LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 02-24-2020, 09:34 AM   #16
BW-userx
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Sep 2013
Location: Somewhere in my head.
Distribution: Slackware FreeBSD Win10 MX
Posts: 9,857

Rep: Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120Reputation: 2120

How did I learn Linux?

mail order...

installing it. finding a need to do something with it, then figuring out how to do that something via LQ (mostly as far as forums go) and internet searching.

Last edited by BW-userx; 02-24-2020 at 09:35 AM.
 
Old 02-24-2020, 10:25 AM   #17
Samsonite2010
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2015
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 247
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 110Reputation: 110
For me, I was running a dual-boot Windows 7/Linux machine and tried to do everything in Linux where possible. Started off using Windows only for some games and Outlook (for work), but then discovered Web mail worked better than Outlook and Steam came out on Linux, then I never booted into Windows again. Years later I built a new PC for Linux-only and that was that. I pretty much just used online resources to answer any questions (and forums like this one).
 
Old 02-24-2020, 06:59 PM   #18
andigena
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2019
Location: Western USA
Distribution: Debian, Slackware
Posts: 122

Rep: Reputation: 64
So many people here are old timers - I feel embarrassed at my relative lack of experience! I've only been using Linux for... five years, I think? Most of that was off and on, but I'm currently using exclusively Linux on desktop and I don't plan on changing that in the future unless required to by work.

Warning: this is a long post. TL;DR: I have some background in Linux, but I've only been a serious long-term user for 3 to 9 months depending on how you want to define "serious." Learned by using the system, doing Linux from Scratch, and reading a ton of stuff online.

Anyway, I got interested in Linux however many years ago and became intrigued with SUSE Studio, as I liked being able to customize my system but I was pretty much a technical novice (I wouldn't even have considered Debian at the time, much less something like Slackware or Gentoo). I messed up a number of times trying to do things with Linux initially, which is alright with me because it helped me learn a lot. I ultimately gave up on trying to make a usable system with SUSE Studio and tragically went back to Windows. About a year later, I tried Ubuntu and Linux Mint on what was my laptop at the time (each for a few weeks to a month, if I recall correctly), but I ultimately ended up being unable to connect to the internet after those few weeks of use, oddly enough. Went back to Windows again simply because I had to - I was taking online courses at the time, so I needed internet access, and I didn't have the willpower, technical knowledge, or resources to fix the internet issues. I did get a good foundation in the basics of Linux systems from this experience, even though I had to leave it for a while.

I think I spent a year or so on Windows uninterrupted after that, but then I built a desktop computer for myself and installed Ubuntu MATE on it. I liked it quite a bit but ultimately FUBARed that install (don't remember the details of how), and I ended up replacing it with a semi-legitimate copy of Windows yet again, which I want to say was in the summer of 2017. I was using Windows up until summer 2019, at which point I got fed up with Windows lagging and simply not working. I think the last straw for me was its completely horrible Bluetooth management - I spent hours trying to manually connect Nintendo Switch controllers to it one night and it annoyed me to no end.

So I reinstalled Ubuntu on my desktop in July, which I stuck with until just December. I also remembered the fun I had with SUSE Studio and remembered hearing about Linux from Scratch long ago, so I decided to try going through the LFS book. I got through that and some of BLFS, although I ultimately stopped because of the sheer amount of work involved in creating a usable desktop system. That process taught me a ton about "under the hood" operations and compiling from source, and also made me way more confident with Linux. I ended up reading a lot of extra Linux blogs and whatnot because I fell in love after doing LFS.

I had to keep Windows on my laptop up to December because I didn't want to deal with potential hardware and networking issues that would result from Linux while trying to complete assignments on time, but I decided to install Debian (chose it over my desktop Ubuntu because my laptop is terrible in terms of hardware and Debian is somewhat lighter, plus I like its philosophy). I liked it so much that I replaced my desktop Xubuntu installation with Debian. A few weeks ago, I also installed Slackware on an old desktop to use at work (the computer from which I am posting right now), partly because it's very lightweight and partly because I wanted to see what the very warranted fuss was about. I've already learned a lot about networking, the kernel, and scripting just by using Slackware in that short period of time, the networking part being because I was trying to connect to an Ethernet port that I found out was disabled. It's been a wild ride and I can't wait for it to continue.

So yeah, there's a comprehensive history of me and Linux. Gripping, I know.
 
Old 02-24-2020, 07:18 PM   #19
vtel57
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: VPN Tunnel, USA
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2
Posts: 1,357

Rep: Reputation: 338Reputation: 338Reputation: 338Reputation: 338
> I feel embarrassed at my relative lack of experience!

Don't be. We were ALL there at one time. Even Linus had to learn Linux.
 
