LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Fedora
User Name
Password
Fedora This forum is for the discussion of the Fedora Project.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 02-02-2005, 11:45 PM   #1
linmix
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Spain
Distribution: FC5
Posts: 1,993
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 46
System Monitor questions


While checking out all the possibilities of the Gnome panels I've put the system monitor on my panel and I'm very surprised to see that after login it indicates a memory use of 90%, 40% of which is cache. I've got 504Mb RAM (according to the resource monitor, 512 according to the specs) and another 500+ Swap. Am I really using all that memory???

It appears not, because if I open the resource manager and go to the Resource Monitor tab it indicates I'm using about 140Mb RAM and some 270 swap.

So what exactly does the 90% indicated on my panel mean?

The Resource Monitor also indicates the device usage, which includes a /dev/shm type: tmpfs, size 252Mb used: 0%
It doesn't appear to be a partition, but what exactly is it?

In the Process listing tab I can choose to display only active processes, but it never displays any as active. However, the system monitor is running on the panel, I'm listening to music so both the sound server and Xmms are active and I'm writing this message. What does it take for a process to be listed as active?
 
Old 02-03-2005, 01:41 AM   #2
dalek
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Mississippi USA
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 2,058
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 79
This gets asked about once a week. Linux uses memory different than windoze does. It will use as much memory as it can to cache things it uses a lot. That way it doesn't have to wait on the hard drive to get data. I have 1GB in mine and it fills up pretty regular. It does this to make the system more efficient.

Remember, Linux started out as a server OS. That is why it is more stable, secure and runs as efficient as possible. Windoze, just runs, well, most of the time anyway.

If you notice that you are using more than about 30MBs of swap then you may need more memory. Other than that, don't worry about the memory usage. You have plenty for most Linux apps.

Later

 
Old 02-03-2005, 08:46 AM   #3
linmix
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Spain
Distribution: FC5
Posts: 1,993

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 46
Still, that doesn't explain the difference between the 90% indicated and the less than 50% it actually uses...

as I wrote, my system is using some 270Mb swap (you say 30+) but only 140 out of 512 Ram. Did you miss a zero there?
 
Old 02-03-2005, 12:35 PM   #4
dalek
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Mississippi USA
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 2,058
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 79
A lot of that depends on what applications you are using. If you are using something that is large and uses a lot of memory then it will use a lot more swap. You may want to search for memory cache and then put my name in the box on the right for user name. I, and others, have discussed this issue at length.

It appears that what you have is normal. Linux is different. It makes hardware do as much work as possible which makes the software faster and makes the user happier.

I did a quick search for ya:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...readid=260022&

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...readid=185925&

There are others. There is one that I read a long time ago that links to a site that explains it better. I didn't respond so I have no clue which one it was. It's in there with the other several hundred thousand threads.

Type in free and see what it reports. Another good one is to type in top and then hit the "m" key to sort the list by memory usage. That will tell you what is actually used like this:

Code:
root@smoker / # free
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:       1034728    1028968       5760          0     252248     330496
-/+ buffers/cache:     446224     588504
Swap:       488336       7596     480740
root@smoker / #
Code:
top - 12:30:08 up 85 days,  6:06,  4 users,  load average: 0.40, 0.91, 0.92
Tasks:  91 total,   2 running,  88 sleeping,   0 stopped,   1 zombie
Cpu(s):  0.3% us,  0.3% sy,  0.0% ni, 99.3% id,  0.0% wa,  0.0% hi,  0.0% si
Mem:   1034728k total,   957732k used,    76996k free,   252300k buffers
Swap:   488336k total,     7596k used,   480740k free,   314144k cached

  PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND
27593 root      15   0  207m  76m 140m S  0.0  7.6  18:41.52 X
27999 dale      15   0 97640  70m  39m S  0.0  7.0   6:31.39 mozilla-bin
28003 dale      16   0 97640  70m  39m S  0.0  7.0   0:00.01 mozilla-bin
28004 dale      16   0 97640  70m  39m S  0.0  7.0   0:00.52 mozilla-bin
28008 dale      15   0 97640  70m  39m S  0.0  7.0   0:04.29 mozilla-bin
28067 dale      16   0 97640  70m  39m S  0.0  7.0   0:00.00 mozilla-bin
28068 dale      16   0 97640  70m  39m S  0.0  7.0   0:00.00 mozilla-bin
28070 dale      16   0 97640  70m  39m S  0.0  7.0   0:00.00 mozilla-bin
27916 dale      15   0 61360  49m  23m S  0.0  4.9   8:19.74 kdeinit
18722 root      15   0 39016  26m  30m S  0.0  2.6   0:01.70 konqueror
27918 dale      15   0 30868  20m  25m S  0.0  2.0   1:43.83 kdeinit
27928 dale      16   0 30072  19m  24m S  0.0  1.9   0:00.66 kgpg
27941 dale      16   0 30616  18m  24m R  0.0  1.9   0:04.81 kdeinit
27942 dale      15   0 28384  18m  22m S  0.0  1.8   0:22.37 kpat
27931 dale      15   0 27324  17m  22m S  0.0  1.7   0:01.58 kppp
27911 dale      16   0 28208  16m  22m S  0.0  1.7   0:03.92 kdeinit
 3616 root      16   0 28540  16m  23m S  0.0  1.7   0:00.35 kdeinit
27888 dale      15   0 29536  16m  23m S  0.0  1.6   0:05.58 kdeinit
18704 dale      15   0 26588  16m  21m S  0.0  1.6   0:00.69 kdesu
27906 dale      16   0 32260  15m  29m S  0.0  1.6   0:00.65 kdeinit
27915 dale      16   0 25504  13m  22m S  0.0  1.4   0:01.28 kdeinit
27984 root      15   0 24508  13m  21m S  0.0  1.3   0:02.12 kdeinit
27909 dale      16   0 25052  13m  22m S  0.0  1.3   0:00.19 kdeinit
27919 dale      16   0 25692  12m  23m S  0.0  1.2   0:00.00 kdeinit
18725 root      17   0 25072  12m  22m S  0.0  1.2   0:00.00 kdeinit
27977 root      16   0 23820  11m  21m S  0.0  1.1   0:00.25 kdeinit
27880 dale      16   0 24316  11m  21m S  0.0  1.1   0:00.26 kdeinit
27959 dale      20   0 24392  11m  23m S  0.0  1.1   0:00.02 kalarmd
27982 root      16   0 23496  10m  22m S  0.0  1.1   0:00.05 kdeinit
27885 dale      16   0 24080  10m  22m S  0.0  1.1   0:00.06 kdeinit
27933 dale      15   0 15252 9.9m  11m S  0.0  1.0   1:21.33 gkrellm2
27944 dale      16   0 15252 9.9m  11m S  0.0  1.0   0:00.88 gkrellm2
27980 root      15   0 22292 9.9m  21m S  0.0  1.0   0:00.02 kdeinit
27883 dale      15   0 22328 9636  21m S  0.0  0.9   0:00.27 kdeinit
27932 root      16   0 22408 9288  21m S  0.0  0.9   0:00.00 kppp
27904 dale     -51   0 11460 6216  10m S  0.0  0.6   0:00.17 artsd
27955 dale      16   0 15728 6052  14m S  0.0  0.6   0:00.00 kdesud
12725 ntp       16   0  3980 3980 3104 S  0.0  0.4   0:00.21 ntpd
28006 dale      16   0  3940 2380 3172 S  0.0  0.2   0:00.07 gconfd-2
 9212 root      15   0 12596 2160  10m S  0.0  0.2   0:22.39 artsd
 9213 root      16   0 12596 2160  10m S  0.0  0.2   0:05.75 artsd
16678 root      16   0  6016 1820 3144 S  0.0  0.2   0:02.59 cupsd
28020 root      16   0  2328 1452 2128 S  0.0  0.1   0:00.04 bash
 8278 root      15   0  2328 1420 2128 S  0.0  0.1   0:00.01 bash
27810 root      16   0  3476 1292 2924 S  0.0  0.1   0:00.00 kdm
27989 dale      15   0  2616 1128 1932 S  0.0  0.1   0:00.00 mozilla
  518 xfs       16   0  4364 1108 2620 S  0.0  0.1   0:00.18 xfs
30506 root      21   5  3876 1104 3172 S  0.0  0.1   0:00.10 gconfd-2
root@smoker / #
I made that as long as I can. Yes, the uptime is correct. I have been up 85 days, and counting. You may notice that X is using a lot and Mozilla. If you notice yours doing the same, you can logout then log back in to correct the one for the GUI.. I do that on occasion to free up some memory. I have a slideshow on my desktop. I only do that every couple weeks or if I update KDE or xorg. I have the cache turned up on Mozilla since I am on dial-up. It is pretty large, about 300MBs.

Post what you get to those. I'll look at it and see what I see.

Later

 
Old 02-03-2005, 03:44 PM   #5
linmix
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Spain
Distribution: FC5
Posts: 1,993

Original Poster
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 46
I'm on a dial-up as well, and I have a cahce of 90000kb, and find it to be small. Is that the cache the system monitor refers to? I'm not worried about the memory usage. The system responds great, and as long as it keeps responding it's fine with me. I'm curious to know a little more about how it all works though and I'll take a hard look at the links you posted.

Her's my top:
Code:
top - 22:39:14 up 12:04,  2 users,  load average: 0.03, 0.08, 0.03
Tasks: 107 total,   2 running, 105 sleeping,   0 stopped,   0 zombie
Cpu(s):  2.7% us,  0.5% sy,  0.0% ni, 96.8% id,  0.0% wa,  0.0% hi,  0.0% si

  PID USER      PR  NI  VIRT  RES  SHR S %CPU %MEM    TIME+  COMMAND
 2987 root      16   0  105m  21m  91m R  1.6  4.3   2:19.95 X
 4380 jetro     15   0 35940  11m  19m S  0.8  2.4   0:01.30 gnome-terminal
 4587 jetro     15   0 95896  26m  29m S  0.3  5.3   0:04.20 firefox-bin
 4605 jetro     17   0  3352  960 1664 R  0.3  0.2   0:00.34 top
    1 root      16   0  3412  564 1408 S  0.0  0.1   0:00.83 init
    2 root      34  19     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.03 ksoftirqd/0
    3 root       5 -10     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.04 events/0
    4 root       6 -10     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 khelper
    5 root      15 -10     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kacpid
   27 root       5 -10     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kblockd/0
   37 root      20   0     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 pdflush
   38 root      15   0     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.06 pdflush
   40 root      10 -10     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 aio/0
   28 root      16   0     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 khubd
   39 root      15   0     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.77 kswapd0
  113 root      25   0     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 kseriod
  199 root       6 -10     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 ata/0
  201 root      21   0     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 scsi_eh_0
  202 root      22   0     0    0    0 S  0.0  0.0   0:00.00 scsi_eh_1
Pity I rebooted just before reading your message. I'd been up for a week - never got past a day without troubles in window.

oh, and free:
Code:
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:        515812     508732       7080          0     179796     151496
-/+ buffers/cache:     177440     338372
Swap:       538168         28     538140
 
Old 02-03-2005, 06:29 PM   #6
dalek
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Mississippi USA
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 2,058
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 79
Everything I see looks normal. You have over 300MBs just in cache and in buffers. That is where the speed increase comes from. That is fine and looks normal. You are actually only using about 170MBs for the system. That's about right. I must admit I have a lot of stuff running on mine. I have 90 processes running as I type.

It may also be noted that some things are run purely in memory. Most of the stuff in /sys are in memory but are very small. You can test this by booting from a CD and mounting the partition and looking at what all disappears. All the temp and fan stuff and other sensor data is gone.

512MBs is a sweet spot for Linux with a GUI running. I had 512 in mine for a long time and I use KDE. It is a little faster with 1GB but not a whole lot. If you where running a server or doing some mean things with GIMP, same as photoshop, or something more may be needed. Most likely for what you are doing, you will be fine for quite some time.

I have seen people running very well with 64MBs of memory. I had 128MBs in my old 400MHz system. It has since died. No more booting.

It all appears to be mormal. As for the uptime. There is a system I saw on TV that a ISP uses. It was used for one of their connection points. The system people like you and me connect to the net with. It had been running for over 5 years with no reboot. I seriously doubt windoze could do that. According to the guy that ran it, the only time they messed with it was to add users or delete users and the occasional security fix. If you have your system configured properly it can run for ages. I run Gentoo on a compiled kernel. I have a CyberPower 1250 UPS to help with power problems, other than that, I just run Linux.

It's supper time. I wonder which critter I will eat this time. I have already had Mr Piggy and Ms cow.

Later

 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
system monitor sharpie Linux - Software 2 12-11-2004 03:58 PM
Questions about Monitor cleaning... Neo_Tux Linux - Hardware 2 08-08-2004 03:17 PM
System Monitor don_dimo Linux - Software 3 05-13-2004 06:26 PM
system monitor mattuc Linux - Newbie 4 04-26-2004 06:29 PM
System Monitor jt1020 Linux - General 3 08-31-2003 02:04 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Fedora

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:13 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration