated by my questions about this topic has the option to just ignore my thread and move on).

By the way, this info is from 2014, so I guess this technology could be much more advanced by now.
 
Old 06-18-2020, 04:26 AM   #2
hazel
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You should do an LQ search on this. I'm pretty sure I remember an earlier thread on it, and not everyone believed it was possible.
 
Old 06-18-2020, 09:50 AM   #3
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
You should do an LQ search on this. I'm pretty sure I remember an earlier thread on it, and not everyone believed it was possible.
No need to search, Hazel...the previous posts are from the OP:
https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...rk-4175668264/
https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...ux-4175666668/
https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...ut-4175654073/

Again, as with your other threads about those being 'obsessed' with hacking you (for some reason), what is the actual point of this? The answer is obviously "yes, it can hypothetically be done", and there are proof-of-concepts on MANY such things. Can even eavesdrop on a conversation by reading the flickering of a light bulb. Any of this ACTUALLY PRACTICAL or DOABLE in the real world?? Nope.

::EDIT:: And you seem to only want to post the parts that agree with you. From that article:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linked Article
....from an infected computer using radio signals generated and transmitted by the computer and received by a mobile phone. The research was conducted by Mordechai Guri, Gabi Kedma, Assaf Kachlon, and overseen by their advisor Yuval Elovici.

The attack borrows in part from previous research <SNIP> The researchers in Israel have developed malware that exploits this vulnerability by generating radio signals that can transmit from an infected computer....
(bolded for emphasis). Did you miss the part where they had to create special malware, then intentionally infect the computer to get this 'hack' to work??? And you still ignore the fact that you'd then need to get a cell phone to listen in for you, and send you the information to decode. All the links you posted are about the exact same thing, from the same source.


Your other user id (hungry_ghost) got banned, and this is nearly identical to your other 'rf exploitation' thread from earlier this year. Again, have had MANY posters with nearly identical things in the past year and a half; none with any evidence or proof, yet each time there is a sinister 'they' that's after them. And 'they' can always break into a system without it being plugged in, hack their phones/game consoles/tv's/etc., in SECONDS, even after a fresh OS load...yet somehow they're never skilled enough to not leave a trace, or do it without being caught.

People aren't irritated by questions or conversations; they're irritated by people who don't listen and want to spew conspiracy theories.

Last edited by TB0ne; 06-18-2020 at 11:17 AM.
 
Old 06-18-2020, 02:16 PM   #4
jazzy_mood
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I do listen, except when people are more concerned with personal attacks. And I never said anyone was hacking me through lightbulbs; I did say in a previous thread that, in addition to the hacking issues I am having, lightbulbs were flickering, which made me wonder if both facts were related. Don't twist my words.

You say it can hypothetically be done. My question remains: in the hypothetical case someone's cellphone was somehow infected, are all types of laptops, PCs, CPUs, etc., vulnerable to this type of attack? Just a technical, valid, hypothetical question... Out of curiosity. For learning purposes.
 
Old 06-18-2020, 02:38 PM   #5
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzy_mood View Post
I do listen, except when people are more concerned with personal attacks.
Please point out where you were personally attacked. And stating what you've done/said in the past isn't an 'attack'.
Quote:
And I never said anyone was hacking me through lightbulbs; I did say in a previous thread that, in addition to the hacking issues I am having, lightbulbs were flickering, which made me wonder if both facts were related. Don't twist my words.
Can't see where you mentioned anything about flickering lights or lightbulbs in any of your other 'hacking' threads. And I know you didn't mention it; I did. Again, to illustrate a point that there are a LOT of things that are theoretically possible, but 99.99x% of them never leave a lab environment. Recent story:
https://www.wired.com/story/lamphone...ration-spying/
Quote:
You say it can hypothetically be done. My question remains: in the hypothetical case someone's cellphone was somehow infected, are all types of laptops, PCs, CPUs, etc., vulnerable to this type of attack? Just a technical, valid, hypothetical question... Out of curiosity. For learning purposes.
Again, pretty much ANYTHING is hypothetically possible, but it is so unlikely as to be practically impossible.

AGAIN: you have not provided ANY proof/evidence AT ALL of you being 'hacked', either under this account or the other(s) you have created, despite being asked. Seems you are trying to shoehorn your cell-phone into things somehow, so you can continue with your claims. Sorry, no...just nothing there and there is nothing that a technical forum can help you with. It would be best to seek professional help from someone in the medical field, as I think they're more able to solve whatever problem you have.
 
