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Old 05-27-2017, 12:12 PM   #16
DavidMcCann
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I think this is one of the great sonnets:
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem...s/detail/44641
Longfellow was not as great as his contemporaries thought him, but anyone who can write like that is a genuine poet.
 
Old 05-27-2017, 12:54 PM   #17
rokytnji
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Going again next year besides doing the Marfa music festival.

http://texascowboypoetry.com/performing/2017/

We have a lot of cultured folks that visit the wild west.


When hard times come they sit a spell,
Like kin folk come to stay
A-packin' troubles, pets an' kids
That always get ‘n your way.
It's drought an' flood, an' flood an' drought,
There ain't much in-between.
You work like hell to make ’em good,
But still they’re sorta lean.

The ranch went under late last year,
The drought got mighty tough.
The boss held-out a long, long time,
But finally said, "enough!"
So here I am dispatchin’ cops
An’ watchin’ felons sleep,
In Junction, at the county jail,
A job I’ll prob’ly keep.

The wife, she works at Leisure Lodge,
Where older people stay,
A-makin’ beds an’ moppin’ floors
To earn some ‘extra’ pay.
Though “extra pay‘s” the term I used,
It goes to payin’ rent,
An’ after all the bills are paid,
We wonder where it went.

We hocked my saddle, guns an' chaps,
An' then our weddin' rings;
Then when we couldn't pay the loan,
They sold the 'dad-blamed' things.
We felt real bad a day or two
But then we let it go,
Cause it got Christmas for the kids
When money got real slow.

When hard times come they sit a spell,
Don't matter who you are;
They'll cost ya things you've set aside,
An' clean your cookie jar.
You'll loose some sleep an' worry some,
Won't pay to moan an' groan;
But hang on to your happiness,
They'll finally leave ya 'lone.

Edit: forgot to include the author: Jim Fish

BBQ, Bikes, and Beer in my one horse town among friends during this Memorial Day Weekend. Semper Fi and Semper Gumbi.

Last edited by rokytnji; 05-27-2017 at 01:02 PM.
 
Old 05-27-2017, 03:12 PM   #18
kudsu
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Text

If

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

If you can make a heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!
 
Old 05-28-2017, 10:25 PM   #19
frankbell
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I must add to my list of favorite poets William Blake. Tyger Tyger Burning Bright is probably his best known work:

Quote:
In the forests of the night;
What immortal hand or eye,
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain,
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp,
Dare its deadly terrors clasp!

When the stars threw down their spears
And water'd heaven with their tears:
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger Tyger burning bright,
In the forests of the night:
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?
(source)
I wrote a paper about him in high school and read lots of his stuff. He had a most unusual cosmology and was one weird, brilliant dude.

And then there is, of course, William Shakespeare. I could not appreciate him until I saw one of his plays performed in a theatre when I was in college. That brought his work to life for me and, ever sense, I can read his plays quite happily. My favorite is The Tempest, because it's light-hearted fun.

Afterthought:

This is a marvelous thread. Only on LQ . . . .

Thanks, OP!

Last edited by frankbell; 05-28-2017 at 10:33 PM.
 
Old 05-29-2017, 07:38 PM   #20
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When Degas met Mallarmé, Degas told him he had these great ideas for poems but never wrote any good poems from them. Mallarmé told him that poems are made with words, not ideas.
 
Old 05-29-2017, 09:55 PM   #21
frankbell
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Quote:
Mallarmé told him that poems are made with words, not ideas.
How true. Just as I could come up with great ideas fpr paintings, but all I can paint is a wall.

A reference in a Nero Wolfe mystery that I am (re)reading reminded me of the works of Robert W. Service. His poems were not great literature, but they were rollicking good fun; many were set against the background of the Yukon gold rush. Here's one:

Quote:
There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.

Now Sam McGee was from Tennessee, where the cotton blooms and blows.
Why he left his home in the South to roam 'round the Pole, God only knows.
He was always cold, but the land of gold seemed to hold him like a spell;
Though he'd often say in his homely way that "he'd sooner live in hell."

On a Christmas Day we were mushing our way over the Dawson trail.
Talk of your cold! through the parka's fold it stabbed like a driven nail.
If our eyes we'd close, then the lashes froze till sometimes we couldn't see;
It wasn't much fun, but the only one to whimper was Sam McGee.

And that very night, as we lay packed tight in our robes beneath the snow,
And the dogs were fed, and the stars o'erhead were dancing heel and toe,
He turned to me, and "Cap," says he, "I'll cash in this trip, I guess;
And if I do, I'm asking that you won't refuse my last request."

Well, he seemed so low that I couldn't say no; then he says with a sort of moan:
"It's the cursèd cold, and it's got right hold till I'm chilled clean through to the bone.
Yet 'tain't being dead—it's my awful dread of the icy grave that pains;
So I want you to swear that, foul or fair, you'll cremate my last remains."

A pal's last need is a thing to heed, so I swore I would not fail;
And we started on at the streak of dawn; but God! he looked ghastly pale.
He crouched on the sleigh, and he raved all day of his home in Tennessee;
And before nightfall a corpse was all that was left of Sam McGee.

There wasn't a breath in that land of death, and I hurried, horror-driven,
With a corpse half hid that I couldn't get rid, because of a promise given;
It was lashed to the sleigh, and it seemed to say: "You may tax your brawn and brains,
But you promised true, and it's up to you to cremate those last remains."

Now a promise made is a debt unpaid, and the trail has its own stern code.
In the days to come, though my lips were dumb, in my heart how I cursed that load.
In the long, long night, by the lone firelight, while the huskies, round in a ring,
Howled out their woes to the homeless snows— O God! how I loathed the thing.

And every day that quiet clay seemed to heavy and heavier grow;
And on I went, though the dogs were spent and the grub was getting low;
The trail was bad, and I felt half mad, but I swore I would not give in;
And I'd often sing to the hateful thing, and it hearkened with a grin.

Till I came to the marge of Lake Lebarge, and a derelict there lay;
It was jammed in the ice, but I saw in a trice it was called the "Alice May."
And I looked at it, and I thought a bit, and I looked at my frozen chum;
Then "Here," said I, with a sudden cry, "is my cre-ma-tor-eum."

Some planks I tore from the cabin floor, and I lit the boiler fire;
Some coal I found that was lying around, and I heaped the fuel higher;
The flames just soared, and the furnace roared—such a blaze you seldom see;
And I burrowed a hole in the glowing coal, and I stuffed in Sam McGee.

Then I made a hike, for I didn't like to hear him sizzle so;
And the heavens scowled, and the huskies howled, and the wind began to blow.
It was icy cold, but the hot sweat rolled down my cheeks, and I don't know why;
And the greasy smoke in an inky cloak went streaking down the sky.

I do not know how long in the snow I wrestled with grisly fear;
But the stars came out and they danced about ere again I ventured near;
I was sick with dread, but I bravely said: "I'll just take a peep inside.
I guess he's cooked, and it's time I looked"; ... then the door I opened wide.

And there sat Sam, looking cool and calm, in the heart of the furnace roar;
And he wore a smile you could see a mile, and he said: "Please close that door.
It's fine in here, but I greatly fear you'll let in the cold and storm—
Since I left Plumtree, down in Tennessee, it's the first time I've been warm."

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.
(source)
 
Old 05-30-2017, 10:54 AM   #22
Soadyheid
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In a world where people fight and distrust each other, rich or poor, irrespective of colour creed or religion...

we're all the same.

Quote:
A Man's a Man for a' That
Poem

Is there for honest Poverty
That hings his head, an' a' that;
The coward slave - we pass him by,
We dare be poor for a' that!
For a' that, an' a' that.
Our toils obscure an' a' that,
The rank is but the guinea's stamp,
The Man's the gowd for a' that.

What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an' a that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
A Man's a Man for a' that:
For a' that, and a' that,
Their tinsel show, an' a' that;
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that.

Ye see yon birkie ca'd a lord,
Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that,
Tho' hundreds worship at his word,
He's but a coof for a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
His ribband, star, an' a' that,
The man o' independent mind,
He looks an' laughs at a' that.

A Prince can mak a belted knight,
A marquis, duke, an' a' that!
But an honest man's aboon his might –
Guid faith, he mauna fa' that!
For a' that, an' a' that,
Their dignities, an' a' that,
The pith o' Sense an' pride o' Worth
Are higher rank than a' that.

Then let us pray that come it may,
As come it will for a' that,
That Sense and Worth, o'er a' the earth
Shall bear the gree an' a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
It's comin yet for a' that,
That Man to Man the warld o'er
Shall brithers be for a' that.