Old 02-25-2020, 01:40 PM   #20
scasey
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2013
Location: Tucson, AZ, USA
Distribution: CentOS 7.7.1908
Posts: 4,558

Rep: Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645Reputation: 1645
I've pretty much always been a 7th-layer guy, creating and maintaining applications/programs that run at the "top" layer, between the 'puter and the user. In that sense, I'm not sure I've "learned" Linux. It's just another platform on which to run programs.

As my career progressed, I migrated through WANG-VS "mini" computers, Burroughs/Unisys mainframes, Solaris Unix, and RedHat/Centos. Back in the day, I wrote General Ledger systems, Order Entry Systems, Billing Systems, etc. Things that one would just buy off-the-shelf today. These days, I work on web-based applications. I have learned how to install and configure those programs I need. To me, web servers and email MTAs are just programs, and my "expertise" is in how to use them, not in the system on which it runs.
 
Old 02-25-2020, 02:27 PM   #21
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 8,537
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826Reputation: 3826
Quote:
Originally Posted by andigena View Post
So many people here are old timers - I feel embarrassed at my relative lack of experience!
Instead you should be happy that you're not aged.
Quote:
Originally Posted by andigena View Post
I've only been using Linux for... five years, I think?
Whoops! Signs of aging!

But seriously, for me you'd call it "organic" just because it was part of my work life, way back when. And I've been in that same line of work for over 30 years. So I picked stuff up naturally, and that grows as you find problems you want to solve and figure those out too. In fact, I think that's what LQ is supposed to be all about.

But as far as feeling out of sorts WRT experience, my general assumption here is that there is like "a" topic where it is very much a done deal in your mind, because you've done it so long and so much, even if that is something like riding a bike or using your phone. It's all in perspective.
 
Old 02-28-2020, 01:43 PM   #22
Minux1
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2020
Posts: 29

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtel57 View Post
> I feel embarrassed at my relative lack of experience!

Don't be. We were ALL there at one time. Even Linus had to learn Linux.
Learn at your own pace ... there's no exam in the morning.
If you screw up then re-install and start again.
My first Arch Linux experience was a disaster but I'm the type that jumps into the deep end of the pool whether I see a shark fin or not.
Predictably it was a re-install waiting to happen.
 
Old 02-28-2020, 01:52 PM   #23
andigena
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2019
Location: Western USA
Distribution: Debian, Slackware
Posts: 122

Rep: Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minux1 View Post
Learn at your own pace ... there's no exam in the morning.
If you screw up then re-install and start again.
My first Arch Linux experience was a disaster but I'm the type that jumps into the deep end of the pool whether I see a shark fin or not.
Predictably it was a re-install waiting to happen.
Boy, I got very well acquainted with that process when I was a total newbie. I seem to have gotten past that stage nowadays because I'm now using two of the most stable distros, and I'm less likely to make dumb mistakes because of my increased level of knowledge.
 
Old 02-28-2020, 02:07 PM   #24
sevendogsbsd
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,531

Rep: Reputation: 624Reputation: 624Reputation: 624Reputation: 624Reputation: 624Reputation: 624
When I learned about Linux, virtualization did not exist. As I was on dial-up at the time, I did what everyone else did and bought a book with a Linux CD in it . I absolutely hated windows back then as well so just installed Linux on my computer and used it. No better teacher than experience. That was 1998 and I have been using it ever since. There was a time where I dual booted using removable drives, then dual booted from different drives permanently installed, but since windows 10 came out, have given up entirely and only boot Linux.

I have run source based distros, binary distros, BSDs, all installed on bare metal, all a learning experience. VMs make it much easier these days but don't tell you whether a given Linux variant will work on your hardware; they only allow you to get used to the UI or the package management system, or the service management system.
 
Old 02-28-2020, 02:37 PM   #25
andigena
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2019
Location: Western USA
Distribution: Debian, Slackware
Posts: 122

Rep: Reputation: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevendogsbsd View Post
When I learned about Linux, virtualization did not exist. As I was on dial-up at the time, I did what everyone else did and bought a book with a Linux CD in it . I absolutely hated windows back then as well so just installed Linux on my computer and used it. No better teacher than experience. That was 1998 and I have been using it ever since. There was a time where I dual booted using removable drives, then dual booted from different drives permanently installed, but since windows 10 came out, have given up entirely and only boot Linux.

I have run source based distros, binary distros, BSDs, all installed on bare metal, all a learning experience. VMs make it much easier these days but don't tell you whether a given Linux variant will work on your hardware; they only allow you to get used to the UI or the package management system, or the service management system.
Yeah, I tried out Slackware in a VM on my Debian system before deciding to install it and it was a vastly different experience between the VM and bare metal. I agree that it's not exactly representative. Plus, you often don't have to exercise as much caution with them on a VM, so one can be more reckless there.
 
Old 02-28-2020, 04:53 PM   #26
vtel57
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: VPN Tunnel, USA
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2
Posts: 1,357

Rep: Reputation: 338Reputation: 338Reputation: 338Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minux1 View Post
If you screw up then re-install and start again.

My first Arch Linux experience was a disaster...
HAHAHA! Yes, indeed. I remember those sleepless all-nighters wiping and reinstalling Linuxes on my machine.

My first really "scary" experience was when I got up enough courage to install PURE Debian. Previously, my only install experience was Ubuntu 6.06 Dapper Drake.

Debian 3.15 "Sarge" booted up and the installer SCARED THE HELL out of me. Heh! I did manage to get through it, though. Ran Debian on my machines for many years as a secondary OS; Arch also, actually.

Nowadays, nothing but Slack on the box. I wasn't enamored with systemd, but that's a whole 'nother thread/debate/discussion.
 
Old 02-28-2020, 04:59 PM   #27
vtel57
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: VPN Tunnel, USA
Distribution: Slackware64 14.2
Posts: 1,357

Rep: Reputation: 338Reputation: 338Reputation: 338Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevendogsbsd View Post
When I learned about Linux, virtualization did not exist.
Same here. I have never yet done anything "virtual" when it comes to Linux. I always install "on the rails" (actual physical installation on hardware) on my machines. I was multi-booting 18 distributions at one time back in the day. It was primarily for the learning experience... and THAT IT WAS!

Fun times! These days, I'm old and happy when the thing comes on and just works.
 
Old 02-29-2020, 12:26 AM   #28
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys for decades while testing others to keep up
Posts: 2,662

Rep: Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785Reputation: 2785
Regarding ReInstalling -

I've already posted how Old Skool, and possibly slightly Luddite, that I am, but I'd like to add that aside from books on Linux initially, why they were so important came about when I stopped the Windows practice or reinstall/reboot to fix every little thing... even major things. Once I learned what, even from just a maintenance shell (runlevel 1 on Slackware), it took to recover from whatever idiot mistake I'd made, that's when the light bulb flared and I really started to use Linux as my Main, and not reboot to Windows, almost ever again.
 
Old 02-29-2020, 07:37 AM   #29
JWJones
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,311

Rep: Reputation: 606Reputation: 606Reputation: 606Reputation: 606Reputation: 606Reputation: 606
I've been using Linux since 1999, and I'm still learning. Started with Red Hat (I think v.5, before RHEL and Fedora), dabbled in Ubuntu when it first came out, moved to Debian for several years, and then mostly Slackware. I've tried just about everything at least once, used Gentoo for a while, and have now settled on Arch.

You can learn Linux with any distro, but I believe the most value comes from using base distros, by which I mean Debian, Slackware, Gentoo, Arch, CRUX, Red Hat/Fedora/CentOS, openSUSE. LFS if you really want to deep dive.

I've learned everything I know from forums and books. The Gentoo and Arch wikis are especially helpful, and not just for those distros.

Last edited by JWJones; 02-29-2020 at 08:05 AM.
 
Old 02-29-2020, 07:41 AM   #30
hazel
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2016
Location: Harrow, UK
Distribution: LFS, AntiX, Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,197
Blog Entries: 11

Rep: Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372Reputation: 2372
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtel57 View Post
My first really "scary" experience was when I got up enough courage to install PURE Debian.

Debian 3.15 "Sarge" booted up and the installer SCARED THE HELL out of me.
Yes, the installer that came with Sarge was definitely for hackers only. In those days the Harrow Computer Club was still a going concern but we were all Windows users. Then we asked someone from the London LUG to come and give us a talk. He left us a Sarge installation CD. Most of us were fairly experienced with computers but we couldn't make head or tail of the questions the installer asked us. For several years afterwards, I thought Debian was an experts-only system. When I did finally pluck up the nerve to try to install it (I think it was Etch) I was amazed at how friendly it had become.

I second what JWJones says about the Arch Wiki.

Last edited by hazel; 02-29-2020 at 07:43 AM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How did you learn Linux? jamescow Linux - General 32 03-19-2009 12:13 AM
LXer: A Microsoft Slur in the OOXML Saga -- Did I Tell You or Did I Tell You? - Updat LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 03-20-2008 01:10 PM
How did you learn Linux? Inlovewithmymac Linux - Newbie 55 01-16-2008 06:33 PM
Why/How did you pick the nickname you did? Gill Bates General 121 12-30-2005 11:41 PM
How long did it take you to learn Linux ? rvijay Linux - General 15 07-22-2004 05:11 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:21 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration