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Old 07-04-2017, 02:16 PM   #91
Xeratul
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
nevertheless were intelligent and ingenious human beings. They would have found creative ways to solve problems without presupposing "thousands of human slaves to use as so many million-monkeys ..."
I believe so too. Maybe their skills and abilities are underestimated. There are many books about those mysteries of ancient egypt today on Amazon store.

Or maybe, there are some unknown power, unrevealed which made them outstanding in some kind.
 
Old 07-04-2017, 05:29 PM   #92
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Or maybe there are still a lot of pyramidiots spouting a load of nonsense.
 
Old 07-05-2017, 12:27 PM   #93
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Or maybe there are still a lot of pyramidiots spouting a load of nonsense.
As I've pointed out before, it is frighteningly easy for information to become lost. We almost lost access to the entire ancient Egyptian language. It would be extremely easy to lose information about their technology: unless they made a tomb-painting about it, with an illustration, all traces of the implements they used could disappear forever into the sands.

Some archaeologists are adamant about "evidence." Unless there is a picture, or a surviving artifact whose method-of-use is actually known (and correctly identified ... recall the humorous book about the toilet seat), they won't consider it.

There are many things which give no clue as to "how the trick was done." For instance, a plastic bottle gives no hint of the chemical polymerization plants that were used to produce the raw material, nor of the manufacturing plant which made the bottle. If we unearthed such a bottle (and, because they are virtually indestructible, some future historian will find millions of them), it might not be accompanied by any indication of how it was made. Yes, the process knowledge could become lost.

We see the Great Pyramids, knowing also that they used to be covered with beautiful fitted stone, but we see and know very little about how they were constructed. Until and unless we uncover an intact Egyptian engineering textbook, we will never have a great many answers that we desire. But what we do know is that these people were superlative civil engineers and project managers.
 
Old 07-06-2017, 05:42 PM   #94
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Not to put too fine a point on it, sundialsvcs, but it is rather unlikely that an older technology can't be determined, even it's source, unless that technology has gone out of common usage. Example - the iron dagger of King Tut. We still work in iron and we have such tools as spectroscopy and others that can determine that the iron very likely came from a meteorite. We may not know exactly how they achieved the temperatures to melt iron but we can estimate with very high odds. Example - It is far more likely that a leather bellows of sorts was used rather than 50 slaves all blowing in the direction of the fire, let alone that they had stumbled on electric fans.

In your case of plastic bottles, they might confuse Mad Max but assuming plastics are still in use and scientific tools still available, it just isn't hard to figure out within a narrow margin for error.

On the flip side of that we haven't stacked raw stone in centuries, so some of that, at least in specifics, has been lost. What we can surmise, since so many ancient civilizations obviously cut, transported very large stones and constructed monuments or monoliths that such development was not only common but part of a natural progression.

Last edited by enorbet; 07-06-2017 at 05:45 PM.
 
Old 07-07-2017, 06:42 AM   #95
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The remnants of metallurgy involve furnaces and stone, and usually leave behind slag that no one bothers to clean up. This is how archaeologists determine where ironworks might have been located even today. Also, of course, the implements produced are durable, and can be analyzed. But, even so, with the passage of many centuries and the inhospitable desert climate (as well as regular floods), many things can be ... lost forever.

We would probably be able to find ironmongers. We can do various kinds of objective tests on artifacts such as a dagger, or a mummy. We would be able to detect traces of an electrical power generation system. But we could find what could be a storage battery and not be able to conclusively say that it is, in fact, a storage battery. Neither might we have any idea what it was used for. Archaeologists have to work with whatever they discover, and they are trained not to "speculate" too much, although their work does involve a great deal of speculation.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 07-07-2017 at 06:43 AM.
 
Old 07-07-2017, 10:19 AM   #96
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I often wonder how long a modern computer or electronic gadget, exposed to the elements or buried, would retain enough characteristics for its underlying technology to be identified. Certainly decades. Probably centuries. But I'm skeptical about millennia. The technology could be lost.
 
Old 07-07-2017, 10:38 AM   #97
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I often wonder how long a modern computer or electronic gadget, exposed to the elements or buried, would retain enough characteristics for its underlying technology to be identified. Certainly decades. Probably centuries. But I'm skeptical about millennia. The technology could be lost.
Apple buried a ton of Lisa computers because they couldn't sell them to take a tax write-off. Maybe someone or something will find them in the far future...
 
Old 07-07-2017, 12:07 PM   #98
Xeratul
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Apple buried a ton of Lisa computers because they couldn't sell them to take a tax write-off. Maybe someone or something will find them in the far future...
Lisa computers, they could gave them for free to poor people.
 
  


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