LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-04-2021, 11:15 PM   #31
ondoho
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2013
Posts: 17,237
Blog Entries: 10

Rep: Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
a "skill" is still a "skill" regardless of who you've worked for or haven't worked for. In other words, if you look up the definition of the word "skill" (not that you yourself would need to), it means "the ability to do something". So for example, if I wanted to install some Linux distro, it's still the same process regardless of who is paying me for, if anyone at all is paying me or not paying me to do it for that matter - I can still DO IT and have done it many times now regardless of whether I'm doing it in employment or not.
I have learned that jobs require at least 2 sets of skills:
  • a general skill set that is common to any job
  • specialised skills (what you are calling "skill")
With all due respect, I think you are concentrating too much on the second part, when really you should be concentrating on the first. Which is what I, hazel, and a few others already said here.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
You are now supposed to troll through every one of them to decide if any of them even remotely match what you said you were looking for.
No, you're supposed to trawl through them. Help, the WWW is destroying language...
 
Old 05-05-2021, 09:47 AM   #32
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth, unfortunately...
Distribution: Currently: OpenMandriva. Previously: openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,869

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049
Quote:
Originally Posted by cynwulf View Post
...
If you've been unemployed for quite a while, then you night want to consider an IT support role with a smaller company, where entry may be easier. This will invariably involve MS Windows however. At work you have to be OS agnostic, no employer is interested in FOSS idealism. I have spent the last 15 years working with Windows exclusively, despite my distaste for it.
...
Like I was saying before, while I'd prefer to work with Linux, if Windows is the only option for IT related employment then it is what it is. So not much I can do about that in that case. In any case, the chances of finding an IT job working with Linux where I live is next to none anyway - IT support or developer jobs. So I'd have no choice but to be open to that in that case.

Thanks for your advice cynwulf.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
...
The OP writes a whole lot of text that mostly concerns ... himself.
...
Well who else was I supposed to talk about sundialsvcs? Yourself? Well you're no stranger to posting a lot more than just the one or two liner yourself remember, so not sure I'd be criticizing others too much for doing the same if I were you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
...(Hint: "think local.")
...
I've already said that it isn't just about the employment side of things, it's also about the need for a new environment - not sure how many times I need to say it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
Advice here is based on 35 years of experience. There are no ill wishes or intentions.
I have no doubt about your experience or intentions, if I did, I wouldn't even bother responding to you. Neither of those things is the issue here, so I'm quite happy to take your word for both of those things (and I don't see what point there would be on your part to lie about any of that). So I believe you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
Nor any concerns, opinions, or emotions about any former interactions.
Well, clearly you were in fact talking about my past programming threads, and clearly did directly assert that I "resisted" and/or "ignored" your advice for one. And clearly at least some of your advice was in fact based on past interactions in those same threads (that you clearly did in fact respond to) - so let's be real here.

Once again, and as I said before, I had to prioritize which advice to took first, and you're also forgetting that there was a reason why the concepts took longer than I would have liked to learn. You know as well as I do I had the added complication of having to improve my mathematical skills before the concepts really started to make sense (which is another reason why I don't agree your comments about me "resisting" advice were fair). So to that end, both yourself and particularly astrogeek quite correctly said that I needed to improve my mathematical skills in order to be able to get a proper handle on the underlying concepts. Now I will freely admit (because it's true) that at least in the very beginning I was hoping that I could just learn the concepts and then move on to design that you were talking about. But clearly that wasn't going to work, I realized this and with some help privately started to try and improve my mathematical skills to make things easier. And you know what? Once I took that advice to improve my mathematical skills, things did not only become far clearer, but also far easier to learn. The point? If I didn't take the advice about improving my mathematical skills, I would *not* have been able to learn what I've learnt since about the concepts, as it would *not* have been possible. And I have both yourself and particularly astrogeek to thank for not only recognizing that, but therefore by extension suggesting that to me, as that's directly lead to understanding certain things I didn't understand before. I'm not trying to flatter you either, I'm serious, and that's the truth. It's the same point about understanding the underlying concepts and features, *before* I could start getting a handle on the design side of things. So now that I AM in a much better position to focus on the design side of things, I CAN have a far better chance at understanding your design related advice. Whereas before, I simply was *not* in a position where I could do that when I was still somewhat unclear about the underlying concepts - I'm *not* just making this up RT. Understand now? Cool?

I must also say that you seem to think because someone learns in a different way to you that they must be "ignoring" advice, and/or have an inability to learn. With all respect, I think you are very wrong about that, in fact, I know you are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
After a certain point in this thread, the best I had, and continue to have is, "Best wishes with your endeavors". That's intended to be a polite way of saying I have no further advice.
Well like I said above, it's not your intentions that is the issue here, it's the way you framed your posts and comments. Now before I get into that, I'm not asking you to "sugar coat" anything. As you know, I'm as direct as anyone at LQ is, regardless of who it is I'm talking to, you know that as well as I do. So I can hardly complain about someone else being direct and to the point, and since I try my very best *not* to be a hypocrite, I'm not going to complain about anyone else being direct. So that's fine, be my guest, not the issue either.

The issue is, when you make comments like the following:

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
...Everyone realizes that an entry level person doesn't know much, but if they demonstrate a continued inability to learn and work with people, they're not going to go far. These tendencies are seen with your programming threads, you seem to show resistiveness to suggestions from highly experienced persons and instead reply with great verbosity an explanation as to how they seem to not understand where you're coming from. The point there is someone of fairly good background with design and programming is helping you to accomplish your goal, not there to battle with you about how you learn or have to approach things, instead most will conclude it's a lost cause. ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
...You haven't worked in any of these types of jobs, so you have no experience.
...They will have to go by your stated skill set since you have no significant formal training and no experience.
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
...
Today? I bet you'd be very hard pressed to find a job posting in programming or IT that doesn't say "B.S. degree required, M.S. preferred"
...
If you're older, never going to go to college, suggest you seek a different career.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
...

@jsbjsb001,

Best wishes with your endeavors.
...most people I know would interpret that as meaning:

- Well clearly you ignore advice given.
- Clearly you're not able to learn.
- You don't have any skills or experience whatsoever of any kind.
- You don't have a CS degree.
- You are therefore not suitable for any kind of employment in the IT industry.
- Therefore just forget about it and go and pick fruit or some other meaningless, menial, minimum wage job that nobody else wants to do and be happy.
- Best of luck, because you're going to need it!

...that's pretty much how your comments would likely read to most people I know, that's the issue, regardless of your intentions. The point is: and if I may quote cynwulf here, Alan Sugar/Donald Trump style responses aren't anymore helpful than giving someone false hope that "they can do anything!". Not to mention that it's just not true, they are the issues RT, not your experience or intentions.
 
Old 05-05-2021, 12:39 PM   #33
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 9,315
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371
You fill in an awful lot of gaps with very incorrect assumptions.
 
Old 05-05-2021, 01:57 PM   #34
business_kid
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware, RPi OS, Mint & Android
Posts: 12,851

Rep: Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677
Let's concentrate the mind, jsbjsb001

Are you working right now? If not, are you studying or what?

Forget everything, you have to have a paycheck coming in by July or you'll be fired out on the street: what job would you go for and why?
 
Old 05-05-2021, 09:54 PM   #35
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 9,140
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227
"You're defensive, jsbjsb001 ..." But who, or what, are you defending against?

You're quite going out of your way to "prove your point." But, what exact point are you trying to prove, and for what purpose?

To put it another way – "why, exactly, have you now approached this online community?" What, specifically, do you now ask of us, and what, specifically, can we do for you?
 
Old 05-06-2021, 12:28 AM   #36
ondoho
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2013
Posts: 17,237
Blog Entries: 10

Rep: Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160Reputation: 5160
Quote:
Originally Posted by business_kid View Post
Are you working right now? If not, are you studying or what?
Or, to put a slightly broader frame on it: what sort of work experience do you have at all?
That's the elephant in the room, isn't it.
 
Old 05-06-2021, 10:32 AM   #37
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth, unfortunately...
Distribution: Currently: OpenMandriva. Previously: openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,869

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
You fill in an awful lot of gaps with very incorrect assumptions.
I haven't disputed everything you've said, nor have I said that everything you've said is somehow wrong. I've even agreed with at least some of what you've said. It's your characterization of my past programming threads in particular (among a couple of other things) that is the issue here, not your employment or other experience or intentions. I've once again said that I don't doubt either of those things on your part - I'm sure your intentions are "pure" as it were. I'm sure you have/are worked/working as a programmer, which is arguably a job in the IT industry, is it not? So not sure why you are reacting like I've somehow said everything you've said is wrong or some such. It's the assumptions on your part that are causing my responses in regards to some of your characterizations of me, whatever skills and/or qualifications I have or supposedly need.

Let me tell you a true story; some years ago now I applied for one of the rare IT support jobs there is where I live. I even got a face to face interview with the employer, but ultimately didn't get the job. In retrospect and looking back on it now, I can see why I didn't get the job; I wasn't ready for that sort of job at the time, the employer obviously saw this as well. I don't blame the employer for not giving me the job, as easy as that would be for me to do. They were right in fairness to them, and in at least some ways I'm kinda glad they did reject me. They knew I didn't have a CS degree or anything even remotely similar before they asked me to meet them for an interview, as I don't have any degrees on my resume because I don't have any degrees of any kind to my name. They also flat out said to me, "I'm not going hire someone just because they have certifications, I've done that before and they couldn't do the job. I want someone who can think outside the box." The point? That's why I wasn't ready for it at the time. That's also why I don't disagree with you about certifications, and will even add to what you said, in that: it's all well and good looking good on paper, but if you don't have the skills to do the job; what's the point in them hiring you or even applying for it in the first place? So yes, I do agree with you about that. And again, I'm not making that story up either - it really did happen.

So how am I saying everything you've said is wrong?

Quote:
Originally Posted by business_kid View Post
...
Are you working right now? If not, are you studying or what?
No, not currently working. Well as I've said earlier on in this thread and one of my previous programming threads; I am looking at doing a programming course, but once again, it's the cost of it that's the issue. Some of the total cost is covered by the government's JobTrainer funding, but I still have to pay the rest of the cost myself, but obviously don't have the money to fully cover the difference. So not sure that's going to happen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by business_kid View Post
Forget everything, you have to have a paycheck coming in by July or you'll be fired out on the street: what job would you go for and why?
Well obviously if I was already working it would be easier to find another job, particularly if I didn't care what job it was.

Like I said before, I've been there and done that in terms of doing a job just for the money that I had zero interest in, it didn't last for very long as I just couldn't do it mentally - even if it did mean going on the dole by quitting it. And quite honestly, when you get used to having no money, you just get used to it - it's hard to miss what you don't have anyway if you will. Don't get me wrong, it's no life (which is why people that call it a "lifestyle" clearly have never been on the dole) and you can only really survive and that's it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
"You're defensive, jsbjsb001 ..." But who, or what, are you defending against?
I've already explained why I've said what I've said in regards to what you are calling "defensive". I'm not going to keep explaining it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
You're quite going out of your way to "prove your point." But, what exact point are you trying to prove, and for what purpose?
No, I'm not trying to prove any point, but then again, not really sure what you mean by that anyway I will admit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
To put it another way "why, exactly, have you now approached this online community?" What, specifically, do you now ask of us, and what, specifically, can we do for you?
Because your average forum exists where people asking questions and/or post threads for members of said forum to discuss. Example? Here we are...
 
Old 05-06-2021, 10:51 AM   #38
business_kid
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware, RPi OS, Mint & Android
Posts: 12,851

Rep: Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677
jsbjsb001, we have a saying over here, beloved by Irish tradesmen about people who have the theory, but not the practise.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irish Tradesmen
He talks a good job
Get doing something - anything. It's much easier to leverage wrong experience than to convince folks that you're a worker. ATM you're an unknown. Get doing something. My son did 3 years in Pizza hut by nights while he went through College. After sticking that for 3 years he could get any waiter's job he wanted, and he could (and did) leverage that experience to show he was a worker.
 
Old 05-06-2021, 04:59 PM   #39
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 9,315
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371Reputation: 4371
You mentioned that you went on an IT interview some years ago. That's great, and it is exposure to a hiring manager where you got to see what their needs for the job are, as well as learned that they wanted you to have some level of experience.

From that point, my best recommendation would be to figure out if there's any way where you can attain experience which an employer like this would recognize.

Do you think there are any opportunities to volunteer somewhere, where you could help to set-up or maintain systems, servers, and networks? Preferably with someone senior there who can (a) give you some on the job training, and (b) give you a recommendation which you can use the next time you're able to get a job opportunity?

Ideally, you get to a point where you gain an interview, and the persons you've been helping are fine with providing references. I've seen situations, not necessarily in IT, but where a person accepts a volunteer role so they can gain experience and knowledge, they get an interview for a real job, and their mentor gives a great recommendation, along with one of the potentially nicest things they could say, "Sure you should hire them! That bums me out, because I'll be losing them! But, I can't pay them and they really deserve better!"

To me, that's where you want to be. How you get there is maybe these ideas, or maybe some other method. Just a suggestion.
 
Old 05-07-2021, 11:43 AM   #40
leclerc78
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2020
Posts: 67

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I don't know where you live, but according to your OP, it must be NOWHERE (the Outback of Australia !). Make it NOW HERE instead.
In any bad situations we can make good things out of it.
Who knows ? Maybe one day, if I still live up to that day, you can become a Head Security for ADF, a Zen Master ...
Good luck and most important, don't give up.
 
Old 05-07-2021, 11:59 PM   #41
Trihexagonal
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2017
Location: Parts Unknown
Distribution: FreeBSD
Posts: 210

Rep: Reputation: 264Reputation: 264Reputation: 264
jsbjsb001, I've never worked in IT or any computer related field or made any money whatsoever from anything computer related I've done online or offline. The first computer I ever laid fingertips to was an AppleII in '93 on a Friday afternoon when I showed up on a new job as a Weekend House Parent at a Group Home for high functioning Developmentally Disabled Individuals.

I was a 10th Grade High School Dropout, got my GED when I was 32 and wasn't recognized as a QMRP, Qualified Mental Retardation Professional, in Illinois, as in Missouri. The "Qualified" meaning so much of my time on the job and training received was counted as seat time.

I've seen and done things a college grad has at best read about. Can walk into any situation and take control at some point where they would be lost as what to do and eaten alive with skills that can make me a counselors worst nightmare. Everybody else there were snooty college grads or in college, the Q handed me a floppy in an offhand way like "Good luck with that". I would have rather blown my head off on the spot than tell her I had never touched a computer in my life.

By Monday morning I owned it, had looked at the data on all their floppy disks and printed out what I wanted. A love poem a girl had written to the guy who took over for me from 10pm-6am to humiliate him. When they upgraded to newer one I picked it up, set it up and had to show them how to boot it up by flipping the floppy during the boot process. Now I teach other people to use FreeBSD.

The best job I ever had was when I quit the Mental Health field for a time when I was 21 to become a Union Laborer at an iron foundry working around 2300F degree molten iron swinging a sledge hammer or scooping sand all night long. I've been a diecaster working with molten aluminum, magnesium and zinc. Went back into Mental Health with most of my time spent in Management positions after working my way up the Ladder of Success. Only to find I liked the climb, but it sucked for the most part once I got up there. That's where all the dirt is. You just can't see it from ground level.

I finished off my Time of Toil as a landscaper working for a guy who had a contract to mow all the Army Corp. of Engineers land on each side of the Mississippi River between Saverton, MO. and East Alton, IL., were they found an average of one dead body a week in the area I mowed. At Union Scale wage from 6am to greet the dawn until 10pm that night using headlights to see. That was a good job with all the sunshine and exercise you could handle.

I understand your reasoning for posting about your past history and don't fault you. Please consider my advise to apply for Social Security Disability, and find a lawyer who will take your case on Consignment (if you don't get paid he doesn't get paid) before the first time you apply and have him help you out doing it. That is most important.

The System is there for a reason. Make it work for you and life will be much better for you. I did or I wouldn't be giving you this advise.

Last edited by Trihexagonal; 05-08-2021 at 12:02 AM.
 
