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Old 03-13-2020, 09:48 PM   #46
vtel57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnturn View Post
I found that WinXP did a good enough job of trashing itself without the need for Service Pack installations. It did that one time too many for me and I stopped using it---too many headaches.

Amen to that!
 
Old 03-14-2020, 05:34 PM   #47
That Random Guy
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My reason for posting this was because I feel like I'm not prepared to be a Linux sysadmin even though I really like open-source.

I've heard people say not to do what you like for a living 'cause you'll learn to hate it.

Yet, I still feel like this is probably the only thing that will give me a leg-up when it comes to the competition that is the labor force.

I don't know LVM by heart, I can't recite to you the entirety of SELinux man pages much less any man page, I'm still not 100% sure on the arguments I'm to give when using dd to create swap, etc.

I wanted to know if there's such a being here who managed to reach Linux-enlightment such that in a short amount of time was somehow able to become a Linux guru of the 1st order.

'Cause right now, that's what's holding me back from trying a Linux position. I can understand some basics, but I've never had to manage a Linux environment before.

Based on the responses I've seen so far, I feel like I can actually just give it a go now since it doesn't look like I need to be a Linux specialist/SME in just about every open-source project.

I feel like I know the defacto packages and tools used for certain jobs/tasks but again, I'm not a know-it-all. I will see what I can get.

Thanks!

Last edited by That Random Guy; 03-15-2020 at 08:17 AM. Reason: typo; grammar
 
Old 03-15-2020, 04:08 AM   #48
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That Random Guy View Post
I've heard people say not to do what you like for a living 'cause you'll learn to hate it.
True enough, but the opposite isn't much better: waiting to get home from your job so you can do what you really like doing. Splitting your (creative) energy between job and hobby.
It's a conundrum, a catch 22 sort of situation.
 
Old 03-15-2020, 11:11 AM   #49
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That Random Guy View Post
I've heard people say not to do what you like for a living 'cause you'll learn to hate it.
There are also many who say "Take a job at what you love and you'll never work a day in your life". It seems to me the difference between the two is in autonomy. If you are under the thumb of either some arrogant despot of a boss or must cave in to customer demands you might grow to hate it but if you have the power to make important choices and explain to your clients why it is in their interests to listen to an expert, you, that is a joy.

I have many interests and for several years I owned and ran an antique furniture and art restoration shop because I love working in woods and finishes. To head off unreasonable demands I made a sign which read

Quote:
Originally Posted by MySign
Low Prices!
Fast Delivery !!
High Quality !!!
.....
Pick Two.
Quote:
Originally Posted by That Random Guy View Post
I wanted to know if there's such a being here who managed to reach Linux-enlightment such that in a short amount of time was somehow able to become a Linux guru of the 1st order.

'Cause right now, that's what's holding me back from trying a Linux position. I can understand some basics, but I've never had to manage a Linux environment before.
I am by no means a "Linux guru" let alone "of the 1st order" but I did design, install and maintain several small business networking systems (largest one being around 200 workstations) based first in OS/2 and later in Linux and I never once had an unscheduled reboot or compromise beyond a single workstation screwed up by an ignorant employee. The servers worked perfectly and were easy to maintain and my clients were very pleased giving me complete autonomy once I demonstrated our interests were the same, an efficient work environment.

The point is you don't have to know it all, just the parts that apply to the job and enough more to be able to grow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by That Random Guy View Post
Based on the responses I've seen so far, I feel like I can actually just give it a go now since it doesn't look like I need to be a Linux specialist/SME in just about every open-source project.

I feel like I know the defacto packages and tools used for certain jobs/tasks but again, I'm not a know-it-all. I will see what I can get.

Thanks!
Whatever you decide I wish you the best of fortune but all signs appear to support a background in Linux is only becoming more valuable as the years pass. If you enjoy it that's frosting on the cake and your clients or employers will see this in your demeanor and that is very attractive.
 
Old 03-15-2020, 06:45 PM   #50
dave555
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How did you learn Linux?

Lot's of reading and using it as my main OS. Linux is the best OS in the world...

 
Old 03-24-2020, 09:37 AM   #51
martin smith
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If you want to learn fast go for a "hard" and well-documented Doing things yourself is the best way to learn the Arch wiki is spectacular and a great learning resource. But of course Arch isn't the best and good source to learn
 
  


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