Old 06-18-2020, 02:46 PM   #6
michaelk
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Yes, electronics just by their nature emit RF energy and in most cases are low enough not to interfere with other nearby devices and in the US their emissions are regulated by the FCC. Computer data buses being high frequency can be detected if close enough with the right equipment. This is not something new and has been around since the dawn of computers.

Using Penetration and cracking techniques is a lot easier to steal information then the above.

Last edited by michaelk; 06-18-2020 at 02:49 PM.
 
Old 06-18-2020, 03:29 PM   #7
jazzy_mood
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelk View Post
Yes, electronics just by their nature emit RF energy and in most cases are low enough not to interfere with other nearby devices and in the US their emissions are regulated by the FCC. Computer data buses being high frequency can be detected if close enough with the right equipment. This is not something new and has been around since the dawn of computers.

Using Penetration and cracking techniques is a lot easier to steal information then the above.
Thank you for the explanation. So I guess any type of devices/CPUs can be exploit by these means?

To answer tbone question to show proof, etc. This a link to a video of a website redirection (shortly after reformatting/reinstalling everything from scratch and resetting my router): https://streamable.com/gf15ri (by the way, the McAfee warning that shows up in the video was not legitimate; it said my protection was about to expire, but that was not the case; it was just a pop up). Yes, I guess you're going to say it's just a website redirection that can be caused by anything, but it is not normal it happens rights after reformatting, reinstalling, resetting the router, etc.

There's also this picture taken right after reinstalling Windows: https://ibb.co/zf1BHKM. I downloaded my Windows DVD copy dieectly from Microsoft (it's a legitimate copy; it reads gthe license from the motherboard), and I'm pretty sure it doesn't include Booking and Avast.

Another one of many instances when this has happened was when I was replying to a work email on the phone with the Gmail app and, suddenly, the font turned red and someone started writing in the reply area. I am very sorry for not taking any VIDEO PROOF about this; it's kind of hard to record any proof when you're busy working or replying to a work email and someone is hacking you, you know.

Last edited by jazzy_mood; 06-18-2020 at 03:35 PM.
 
Old 06-18-2020, 06:33 PM   #8
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzy_mood View Post
Thank you for the explanation. So I guess any type of devices/CPUs can be exploit by these means?
Not sure how many times you need to hear an answer. AGAIN: it is HYPOTHETICALLY possible so yes...AGAIN: it is so impractical as to be nearly impossible to implement outside of a lab setting.
Quote:
To answer tbone question to show proof, etc. This a link to a video of a website redirection (shortly after reformatting/reinstalling everything from scratch and resetting my router): https://streamable.com/gf15ri (by the way, the McAfee warning that shows up in the video was not legitimate; it said my protection was about to expire, but that was not the case; it was just a pop up). Yes, I guess you're going to say it's just a website redirection that can be caused by anything, but it is not normal it happens rights after reformatting, reinstalling, resetting the router, etc.
Really? Not 'normal' after you have **TOTALLY RESET** your browser settings back to default, to have a simple redirect? Especially when you visit a non-existing website that has a default page advertising things??? Would that be more likely, or is it a 'psychotic ISP', or a hacker??
Quote:
There's also this picture taken right after reinstalling Windows: https://ibb.co/zf1BHKM. I downloaded my Windows DVD copy dieectly from Microsoft (it's a legitimate copy; it reads gthe license from the motherboard), and I'm pretty sure it doesn't include Booking and Avast.
Really? Again, you are not really bolstering your case; people have been whining about booking and avast bloatware being included since early 2019. Microsoft forums are littered with complaints.
Quote:
Another one of many instances when this has happened was when I was replying to a work email on the phone with the Gmail app and, suddenly, the font turned red and someone started writing in the reply area. I am very sorry for not taking any VIDEO PROOF about this; it's kind of hard to record any proof when you're busy working or replying to a work email and someone is hacking you, you know.
..and the ONE THING that is actual proof is, of course...unavailable.

And again, your phone is somehow involved, and you have 'hackers' after you, personally, because:Anyone who can hack your computer when it's not connected to a network, through a powered-off router, and somehow reconfigure your BIOS and/or override your phone **IN REAL TIME** is NOT going to be able to be detected/caught. They aren't going to type while you're on, since they want to steal information. This enormous, gaping hole in your logic seems to escape you somehow.

And the most salient point for you would be: you are using Windows...ask for advice on a Windows forum for technical issues. Not sure what other professional help you need, but I hope you get it.

Last edited by TB0ne; 06-18-2020 at 06:35 PM.
 
Old 06-19-2020, 01:11 AM   #9
jazzy_mood
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Really? Not 'normal' after you have **TOTALLY RESET** your browser settings back to default, to have a simple redirect? Especially when you visit a non-existing website that has a default page advertising things??? Would that be more likely, or is it a 'psychotic ISP', or a hacker??
So, I am the one who doesn't listen. You obviously didn't bother to look at the video or are intendedly ignoring the part where I wrote www.youtube.com letter by letter, hit enter and the browser was redirected to a totally different website. As I said, this was on an almost fresh install. See? You are intendedly ignoring my questions and the proof you asked and making your own 'judgment'.

Definitely, there's no point arguing with you. By the way, it's really pathetic to occupy oneself to target people on a forum and attack them (thanks for taking the time to check my previous threads and all that). I guess you have way too much free time and have nothing else to do.
 
Old 06-19-2020, 03:36 AM   #10
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzy_mood View Post
Just found this interesting article browsing the web: How Attackers Can Use Radio Signals and Mobile Phones to Steal Protected Data.
Another victing of Alphabet & Google AMP.
Here's the real link if anyone's interested.

Like others said, yes, all this is possible, but not the most likely explanation in most cases.
That OP is "jumping to conclusions" is an understatement, maybe most apparent in this sad post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzy_mood View Post
This a link to a video of a website redirection (shortly after reformatting/reinstalling everything from scratch and resetting my router): https://streamable.com/gf15ri (by the way, the McAfee warning that shows up in the video was not legitimate; it said my protection was about to expire, but that was not the case; it was just a pop up). Yes, I guess you're going to say it's just a website redirection that can be caused by anything, but it is not normal it happens rights after reformatting, reinstalling, resetting the router, etc.
Particularly funny: someone entering "www.yotube.com" (sic), getting redirected to "ww1.yotube.com"? that's most likely happening on the yotube.com (sic) server and has nothing to do with your local machine.

jazzy_mood, I think you're being paranoid. There's really no other way to say this. You need help not here on LQ but from professionals of the human mind.

And thanks again to TB0ne for doing LQ research.
 
Old 06-19-2020, 07:49 AM   #11
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzy_mood View Post
So, I am the one who doesn't listen. You obviously didn't bother to look at the video or are intendedly ignoring the part where I wrote www.youtube.com letter by letter, hit enter and the browser was redirected to a totally different website. As I said, this was on an almost fresh install. See? You are intendedly ignoring my questions and the proof you asked and making your own 'judgment'.
Try again, and this time YOU may want to look at the video. You typed in "www.YOTUBE.com". Not "YouTube"...YOtube. (emphasis added) A non-existent website, as was told to you in post #8. Which is why you got that redirect/domain advertising page. Or did the hacker creep into your house and steal the "U" key from your keyboard?? You have still provided zero proof, and you cannot.

Yet I'm sure this is more of "Cassandra's Metaphor" https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...ml#post6074972 Yet oddly that does fit your situation PERFECTLY...from that page:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia Page
The Cassandra metaphor is applied by some psychologists to individuals who experience physical and emotional suffering as a result of distressing personal perceptions, and who are disbelieved when they attempt to share the cause of their suffering with others.
Note the "personal perception" part. And note the part about the psychologist.
Quote:
Definitely, there's no point arguing with you. By the way, it's really pathetic to occupy oneself to target people on a forum and attack them (thanks for taking the time to check my previous threads and all that). I guess you have way too much free time and have nothing else to do.
I have a good memory, and paranoid rantings tend to stick out. Finding your previous threads certainly takes no more than 30 seconds. Again, stating what you've done and said isn't an 'attack', but since you have zero proof and want to BELIEVE you're being hacked, there's nothing we can do.

Again, you're using Windows...PLEASE go to a Windows/Microsoft forum, and let them help you. And again, please seek additional help.

Last edited by TB0ne; 06-19-2020 at 11:53 AM.
 
Old 06-19-2020, 08:25 AM   #12
quickquestion111
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If you're in Mexico I highly doubt anyone there has the ability to hack air gapped systems.
 
Old 06-19-2020, 08:28 AM   #13
sevendogsbsd
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OP is not being hacked. Big history here, read TB0ne's post references.
 
Old 06-19-2020, 10:24 AM   #14
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quickquestion111 View Post
If you're in Mexico I highly doubt anyone there has the ability to hack air gapped systems.
Said the US american?
 
Old 06-19-2020, 03:11 PM   #15
quickquestion111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
Said the US american?
Correct.
 
  


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