LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Latest LQ Deals
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-14-2021, 01:20 PM   #16
rnturn
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2003
Location: Illinois (SW Chicago 'burbs)
Distribution: openSUSE, Raspbian, Slackware. Older: Coherent, MacOS, Red Hat, Big Iron IXs: AIX, Solaris, Tru64
Posts: 2,668

Rep: Reputation: 529Reputation: 529Reputation: 529Reputation: 529Reputation: 529Reputation: 529

Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
I remember my first calculator back in the 1970s, a big HP with clicky buttons and a battery charger, that replaced my logarithm tables. I did have a slide rule but I never really got to grips with that.
Yeah. I had an TI SR-10 that was much faster than a slide rule. I always brought the slide rule to an exam in case the TI battery conked out during the test. It did a couple of times and I discovered how quickly one's slide rule skills can get rusty.
 
Old 07-16-2021, 05:28 PM   #17
floppy_stuttgart
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: EU mainland
Distribution: Debian like
Posts: 1,065
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 106Reputation: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
I remember my first calculator back in the 1970s, a big HP with clicky buttons and a battery charger, that replaced my logarithm tables. I did have a slide rule but I never really got to grips with that.
oh. HP in the 70? you had already big money in the family ;-)
That was NOT easy for me to get an HP41CV in 1983. That was expensive. But unbelievable good fun.
 
Old 07-17-2021, 06:47 AM   #18
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 9,715
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770Reputation: 4770
Quote:
Originally Posted by floppy_stuttgart View Post
oh. HP in the 70? you had already big money in the family ;-)
That was NOT easy for me to get an HP41CV in 1983. That was expensive. But unbelievable good fun.
I never liked that stupid rippin' logic (RPN). Oddly I found an HP with AOS and got it because for years friends told me the key quality was unprecedented. Tis true, how many buttons would break on a TI calculator. I still have the HP my daughter used it in high school. Never use it these days, either just my phone or a desktop computer, and usually Excel formulas or MATLAB.
 
Old 07-18-2021, 05:52 AM   #19
floppy_stuttgart
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: EU mainland
Distribution: Debian like
Posts: 1,065
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 106Reputation: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
I never liked that stupid rippin' logic (RPN). Oddly I found an HP with AOS and got it because for years friends told me the key quality was unprecedented. Tis true, how many buttons would break on a TI calculator. I still have the HP my daughter used it in high school. Never use it these days, either just my phone or a desktop computer, and usually Excel formulas or MATLAB.
Stupid RPN?
I have another view: RPN makes thinking in sequencing and stacking before you click the keys. A kind of brain jogging.
However by these days, all sequences are stored in the new expensive calculators. by recalling the sequence and modifying it, error can be corrected.
For me, the best calculator would be
- RPN (and switch possible to the mode arithmetic)
- Stack of 4 (X Y Z T) and adjustable (till 1000) according user wish
- Storage of the last 23 operations (and recall possible)
 
Old 07-18-2021, 06:48 AM   #20
leclerc78
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2020
Posts: 115

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
My whole life I chose the 'loosing' side (RPN, Beta, Linux) and love it.
When my HP35 gave up its soul decades ago because of coffee overdoses, I never buy another expensive one again.
 
Old 07-18-2021, 08:17 AM   #21
business_kid
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware, Slarm64 & Android
Posts: 14,280

Rep: Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950Reputation: 1950
Over here, calcularors went from £200 (we has the IR£ back then) to £2 awful fast …
 
Old 07-27-2021, 06:36 AM   #22
YesItsMe
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2014
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 812

Rep: Reputation: 284Reputation: 284Reputation: 284
I found the HP-15C simulator to be rather good; multi-platform and written in Tcl.
 
Old 03-03-2022, 11:28 AM   #23
EdGr
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2010
Location: California, USA
Distribution: I run my own OS
Posts: 865

Rep: Reputation: 431Reputation: 431Reputation: 431Reputation: 431Reputation: 431
Bump!

I recently bought a Casio FX-9750GIII (U.S. version of the FX-9860GIII). This is a modestly-priced graphing, programmable calculator.

I am impressed. The calculator does everything: complex numbers, matrix operations, integrals, and derivatives. It has a vastly superior UI compared to old-style calculators. Formulas are entered and displayed as written. Previous calculations are editable. The last feature alone makes buying a new calculator worthwhile.

If you haven't touched a calculator in decades, it may be worth a look.
Ed

Last edited by EdGr; 03-03-2022 at 11:50 AM.
 
Old 03-04-2022, 10:40 AM   #24
DavidMcCann
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: PCLinuxOS, Debian
Posts: 5,966

Rep: Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222
The Cassios seem pretty durable, too. I bought mine in 1996 and it got a new battery in 2020.
 
Old 03-04-2022, 11:22 AM   #25
EdGr
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2010
Location: California, USA
Distribution: I run my own OS
Posts: 865

Rep: Reputation: 431Reputation: 431Reputation: 431Reputation: 431Reputation: 431
That is impressive. The graphing calculators consume too much power for button cells, but the Casio still takes standard AAA batteries. I will buy a set of AAA NIMH rechargeables.
Ed
 
Old 03-05-2022, 10:40 AM   #26
DavidMcCann
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: London
Distribution: PCLinuxOS, Debian
Posts: 5,966

Rep: Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222Reputation: 2222
Ah, mine isn't a graphing one, so it has the round battery and photo-electric cell. 24 years for AAA would be impressive!
 
Old 03-19-2022, 03:02 AM   #27
openbsd98324
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2022
Posts: 46

Rep: Reputation: 4
The best is likely the ti-92 and the x48. the x48 (hp48) is likely the very best. If you have a raspberry pi, with raspios, you can still use : mathematica wolfram (non-free).

If you still use Linux, you can run : apt-get is there.
what about TILEM2, X48, and TIEMU ?

On BSD, it looks like: pkg install x48

Here a screenshot.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1647677207-screenshot.jpg
Views:	9
Size:	231.9 KB
ID:	38626  

Last edited by openbsd98324; 03-19-2022 at 03:08 AM.
 
Old 03-19-2022, 06:22 PM   #28
floppy_stuttgart
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2010
Location: EU mainland
Distribution: Debian like
Posts: 1,065
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 106Reputation: 106
I recommend.
a) a V41 running on a Raspbian (raspberry PI) via wine
b) interaction via a touchscreen (or mouse)
c) it can exchange programs with PCs
= an HP41 anno 1980 RPN scientific calculator
the best of the best (forget the rest)
;-)
 
Old 03-22-2022, 01:53 PM   #29
openbsd98324
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2022
Posts: 46

Rep: Reputation: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by floppy_stuttgart View Post
I recommend.
a) a V41 running on a Raspbian (raspberry PI) via wine
b) interaction via a touchscreen (or mouse)
c) it can exchange programs with PCs
= an HP41 anno 1980 RPN scientific calculator
the best of the best (forget the rest)
;-)
wine? are you kidding? wine is windowzs and opensource software are million time better.

tilem2 is quite ok as a work around.
see https://www.zophar.net/ti.html
http://www.hp41.org/Emulation.cfm

Last edited by openbsd98324; 03-22-2022 at 01:55 PM.
 
Old 03-22-2022, 06:36 PM   #30
jailbait
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Debian 11
Posts: 8,064

Rep: Reputation: 456Reputation: 456Reputation: 456Reputation: 456Reputation: 456
I bought my first calculator about 1977 at a catalog store in Canada. It was HP and the instruction booklet explained that it was RPN and how RPN worked. So for the next 20 years I used various HP RPN calculators. I can't say that I developed a preference for RPN, either way is OK with me.

You can find a large variety of RPN calculators on eBay by searching for "RPN calculator".
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
IP calculator Blackmeth Slackware 7 08-13-2007 11:31 AM
Graphing Calculator Recommendations theeil Linux - Hardware 3 10-14-2006 06:53 PM
I need a calculator Starch Programming 5 02-14-2005 06:06 PM
A Calculator......... 320mb Programming 0 08-13-2004 04:55 PM
Calculator KyleYankan Linux - Software 6 08-03-2002 01:08 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:32 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration