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Old 05-24-2005, 01:26 AM   #16
vharishankar
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Cinematography,

Good that you found some resources to help you. I have used Apt-get and Synaptic for a while now and I believe the true power of The Debian Way is that it comes with many checks and balances to prevent your system from getting screwed up by certain risky installations.

There is a package called apt-listbugs which when installed will help you prevent installing buggy packages before-hand. When I did a system upgrade yesterday, I was warned that certain packages were buggy and hence advised against upgrading. I believe that is the biggest strong point of Debian over RPM (which is not so safe as is made out to be). This is why Debian is considered to be a stable, powerful distro.

I think that if you learn a few tips and tricks of the apt system, you would be surprised at the power it gives you. I have myself found this out after switching from Fedora.

Best of luck with Linux.
 
Old 05-24-2005, 01:34 AM   #17
Cinematography
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Thank you for your reply Harishankar, and everyone else. I guess I was wrong about .deb. Sorry about exploding. I need more sleep and meds, I suppose.
 
Old 05-24-2005, 01:39 AM   #18
craigevil
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What is a Debian package?

Packages generally contain all of the files necessary to implement a set of related commands or features. There are two types of Debian packages:

* Binary packages, which contain executables, configuration files, man/info pages, copyright information, and other documentation. These packages are distributed in a Debian-specific archive format; they are usually distinguished by having a '.deb' file extension. Binary packages can be unpacked using the Debian utility dpkg; details are given in its manual page.

* Source packages, which consist of a .dsc file describing the source package (including the names of the following files), a .orig.tar.gz file that contains the original unmodified source in gzip-compressed tar format and usually a .diff.gz file that contains the Debian-specific changes to the original source. The utility dpkg-source packs and unpacks Debian source archives; details are provided in its manual page.

Installation of software by the package system uses "dependencies" which are carefully designed by the package maintainers. These dependencies are documented in the control file associated with each package.

The good points about Debian Package handling:
* Installing a package doesn't require manual downloading.
* Installing a package automatically installs its dependencies.
* Single-command upgrading.
* Upgrading won't clobber config files without prompting.
* Purge (completely remove a package) vs Remove (don't delete config files).

Package Management Tools

dpkg- This is the main package management program. dpkg can be invoked with many options.

dselect - This program is a menu-driven interface to the Debian package management system. It is particularly useful for first-time installations and large-scale upgrades.

"APT HOWTO" Command Line package management HOWTO.
"Advanced Packaging Tool, or APT" apt-get provides a simple way to install packages from the command line. Unlike dpkg, apt-get does not understand .deb files, it works with the packages proper name and can only install .deb archives from a source specified in /etc/apt/sources.list.

apt-listbugs is a tool which retrieves bug reports from the Debian Bug Tracking System and lists them. Especially, it is intended to be invoked before each upgrade/installation by apt in order to check whether the upgrade/installation is safe. apt-listbugs lists critical bug reports from the Debian Bug Tracking System. Run it before apt to see if an upgrade or installation is known to be unsafe.

Synaptic is a graphical package management program for apt.
It provides the same features as the apt-get command line utility with a GUI front-end based on Gtk+.
* Install, remove, upgrade and downgrade single and multiple packages.
* Upgrade your whole system.
* Manage package repositories (sources.list).
* Find packages by name, description and several other attributes.
* Select packages by status, section, name or a custom filter.
* Sort packages by name, status, size or version.
* Browse all available online documentation related to a package.
* Download the latest changelog of a package.
* Lock packages to the current version.
* Force the installation of a specifc package version.
* Undo/Redo of selections.
* Built-in terminal emulator for the package manager.
* Debian only: Configure packages through the debconf system.

Gnome Package Manager GDPM
GDPM is a GNOME-based graphical manager for Debian packages. It aims to fully replace the command-line tools apt-get, apt-cache, and dpkg by offering an easy way to install, remove, upgrade, and browse Debian packages.

KDE Package Manager Kpackage
Kpackage is the KDE-based graphical frontend to both .rpm and .deb package formats. It allows you to view currently installed packages, browse available packages, and install/remove them.

Alien converts between the rpm, deb, Stampede slp, and Slackware tgz file formats. If you want to use a package from another distribution than the one you have installed on your system, you can use alien to convert it to your preferred package format and install it.

Aptitude is a text-based interface to the Debian GNU/Linux package system. "It displays a list of software packages and allows the user to interactively pick packages to install or remove. Aptitude is based on the ncurses computer terminal library, with which it provides an interface that incorporates some elements commonly seen in graphical user interfaces (GUIs) (such as pull-down menus). It remembers which packages you deliberately installed and which packages were pulled in through dependencies; the latter packages are automatically de-installed by aptitude when they are no longer needed by any deliberately installed packages. It has advanced package-filtering features but these can be difficult to configure.

If you do not see a package that you want try searching apt-get.org. Once you find the package you are looking for just add the repository to your source list at /etc/apt/sources.list. Run apt-update or reload Synaptic and your all set.

It is also a good idea to READ all of the documentation available for your distro.
"An important part of any operating system is documentation, the technical manuals that describe the operation and use of programs. As part of its efforts to create a high-quality free operating system, the Debian Project is making every effort to provide all of its users with proper documentation in an easily accessible form."

