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////// 04-09-2021 09:44 AM

well my gfx card has hdmi connector and one of my monitors has vga connector, i just ordered hdmi to vga adapter.
Code:

Here in the UK, you sell it to Computer Exchange. Don't they have anything like that in Finland?
what kind of shop is that?

hazel 04-09-2021 10:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ////// (Post 6239029)
well my gfx card has hdmi connector and one of my monitors has vga connector, i just ordered hdmi to vga adapter.
Code:

Here in the UK, you sell it to Computer Exchange. Don't they have anything like that in Finland?
what kind of shop is that?

It's a chain of shops that buy and sell second-hand electronics and games. I bought both my main computer and my laptop off them. Although the stuff is old, they refurbish it and sell it with the usual guarantees.

////// 04-09-2021 10:22 AM

i am sure there is shops like that in here. i know that there is shop(s) that sell used office computers, like when some company buys new computers those shops buy the old ones and resell em.

i just use/buy computers and parts from https://www.jimms.fi/ its a biggest computer shop here in finland.
and they have good customer service, like when i build my old computer i forgot to order cpu cooler they gave it to me free of charge.

cwizardone 04-09-2021 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hazel (Post 6238863)
..............Actually I hate buying stuff online because I don't feel safe doing it. I don't want my card details stored on servers all over the internet, where they can be skimmed by spyware and sold to crooks. Also I don't know how you tell a genuine site from one that just takes your money and doesn't provide the goods, and I won't buy from Amazon on principle. But a recommended site is a different matter........

Overall, I agree, but sometimes there isn't much choice these days. I share a Amazon Prime account with a relative. Prime accounts get free shipping, so that saves some money right there. What I've found is IF the item is sold and shipped by Amazon, I haven't had a problem. IF it is one of their third party "vendors" than you may have a problem. I put vendors is quotes as some of them are little more than thieves. I've been ripped off several times and swear I'll never buy another item via Amazon. OTOH, Amazon always steps up and will pay to return the item and credit the account. Sometimes it is more trouble than it is worth.
One positive thing is the variety of items you can find through Amazon. When a grandchild was born a few months ago I found, on Amazon, an outfit that will imprint the child's name and date of birth on the appropriately colored blanket. Couldn't find that around here if I walked every street in the greater metropolitan area. The outfit was on the other side of the country. I ordered in the morning and by that afternoon the blanket had been imprinted and shipped. One of the positive experiences among several negative experiences.
One of the local banks offers free accounts to "seasoned citizens" so I maintain a small account there and use it for online purchases. There is never enough in the account that if it was stolen I would be in financial trouble. :)

Emerson 04-09-2021 10:59 AM

At least one of my credit card issuers offers one-time-credit-card, I can go to their website and create myself a credit card which can be used only once. Good to tease those online services which demand you to sign up with promise you can cancel it any time and then you can go nuts trying to cancel it.

cwizardone 04-09-2021 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Emerson (Post 6239085)
At least one of my credit card issuers offers one-time-credit-card, I can go to their website and create myself a credit card which can be used only once. Good to tease those online services which demand you to sign up with promise you can cancel it any time and then you can go nuts trying to cancel it.

Many thanks.
Great idea.
I'll look into it.
:hattip:

Emerson 04-09-2021 11:16 AM

There is more, it pays off to learn what you get. I have another credit card which extends all warranties by one year, say, I buy a washing machine or any appliance or gadget using this card and they will add one year to its warranty if I use their card. People never read those contracts what they sign ...

DavidMcCann 04-09-2021 11:24 AM

I have a Barclaycard — I first got one when they were the only bank card in the UK! — which is set to a low credit limit and only used for online purchases. It was compromised once, about 20 years ago, but the first attempt to use it was blocked as over my limit.

rnturn 04-09-2021 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hazel (Post 6238492)
I know that cathode ray tubes wear out but I always thought that flat screens don't because they don't get hot.

I've had very good luck with flat screens... except once. My old 24in LG widescreen monitor was working perfectly until the power switch failed. One day it was fine and the next morning I had trouble getting it to light up. The day after that it failed completely---the on/off switch had failed hard. Sadly, LG's case had no visible screws to allow someone to open it (shades of the old "No User Serviceable Parts Inside!" warning). They glued the case together so well that I gave up any thought of trying to replace the microswitch that had failed. If it had been a CRT whose power switch had failed, I could have opened the thing up and worked on it. Old technology: you can work on it. New technology: throw it away when it breaks. :^(

hazel 04-10-2021 04:16 AM

Mine doesn't have screws either; I just checked.

Emerson 04-10-2021 05:10 AM

:) :) :)

I have seen many, they all come apart, once the bezel is off you can see the screws.

hazel 06-17-2021 05:46 AM

It finally gave up the ghost. RIP. For weeks, I just didn't turn it off at night; I let the computer switch itself off but left the main switch on to keep the monitor running. And it worked just fine. But yesterday the forecast said there would be violent thunderstorms overnight and I know that can sometimes cause surges in the power supply. I didn't want the computer or its external power unit to run any risk of being damaged, so I switched off at the main for the first time in two months. Now the monitor doesn't work any more.

I'm using a spare 17" screen for the time being. Now that the shops are open again, I can go and buy a new 19" one.

enorbet 06-17-2021 06:09 AM

That it displayed it's internal setup menu when disconnected from your PC likely indicates that absent some internal intermittent connection the odds are ports and cables, the interface. Repairing modern digital components is generally folly. The very practices that make devices smaller and cheaper to mass produce (PCBs and wave soldered surface mount components) are anathema to hands-on repair. The easiest and cheapest repair beyond cleaning and connector integrity (bent pins, weakened "springy" connectors) is to replace the cable. These days some companies, and Dell was an early adopter, no longer concern themselves much with universal compatibility on any components that aren't spec locked down (like power supply connections for newer applications like PCie, CPU, and Graphics) but interface from PC to Monitors are all locked down so it is impossible to get a cable that won't comply. This is especially true in your case, hazel, since you're gear uses the old D-shell VGA connector. Brand new decent quality VGA cables are under 10 bucks USD

hazel 06-17-2021 06:13 AM

Oh, I've got the cables! No problem, I even have a spare. I just need a decent sized screen.

enorbet 06-17-2021 06:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hazel (Post 6259828)
I just need a decent sized screen.


Being an ancient diabetic, I relate wholeheartedly! I no longer have any screens smaller than 27 inches.


BTW since keyboard and monitor (for some, mouse, too) are how we interface it is arguably a given that these are the most important PC components we own. Even if it requires saving up for a year it seems wise to consider the rather long term investment in one's eyes to get a monitor that's easy on vision. One can get even a 23 inch monitor these days for around $100 that should last 10 years. At $10/year that's a wise investment for aging eyes, especially for those of us who spend hours each day squinting at them :)

Being an Old School electronics guy I hate the concept of "Replace, Don't Repair" but I have to admit it is astounding how far down most technology prices have come. In 2002 my Mother bought an early cheapest-offbrand-available HD TV. It was 24 inches and cost over $700. 19 years later one can buy a 45 inch Sony for the same money and the difference is WAY more than just size..


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