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Old 07-14-2019, 02:57 PM   #1
RandomTroll
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Apollo 11's computer


Quote:
' fitting the autopilot software for the lunar lander into the tiny amount of memory available was not easy.
George Cherry of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology figured out an algorithm that would work. Richard Gran, a young engineer at Grumman, was sent to help. "That was really fun," he said.
Initially, the computer on the lunar module had 33 kilobytes of memory. Today's computers have millions of times more. A beefed up version doubled the memory to 66 kilobytes. "Once we got that additional memory, we had no trouble putting digital autopilot into that additional memory," Dr. Gran recalled.'
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/13/s...engineers.html
 
Old 07-14-2019, 06:10 PM   #2
ehartman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandomTroll View Post
Initially, the computer on the lunar module had 33 kilobytes of memory.
My first microcomputers were a lot smaller then that (and that was long after 1969):
256 BYTES of ram and a socket for a 8 KB PROM. The board had a 8085 cpu and some I/O ports too, for connecting the user interface (NO keyboard or screen).
We were building enbedded machines with that kind of mother boards and used a development CP/M system with a full 64KB of RAM (and a PROM burner) for the writing and debugging of the code to put into that PROM. Of course the target machine didn't have an O/S and all volatile data had to fit into those 256 bytes. In the beginning it was all (8080) assembler, later we got boards with a bit more of PROM space and used Pascal/MT+ (a real time/standalone version of CP/M Pascal).

I even remember we had to write a new bootloader for an old PDP-11 system with 32 KB of memory: that bootloader had to fit into less then 80 bytes (of ReadOnly static memory).

Last edited by ehartman; 07-14-2019 at 06:13 PM.
 
Old 07-14-2019, 07:44 PM   #3
scasey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
I even remember we had to write a new bootloader for an old PDP-11 system with 32 KB of memory: that bootloader had to fit into less then 80 bytes (of ReadOnly static memory).
Egad! One punch card!
 
Old 07-14-2019, 11:18 PM   #4
RandomTroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
My first microcomputers were a lot smaller then that (and that was long after 1969)...
You win!
 
  


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