Last edited by craigevil; 05-24-2005 at 09:12 AM.
 
Old 05-24-2005, 01:44 AM   #19
alred
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Quote:
Sorry about exploding. I need more sleep and meds, I suppose.
shh .....silence please ....

Zzz.. zZ.... z.... ZZ... zzzzZz .. z .................


shh ..... only sligthly audible ...shh ... i think linux is too hard for anybody afterall ......shh ........


chorus :
Zzz.. zZ.... z.... ZZ... zzzzZz .. z .................
 
Old 05-24-2005, 01:44 AM   #20
Cinematography
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Craigevil, you are my hero! Thank you so so so so so so so much! I feel like such an ass now. Maybe .deb ain't that bad.
 
Old 05-24-2005, 01:46 AM   #21
Cinematography
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lol@alred
 
Old 05-24-2005, 01:54 AM   #22
craigevil
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cinematography
Craigevil, you are my hero! Thank you so so so so so so so much! I feel like such an ass now. Maybe .deb ain't that bad.
It is all a matter of knowing how to search and where to look for the answers. I have only been using Linux since November, I find that it is actually easier than windows once you know where to find answers to your problems.

Stick with it you will find that it is not that diffcult at all.
 
Old 05-24-2005, 01:56 AM   #23
alred
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some true hacker "just whack" spirit , my friend .......

???? --purge --force-depends ???? , ????? dpkg-reconfigure ?????, -i --force- ?????
"direct" copy whole directories from working linux(any distros) partition
"direct" copy libraries from working linux(any distros) partition(change the version number but don't be ridiculous like jumping from 0.01 to 10.0.1)
have some FEELINGS of it then you will get better ......
and you will be a "functional" GURU but still a GURU
 
Old 05-24-2005, 02:00 AM   #24
reddazz
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ironi
http://www.ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=36618

Don't feed the crossposting troll, folks.
I don't think there is anything wrong in posting on different websites. I do that quite often with FreeBSD or Fedora/Redhat issues and I know quite a few other members here who do the same.
 
Old 05-24-2005, 02:03 AM   #25
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by craigevil
It is all a matter of knowing how to search and where to look for the answers. I have only been using Linux since November, I find that it is actually easier than windows once you know where to find answers to your problems.

Stick with it you will find that it is not that diffcult at all.
You're very encouraging. Thank you again, Craig.
 
Old 05-24-2005, 03:24 AM   #26
craigevil
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Try running apt-get moo in a terminal/console for a good laugh.




Last edited by craigevil; 05-24-2005 at 09:14 AM.
 
Old 05-24-2005, 04:37 AM   #27
vharishankar
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Quote:
Try running apt-get moo in a terminal/console for a good laugh.
Nice artwork!
 
Old 05-24-2005, 03:58 PM   #28
craigevil
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Another good place to look at how Debian Package Management works - DebianWiki
http://wiki.debian.net/?DebianPackageManagement

"wajig (2.0.25)
simplified Debian package management front end"
http://packages.debian.org/testing/admin/wajig.html

"CheckInstall keeps track of all files installed by a "make install" or equivalent, creates a Slackware, RPM, or Debian package with those files, and adds it to the installed packages database, allowing for easy package removal or distribution"
http://freshmeat.net/projects/checkinstall/

Last edited by craigevil; 05-24-2005 at 04:02 PM.
 
Old 05-25-2005, 06:19 AM   #29
londonboi
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Re: .deb is NOT easier than .rpm

Quote:
Originally posted by Cinematography
I can't believe I believed the hype. I went through the hell of switching from Mandrake to Ubuntu just because people told me debian based distros were easier for installing programs. They are NOT! It seems like I have to use the 1980s terminal technique more than ever! At least with .rpm files I could just click them and they would go. I'm so pissed off and tired right now. I'm really getting sick of this. I can't use Windows because it draws in viruses and spyware. I can't use Linux because it makes simple tasks insanely difficult. And I can't use Mac because I don't have the money. Uggg... Oh, and gnome is terrible. If you have to use the terminal for everything, it could at least make files easier to access like KDE does and load up from any directory. I hear everyone talking about 'simplicity'. Simplicity is only good for IT professionals and advanced users! The GUI was invented for a reason. Until the Linux community finds a way to bring users more automation (one click install, icons that make themselves, etc), it will never become as popular as Windows - hence, it will not get the kind of software support it wants.
If you want one click installs and dont mind paying for the simplicity try Linsipre www.linspire.com
 
Old 06-23-2005, 07:20 PM   #30
ptesone
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ubuntuguide.org

This is how I got my java to work in ubuntu
and my mplayer
and my xine
and menu editor
and browsing as root
and extra repositories
and anything else I could ever wonder about. . .
and after figuring out how to get around gnome (as well as I could in KDE) I found it wasn't so bad after all. . .

What's funny about Ubuntuguide is it looks as tho they're trying to make the same programs available as say Mepis 3.3. . .
And now that I'm trying out PCOnlineOS 9 (which is an RPM based package system) I can honestly say, they're just not much difference between the three. . .They all come with pretty much the same programs, aside from ubuntu which is where this guide comes in very handy

I haven't had any trouble using any of the Linux OS's, except maybe gentoo (that's cos I'm an impatient OS junkie)
 
  


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