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Old 08-26-2020, 11:00 AM   #31
DavidMcCann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
Decimal eggs are definitely new. They seem to have replaced dozens. It used to be either 6 or 12 when I was younger. I've never seen 4 though. Who would want to buy 4 eggs?
I haven't seen "decimal eggs" Who has them? As for who'd buy 4, surely anyone who shops for one and doesn't eat a lot of eggs!
 
Old 08-26-2020, 11:11 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
I haven't seen "decimal eggs" Who has them?
Tesco, for one!
 
Old 08-26-2020, 12:44 PM   #33
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The fresh food - ie perishable items - especially dairy - are in those refrigerated boxes that are actually open in the back and stocked from a long refrigerated room in the back. Produce shelves sometimes have water sprayers. Butchers have their own little area. And these all require water pipes and electric lines and whatnot... therefore these areas are located at the walls/edges of the store while the dry item shelves are in the middle. This from the smart guy who's main point was very simple: Real Food Rots. If it never goes bad, is it real food at all? Dried pasta, yes, that stuff will survive a nuclear holocaust, but what about "twinkies"? There is something wrong with a piece of bread that comes sealed in plastic and never rots. What the hell is it? The guy's point was that if you want fresh, more natural foods, only shop from the walls and edges of the store. Except for pasta of course. We Pastafarians must enjoy our Holy Monster's noodly appendages. YAR!
 
Old 08-26-2020, 01:32 PM   #34
hazel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhyader View Post
The guy's point was that if you want fresh, more natural foods, only shop from the walls and edges of the store.
Doesn't work for meat, unless you get it from the butcher's counter. Ready-packed raw meat is in the aisles. Or do you classify that with ready-packed bread?
 
Old 08-26-2020, 05:09 PM   #35
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In my area, fresh meat is always in the rear, perhaps so the butchers don't have to transport it far. Some places like WalMart have some fresh meat in coolers away from the aisle, but only a cart lane, so shoppers can access it from either side of the cart. But I don't shop there. Processed meat like sausage, bacon, etc are in the same area, as is cheese, although it could be on a different wall near the dairy products. Obviously someone has invested a great deal of time and effort in grocery store layout and design.
 
Old 08-26-2020, 05:17 PM   #36
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There is a huge design issue with markets. They WANT you to slow down and buy more. By the time you walk all over the store you are too tired to notice the price is wrong at the register.
 
Old 08-26-2020, 05:23 PM   #37
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That sounds right.
 
Old 08-27-2020, 06:20 AM   #38
hazel
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Today I was in Tesco again and I looked at those 10-packs of eggs. They are all marked as reduced now, with the original 2 price crossed out. Obviously no one was buying at that price. I think now that what I saw on Monday was just laziness like rtmistler suggested: they had all been reduced that day, but the shelf-stacker only tore the 2 label off one of the three stacks for my benefit.

Last edited by hazel; 08-27-2020 at 06:21 AM.
 
Old 08-27-2020, 02:43 PM   #39
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Here, (USA/CA), there is no raw meat in the aisles. Frozen meat, yes, prepackaged, is in refrigerated boxes, but raw meat is only at the "meat" counter or the refrigerated showcases that the "meat people" stock, which they prepare and wrap themselves, which are not surprisingly near the butcher's alcove and along the walls/edges of the store.
BUT... What I like is the local little market. The Mexican butcher there makes all kind of things. Every day there is pre-made fajita mix, carne al pastor, marinated beefsteaks, fish fillets, and all kinds of stuff. Once, he made chincharones (porkskins). They are very different when they are real, not the ones that come in a plastic bag.
 
Old 08-27-2020, 08:03 PM   #40
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I assume they don't refrigerate eggs in the UK like other parts of Europe?

I used to eat food at a place called Taco Flats, their sign slogan was "Over 10,000 tacos returned" (opposed to McD's)
Not sure I'd ever buy meat at our local carniceria though. And I used to buy street food in various third world countries. (I used to drink back then)
 
Old 08-28-2020, 04:52 AM   #41
hazel
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Originally Posted by jefro View Post
I assume they don't refrigerate eggs in the UK like other parts of Europe?
They don't in the shops, no. Most people put them in the fridge when they get home. But I remember a cousin of mine in France saying that you shouldn't refrigerate eggs but just keep them reasonably cool. She kept hers in an egg rack on one of the shelves in her country kitchen.

@rhyader. In the UK, raw meat is packaged in the supermarket's meat facility and the sealed packages are simply placed on shelves, not necessarily near the butchery. They are not enclosed in a refrigerated space like the frozen goods. I suppose that sealing the meat preserves it from atmospheric spoilage and makes refrigeration unnecessary.

I can still remember how meat used to be sold when I was growing up. We had a butcher's shop just around the corner and it had dead animal carcases hanging from hooks on the ceiling. The floor was covered in sawdust to catch any dripping blood. The butcher chopped a carcase up from time to time to fill the shelves. He sold the offals too -- brains, tripe, the lot -- and anything that was left over was used to make sausages and black puddings. The bones were sold for soup. Towards Christmas, birds for roasting were hung up by their feet along the awning over the pavement, with the necks still unplucked so that you could see if it was a goose or a turkey. I always looked forward to that sight because it meant that Christmas was coming.

Last edited by hazel; 08-28-2020 at 04:57 AM.
 
Old 08-28-2020, 08:01 AM   #42
boughtonp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
Most people put them in the fridge when they get home.
I don't know anyone who puts eggs in the fridge.

I've seen fridges with spaces for eggs, but never in use. I guess some people might make use of those, but since eggs are stored on shelves and do not contain any "keep refrigerated" instructions on the packet, it seems far more likely that most people do not.

A quick search suggests it is recommended in the US to protect from salmonella (due to the way farmers in the US wash the shells and don't vaccinate their hens), but is not an issue with the lion-marked eggs sold in UK supermarkets.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/nadiaar...nd-vice-versa/

 
Old 08-28-2020, 11:07 AM   #43
ondoho
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Originally Posted by hazel View Post
I always use it if there are alternatives on offer. I check the unit price and go for the cheapest, especially when buying meat. My mother taught me how to shop.
Frankly I consider this normal.
Not that i always buy the cheapest, but to be conscious of how much things cost, to compare and calculate. I do not understand how people could expect shopping to be anything else.
Quote:
she could memorise prices and knew if something was cheaper in a particular shop. She would go in, buy the loss leader and march out again to do the rest of her shopping somewhere else.
I used to do that, but it really takes time.
Also, there isn't so many separate shops for everyday products anymore. It's all mallification...
Quote:
I do now click on the privacy pop-up they have to show you under GDPR and switch off everything I can. But often I find that it's already switched off because I've used that site before.
I hope the EU GDPR is a little bit more than "privacy pop-ups"...

BTW, this just popped up on my radar. On topic: It's called "Shopping". I hope you all understand the lyrics, because they're hilarious
 
Old 08-28-2020, 11:29 AM   #44
DavidMcCann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
I can still remember how meat used to be sold when I was growing up. … The butcher chopped a carcass up from time to time to fill the shelves. … Towards Christmas, birds for roasting were hung up by their feet along the awning over the pavement, with the necks still unplucked so that you could see if it was a goose or a turkey. I always looked forward to that sight because it meant that Christmas was coming.
We still have a couple of "proper butchers" here. On Christmas Eve people queue in the street to collect the fresh, un-refrigerated birds they've ordered.
 
Old 08-28-2020, 11:57 AM   #45
hazel
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I remember reading somewhere about a man's bewilderment when he took his family from the US to Europe for a holiday and saw his little daughter's horror at her first sight of a butcher's shop. Up to that point she hadn't realised that meat was dead animals and he hadn't realised that she didn't know.

It's interesting that when people went to butcher's shops and not supermarkets, there were few vegetarians around and no vegans.
 
  


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