Old 05-14-2021, 04:37 AM   #42
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth, unfortunately...
Distribution: Currently: OpenMandriva. Previously: openSUSE, PCLinuxOS, CentOS, among others over the years.
Posts: 3,869

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049Reputation: 2049
While maybe a couple of members responses have been helpful (although a lot of them I could have, and did, thought/think of myself) both before and since my last reply, and as much as I could respond to the replies made since my last post; I really don't have the mental energy to anymore.

Either way, it seems I asked the wrong question (and yes, my own fault for that one), since had I asked "can people give me a list of reasons as to why it seems utterly pointless to even ask such a question here, let alone why is it pointless in even trying? And why am I totally screwed?"... most of the replies would have been spot on.

In any case, I'm done with this thread now as it's pointless to continue with it...
 
Old 05-14-2021, 06:00 AM   #43
Ser Olmy
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2012
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,063

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
In your first post you asked for advice on how to start a career in IT, either programming or support/operations. You provided the following information:
  1. You have a keen interest in computers
  2. You have almost no formal qualifications
  3. You have limited skills
  4. You have no relevant job experience
  5. You live in a rural area with few opportunities, and are considering moving to another place
  6. Mentally, you're not in the best place right now
The short answer is:
  • Figure out whether you'd like to work with software development, support or operations (they require very different skillsets)
  • Acquire some relevant skills that can be documented
  • Get some low-level job experience while you're working on your skills (anything is better than nothing)
  • Create a good-looking CV
  • Turn up at job interviews well-prepared and with a positive attitude (which you may have to fake, but that's OK)
Can you do this? Almost certainly.

Are your current plans/ambitions grounded in reality? I'd say almost certainly not, but that's OK. We all have to reorient ourselves a few times during the course of our lives.

I've worked in IT for almost 30 years. I've been the department head for a consulting business, and I've been on hiring committees on numerous other occasions. I've read more job applications and CVs than I care to remember, and what it all comes down to is perfectly encapsulated by this short exchange from the movie "Aliens":
Quote:
Ellen Ripley: Hi, I feel like a kind of fifth wheel around here, so is there anything I can do?
Sgt. Apone: I don't know. Is there anything you can do?
The applicant had to show me his or her skills/credentials. If I couldn't tell from the application or CV that this person was clearly qualified for the job, I just wouldn't consider that candidate at all.

Get some experience and some marketable skills, and you'll be fine. But if you focus on your past and insist that experienced IT people are all wrong and just don't understand your supposedly very unique circumstances, you won't be.
 
Old 05-14-2021, 07:37 AM   #44
dc.901
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2018
Location: Atlanta, GA - USA
Distribution: CentOS/RHEL, openSuSE/SLES, Ubuntu
Posts: 927

Rep: Reputation: 333Reputation: 333Reputation: 333Reputation: 333
Full disclosure, I do not live in Australia, and never been. So, no idea on cost of living etc from where you are now to Sydney or Melbourne.
- You prefer Linux over Windows.
- You want to move but do not have enough money to simply move without job lined up?

I did a search for "remote it support jobs in Australia": https://au.indeed.com/Remote-Technical-Support-jobs

So, personally - I would apply to some of the jobs available. I would also focus on remote jobs because that way, once I have income coming in, that would help with moving to another city.

Yes, initially with this method you may have to settle with Windows job, but as you said, Melbourne/Sydney more IT jobs are available, so after moving you can switch jobs - and by that time you will also gain experience that you can put on resume.

On personal note: Sorry to hear that you had to go thru some rough things in your life - my well wishes to you for bright and better future!

Last edited by dc.901; 05-14-2021 at 07:42 AM.
 
  


Reply

Tags
employment, ict, jobs, linux, moving


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] Print stdout and stderr to screen + log file and catch any errors in shell script idaham Linux - General 3 03-28-2013 06:43 AM
I'm not sure how this happened but I'm sure there is a lesson in there somewhere mreff555 Linux - Newbie 6 09-24-2012 02:09 AM
Hotkey Event not catch if I do not open KSystemLog first (Samsung N150P) emercier Linux - Kernel 0 03-04-2011 12:44 PM
Bash script: catch file not found error and send to /dev/null noir911 Programming 7 04-24-2010 08:37 PM
why not use try and catch? lindylex Programming 5 01-21-2008 06:10 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:40 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration