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Old 08-04-2011, 01:42 AM   #1
Iridiumx2
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Root Account Not Showing At Login...


Hello all... I just installed Debian 6 on a server and when the server powers up, it shows me all the accounts I created in order for me to choose and login under an account, except for the root account. At the colo where the server is going, they need the root account at the login screen. Thanks
 
Old 08-04-2011, 01:46 AM   #2
acid_kewpie
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This is the xwindows login? You should never run x as root. If you need to run graphical tools as root you should sudo or su to root from a normal account.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 02:24 AM   #3
lugoteehalt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie View Post
This is the xwindows login? You should never run x as root. If you need to run graphical tools as root you should sudo or su to root from a normal account.
Don't think I'm hijacking thread by asking: Does this mean that one should not become root when inside X - X having been started as an ordinary user? You know, it is always encouraging you to give the root password, to install updates for instance, and it always worries me.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 02:26 AM   #4
Iridiumx2
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Yep i know, but the colo network admins demand that there may be a way for them to log in as root if they need to. They are used to CentOS and are not used to Debian. Thanks
 
Old 08-04-2011, 02:30 AM   #5
acid_kewpie
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well then they should flip to a virtual console and log in there. If these "admins" need a gui then they are big girls blouses. Mind you I've no idea what this login screen looks like, can you not just type the name in?
 
Old 08-04-2011, 02:32 AM   #6
acid_kewpie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lugoteehalt View Post
Don't think I'm hijacking thread by asking: Does this mean that one should not become root when inside X - X having been started as an ordinary user? You know, it is always encouraging you to give the root password, to install updates for instance, and it always worries me.
no, the Xwindows server processes are not running as root that way, that's the point. In terms of installing updates, I'd generally do that via sudo, so never use the root password. Various gnome gui tools and things tend to use root though if that's what you mean.
 
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Old 08-04-2011, 03:08 AM   #7
XavierP
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Debian (or Gnome) disabled it by design. You can fix it in the config files, but you lose a lot of security and the option to find out who issued "rm -rf /" as root if it is enabled. Your colo poeple, as professionals, should know how and why to use sudo.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 05:58 AM   #8
cynwulf
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There is no need to use sudo... open a terminal emulator:

Code:
su
command1
command2
command3
exit
Code:
su -c 'command'
Code:
gksu command
Code:
gksu command &
If you need to log in to an x session as root though, you're doing something wrong. I'll skip the lecture as to why it's such a bad idea - but there is simply no need for it.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 06:12 AM   #9
acid_kewpie
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what do you mean, no "need" to sudo?? It's generally better to use sudo than su. sudo isn't a hassle.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 07:16 AM   #10
j1alu
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If you want to run gui-apps _and_ got gdm running neither su nor sudo will help. sux or gksu will.

I can't see a hassle in using su. I can see one in setting up sudo properly.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 08:45 AM   #11
cynwulf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie View Post
what do you mean, no "need" to sudo??
As a replacement for:

Code:
su
command1
command2
command3
exit
There is no "need" for sudo - it's simply down to preference.

If say I want to set up my normal user to shutdown from a window manager (only one example) - there is a "need" for sudo (i.e. nothing else would do the job as simply and efficiently) and that's where it absolutely shines.

Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie View Post
It's generally better to use sudo than su.
In your opinion of course?

Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie View Post
sudo isn't a hassle.
Neither is:

Code:
su
command1
command2
command3
exit
 
Old 08-04-2011, 04:46 PM   #12
XavierP
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On a home PC - single user - yes, su is more convenient. On a multi admin site you need a sane way to log changes, su will not give you this.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 06:11 PM   #13
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie View Post
well then they should flip to a virtual console and log in there. If these "admins" need a gui then they are big girls blouses. Mind you I've no idea what this login screen looks like, can you not just type the name in?
I can only second that. If those people really need to log in as root to a graphical session you should change your "admins", not the system.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 08:47 PM   #14
j1alu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XavierP View Post
On a home PC - single user - yes, su is more convenient. On a multi admin site you need a sane way to log changes, su will not give you this.
That is very different from what you said in the first place:
Quote:
what do you mean, no "need" to sudo?? It's generally better to use sudo than su. sudo isn't a hassle.
and to that i answered.
 
Old 08-04-2011, 09:13 PM   #15
frankbell
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In GDM, before you log in, look for a "Configure the Login Manager" menu item (I forget the exact wording).

Open that (it will ask for a password) and look for a setting to "Allow local administrator." That will unlock the root login for the GDM.

I'm not going to get involved in the login or not login as root debate.
 
  


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