Robert Burns
Burn's poems are also fantastic when sung.

Play Bonny!

 
Old 05-31-2017, 03:08 PM   #23
enorbet
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Ah yes, no "wee timorous beastie" was ol' Bobby Boy.
 
Old 06-05-2017, 08:08 AM   #24
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Wow there's some great stuff here. Thanks to frankbell for reminding me of the Cremation, and to those who've mentioned Kipling's if already.

Here are two of my favourites:

Good Timber by Douglas Malloch

And on a lighter note, somewhere below all that good timber...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Hart

Little earthworm in the ground,
You see no sight, you hear no sound.
You gnaw out tunnels down beneath
without the benefit of teeth.
Without no feet, no arm, no hand,
We are behooved to understand
Just how, with attributes so few,
They named a planet after you.
 
Old 06-05-2017, 03:14 PM   #25
MensaWater
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Johnny Hart - I've loved his humor since BC...

Last edited by MensaWater; 06-05-2017 at 03:16 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2017, 05:54 AM   #26
Pall Parker
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Thumbs up

Hello! My name is Pall. I am a writer, that's why I really love poetry. This means that I can provide academic help to students.
opportunity. By the way is A pretty a day by E. E. Cummings
A pretty a day
(and every fades)
is here and away
(but born are maids
to flower an hour
in all,all)
o yes to flower
until so blithe
a doer a wooer
some limber and lithe
some very fine mower
a tall;tall
some jerry so very
(and nellie and fan)
some handsomest harry
(and sally and nan
they tremble and cower
so paleale)
for betty was born
to never say nay
but lucy could learn
and lily could pray
and fewer were shyer
than doll. doll

Last edited by Pall Parker; 06-16-2017 at 10:12 AM.
 
Old 06-06-2017, 07:16 AM   #27
kudsu
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Cool Through a 1960s drugged vision

“To be nobody but
yourself in a world
which is doing its best day and night to make you like
everybody else means to fight the hardest battle
which any human being can fight and never stop fighting.”

― E.E. Cummings

I would change the poem to read never ever ever. Apparently more than Huxley, Bradbury or Orwell he might have been shall we say nicely have been discontent.

This next one is for my civics professor Mr. Rosa. Everybody back then knew the side they were on for the Vietnam war. I think most of them knew why. I fear today they don't even know why.

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Edmund Burke
Read more at: https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/q...urk377528.html
 
Old 06-06-2017, 05:45 PM   #28
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This one's pretty dark, but there's something I like about it - especially since Emerald Rose sung an excellent version of it.

Rudyard Kipling - A Pict Song
 
Old 06-06-2017, 08:20 PM   #29
frankbell
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e. e. cummings is also one of my favorites. When you take away the freaky (lack of) capitalization and formatting and syntax, he was a lyric poet. This is probably his best known:

Quote:
anyone lived in a pretty how town
(with up so floating many bells down)
spring summer autumn winter
he sang his didn’t he danced his did.

Women and men(both little and small)
cared for anyone not at all
they sowed their isn’t they reaped their same
sun moon stars rain

children guessed(but only a few
and down they forgot as up they grew
autumn winter spring summer)
that noone loved him more by more

when by now and tree by leaf
she laughed his joy she cried his grief
bird by snow and stir by still
anyone’s any was all to her

someones married their everyones
laughed their cryings and did their dance
(sleep wake hope and then)they
said their nevers they slept their dream

stars rain sun moon
(and only the snow can begin to explain
how children are apt to forget to remember
with up so floating many bells down)

one day anyone died i guess
(and noone stooped to kiss his face)
busy folk buried them side by side
little by little and was by was

all by all and deep by deep
and more by more they dream their sleep
noone and anyone earth by april
wish by spirit and if by yes.

Women and men(both dong and ding)
summer autumn winter spring
reaped their sowing and went their came
sun moon stars rain.
(source)
 
Old 06-07-2017, 08:49 AM   #30
kudsu
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Wink Real Good For Free

Joni Mitchell wrote and sung the song real good for free. I love the message of this song. It is on the surface about a clarinet player plays great on the street for phone change. She describes him as real good for free. This video is on Youtube. To me this song means have some conviction, don't do things for just money, try to develop to know and predict the truth, and have a conscience and be yourself.
 
  


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