LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices


View Poll Results: Given the choice...
Yes, always 3 18.75%
No, would much prefer something else 6 37.50%
Depends how/where it's made 7 43.75%
Voters: 16. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-22-2019, 04:38 AM   #31
Lysander666
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2017
Location: The Underearth
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 2,032

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205

Quote:
Originally Posted by vmccord View Post
I remember one Christmas dinner with my ex and his parents where I made venison and spaetzle and Zwiebelkuchen and neither of them ate any of it and instead had frozen hashbrown and cheese casserole.
How ungrateful, I would have loved to have tried that, I really enjoy trying new foods from different countries. This is rather a hit-and-miss experiment though, since there are some things that I love and some things which I hate, but I'll give anything a go once.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
Aghh what an annoying article... not your fault though jefro, your question is valid. But who cares if it's "Kate Middleton's favourite pudding"? Manipulative gold-digging bint. Anyway, that aside, no, that's a sticky toffee pudding, which, when done correctly, can be epic [I'm not saying that Felicity knows how to make a good one necessarily, but the picture looks decent].

A Christmas pudding looks like this and is often doused with cognac and set alight before serving. It's customary to hide coins in it for good luck, but I'm sure health and safety regulations have forbidden quite a few restaurants from serving it like that these days.

Last edited by Lysander666; 11-22-2019 at 04:46 AM.
 
Old 11-22-2019, 05:04 AM   #32
hazel
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2016
Location: Harrow, UK
Distribution: LFS, AntiX, Slackware
Posts: 3,696
Blog Entries: 10

Rep: Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031Reputation: 2031
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
Christmas trees, though, I think have a German origin.
There's a popular legend in the UK that Prince Albert set up the first Christmas tree in England. Certainly he and Victoria always had one.
 
Old 11-22-2019, 05:07 AM   #33
Lysander666
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2017
Location: The Underearth
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 2,032

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205Reputation: 2205
On Xmas tree origins, this is from the article I posted earlier [OK, I could write out something similar here but I would just be saying the same thing, so I may as well just quote it]:

Quote:
The Christmas tree itself is a mixture of both pagan and later German traditions. In the Winter with all the countryside going into a period of slumber or death, the fir tree was seen to live on so it became a symbol of life. Firs were brought into people’s homes in the hope that some of their fortune would rub off on them. Decorating the tree was a much later practice and most possibly stemmed from Germany, coming from 16th century “Paradeisbaum” trees being brought into homes to celebrate the Christian festival of Adam and Eve on the 24th December. This tradition was then brought to America by German immigrants, eventually being popularised en masse by the mid 19th century.

Last edited by Lysander666; 11-22-2019 at 05:11 AM.
 
Old 11-22-2019, 04:12 PM   #34
Dennis2
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2018
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by fido_dogstoyevsky View Post
I'm sorry, but in my experience that's an oxymoron. We semiregularly have to prepare a second for Christmas because the original gets disappeared via quality control.
It depends how many you make the first time.

Dennis
 
Old 11-22-2019, 04:47 PM   #35
fido_dogstoyevsky
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2015
Location: Victoria, Australia
Distribution: Slackware 14.2
Posts: 342
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 420Reputation: 420Reputation: 420Reputation: 420Reputation: 420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis2 View Post
It depends how many you make the first time.

Dennis
"Well, we shouldn't really be having too much sugar, so we'll just make the one..." - which is a _really_ good intention.
 
Old 11-23-2019, 06:24 AM   #36
ondoho
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2013
Posts: 12,894
Blog Entries: 9

Rep: Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518Reputation: 3518
I had an English christmas pudding exactly once, I think.
It was store-bought, so probably not very good. I still remember the taste - something I don't have any difficulty eating (sweet, slightly bitter), but would never look forward to.

Speaking of traditional christmas food in general, that's an interesting topic!
My chosen home Finland is particularly strange... in the old days, the hardest time of the year for really poor farmers, it's mostly mashed root vegetables, baked slowly in low heat. At least that's the part I like the most (and is the most traditional I daresay). The slow baking brings out a lot of taste & sweetness.

There's similarly baked ham which, done right, is almost perfectly gray and melting on the tongue.
But in the old days, that was only for the rich...

Very probably also fish.

Dessert is rice cooked in milk, topped with cinnamon & sugar.

One thing I noticed when I was invited to an actual Finnish christmas once is that almost all food was of the kind that you prepare once, and then eat for many days.
I guess nobody was ever in the habit of spending most of christmas in the kitchen...

Last edited by ondoho; 11-23-2019 at 06:26 AM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When Groff, Bison and GDB are so critical, that they must be updated... even on Christmas. And, Merry Christmas, Slackware Team! ZhaoLin1457 Slackware 2 12-25-2018 06:10 AM
LXer: Sticky Tahr-fy pudding: Ubuntu 14.04 is slickest Linux desktop ever LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 03-28-2014 08:10 PM
LXer: The Great Jitters: Pudding Panic Ă¢?? Review| Friday Game LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 04-14-2012 09:43 PM
LXer: A new Linux Game â?? The Great Jitters Pudding Panic LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 04-14-2012 08:50 PM
Merry Christmas lynch General 9 12-26-2003 04:36 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:11 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration