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Old 09-02-2021, 05:07 PM   #1
Pen guin
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Backup strategy - where to put the files


I'm in the process of switching to Linux for everything except for Flight simulation and associated files...

As it stands now, I have Linux Mint on a 1TB NVMe M.3 drive. Windows 10 and installed programs are on a 1TB SSD (internal)

Windows Data and Windows Backups are on a 4 year old WD My Passport External Hard Drive.

That said, is it better to to:

Buy a Flash drive, and transfer the Windows Data onto that, thereby opening up over 400GB in that partition...But don't forget this is a 4 year old (portable) hard drive, that's plugged in all the time.

Then take it from the Flash Drive to where on the NVMe drive, where my Linux Mint installation is...

Or Buy a new external and create a partition for all Windows backups (X-Plane at that point) and associated files, and another partition for Linux Data...

Or, buy two separate drives one for each, one for Windows Backups, and the other for Linux Backups, which would include productivity software, etc.

Hopefully someone can enlighten me...

Thanks.
 
Old 09-02-2021, 05:18 PM   #2
jefro
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Your risk decides the choice. Personally I'd backup everything to a single dedicated removable drive. Too skerd to have any backup where a hacker could encrypt it.

Backups are like money. More is usually better.
 
Old 09-02-2021, 05:38 PM   #3
Pen guin
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Where would I put the Windows data files in a Linux Mint OS? They can be read by a Linux compatible software...like WPS, or LibreOffice.

Last edited by Pen guin; 09-02-2021 at 05:44 PM.
 
Old 09-02-2021, 07:15 PM   #4
jefro
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I guess I'll ask exactly what backup method are you using for Windows.
 
Old 09-03-2021, 08:00 PM   #5
Pen guin
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To backup my windows system, I'm using Acronis True Image 2017. Those files go on the F partition, i.e. where my Windows backups are...G is where my Windows Data is...
 
Old 09-03-2021, 08:25 PM   #6
enigma9o7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pen guin View Post
Where would I put the Windows data files in a Linux Mint OS? They can be read by a Linux compatible software...like WPS, or LibreOffice.
~/Documents

But if you're keeping dual boot with Windows, you could just simlink Documents to your windows documents folder. same with music, videos, downloads, etc...

Last edited by enigma9o7; 09-03-2021 at 08:27 PM.
 
Old 09-03-2021, 09:50 PM   #7
Pen guin
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Ok, thanks for the help.
 
Old 09-07-2021, 05:13 PM   #8
obobskivich
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It may be worth re-thinking 'backups' here - if there's common data (e.g. PDFs, media files, text documents, etc) that makes sense to ingest into the Linux system so you can continue using it, but having system backups for the Windows install is a good idea, which will be separate (because they'll likely be in the form of complete snapshots). I would not trust a 'flash drive' (I assume you mean a usb 'thumb drive' here) for backups, but an external SSD may be fine (although bear in a mind a lot of the complete retail ones use the cheapest possible SSDs, which are usually not great quality).

Ideally, depending on your risk and the importance of the data (e.g. can you not afford to lose this data? or is it just a hassle to re-install the OS + programs if a drive goes down?), having two external drives that you rotate for backups is probably the 'best' plan, and also keep the working data on the machine's internal storage as well (so it will exist in a total of 3 places, which aren't always connected to the running machine for reasons jefro points out in post #2). I'm also personally skeptical of keeping important data on the same partition as an OS in the event you need to reformat it can be a pain to 'pick at the carcass' of an old install (and often chews up a lot of time) versus knowing the data is sitting somewhere external the machine, and being able to just go ahead and get the box back up and running.
 
Old 09-15-2021, 01:04 PM   #9
SlowCoder
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A lot of people keep it simple and just create a partition and point /home to it. Simple and clean. Includes user data and configs. For backups, a lot of people like to use Timeshift.
I personally don't care to back up most of my config files, and like to separate my data from my system. My setup is a little more complicated, but works well for me:
sda1 = /boot
sda2 = swap
sda3 = / (root filesystem)
sda4 = data partition.

On my data partition, I recreated all the user directories from my home directory, e.g. Documents, Pictures, Music, Downloads, etc.
I remove the original directories from my home directory, and create symlinks pointing to the versions on my data partition.
I create a ~/bin directory, where I put any scripts, and create a symlink in my home directory.
I create a ~/bin/configs directory, where I copy any config files I want to be able to cross over, e.g. .bashrc, .conkyrc, my Chrome bookmarks. I create symlinks to them from their original locations.

All of this has been added to a script, so when I reinstall or change my Linux distro, I just run the script and everything is done quickly. My /home is not clogged with extraneous config and data files for apps I may or may not reinstall.

As for backups, I just use rsync, not Timeshift, I have 2 1GB USB hard drives that I alternately back up to every few weeks, unless there's been a big change in my data that I want to back up sooner. I will only back up to one, leaving the other alone. That way if I find that I'm missing files from one backup, I can revert to the previous backup.
 
  


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