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-   -   Kernel 2.6.28: anything I should know? (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/debian-26/kernel-2-6-28-anything-i-should-know-707918/)

jdkaye 02-27-2009 02:53 AM

Kernel 2.6.28: anything I should know?
 
I see that the kernel package linux-image-2.6.28-1-686 is now in Squeeze. I'd like to upgrade from 2.6.26. Is there anything I should know or is it safe to go ahead? I'm just looking for a little reassurance from those who are already running the 2.6.28 kernel.
TIA,
jdk

David the H. 02-27-2009 04:33 AM

Why bother asking us? Simply install it and try it out. Just be sure to keep at least one working older kernel installed as well, and/or have a good live CD at hand (I've recently discovered the excellent System Rescue CD), in case something breaks. You an always go back and uninstall it if you want to.

For a good general rundown on what changes there are in each kernel release, I recommend LinuxChanges.

jdkaye 02-27-2009 04:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David the H. (Post 3459182)
Why bother asking us? Simply install it and try it out. Just be sure to keep at least one working older kernel installed as well, and/or have a good live CD at hand (I've recently discovered the excellent System Rescue CD), in case something breaks. You an always go back and uninstall it if you want to.

For a good general rundown on what changes there are in each kernel release, I recommend LinuxChanges.

Thanks David. I'll do just that.
cheers,
jdk

jdkaye 02-27-2009 08:51 AM

I was a bit hasty anyway. I can't install 2.6.28 because I can't install the headers and since I compile a lot of stuff against the kernel (modules) I can't use a kernel without the headers. I can't install linux-headers-2.6.28 because linux-kbuild-2.6.28 isn't available yet. I'll have to wait a while.
Cheers,
jdk

restless 02-28-2009 02:55 AM

hey jdkaye,

building your own kbuild package isn't that hard.. please follow the following link:
http://wiki.debian.org/HowToRebuildA...nKernelPackage (section How to build linux-kbuild-2.6 yourself)

but if you're using m-a to build a lot of your modules, then please not that if you want to build nvidia drivers from the non-free branch, you'll run into trouble because there isn't a package for kernel 2.6.28 yet.

other than that, go for it, good luck.

jdkaye 02-28-2009 04:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by restless (Post 3460199)
hey jdkaye,

building your own kbuild package isn't that hard.. please follow the following link:
http://wiki.debian.org/HowToRebuildA...nKernelPackage (section How to build linux-kbuild-2.6 yourself)

but if you're using m-a to build a lot of your modules, then please not that if you want to build nvidia drivers from the non-free branch, you'll run into trouble because there isn't a package for kernel 2.6.28 yet.

other than that, go for it, good luck.

Thanks Restless,
I do use m-a to build modules but for ATI drivers (among other things) rather than nvidia ones. In any event I am in no rush but I will have a look at the link you sent to see how it's done if I ever really need to do it.
Cheers,
jdk

rkelsen 02-28-2009 05:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdkaye (Post 3459414)
I was a bit hasty anyway. I can't install 2.6.28 because I can't install the headers and since I compile a lot of stuff against the kernel (modules) I can't use a kernel without the headers.

You should only upgrade your kernel headers when (if) you intend to compile a new version of glibc against them. Your glibc package and the headers it was compiled against should be considered to be two packages joined at the hip. One should not be upgraded without the other.

There is nothing wrong with using a kernel-headers package which is much older than your currently-running kernel. In fact, that's how it should be if you're running the latest kernel on an older installation.

This rule applies even if you're compiling kernel modules.

jdkaye 02-28-2009 08:17 AM

Thanks RK,
You learn something new every day :)
Cheers,
jdk

AlucardZero 02-28-2009 08:39 AM

What? Really?

Telemachos 02-28-2009 09:23 AM

Rkelsen's advice strikes me as the Slackware style. Debian doesn't handle things quite that way, as I understand it.

Edit: I'm no expert on any of this. In fact, I've never fully understood the Slackware position or the Debian position or how/why they're so different. However, I can say that if you build modules (eg, for wireless or graphics) in Debian using module-assistant, then part of what the module-assistant tool does is automatically install the kernel headers for your running kernel to build the module against. So, I've always assumed this is simply a difference in how Debian deals with kernel headers (as opposed to Slack or other distros like it).

jdkaye 02-28-2009 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Telemachos (Post 3460447)
Rkelsen's advice strikes me as the Slackware style. Debian doesn't handle things quite that way, as I understand it.

Edit: I'm no expert on any of this. In fact, I've never fully understood the Slackware position or the Debian position or how/why they're so different. However, I can say that if you build modules (eg, for wireless or graphics) in Debian using module-assistant, then part of what the module-assistant tool does is automatically install the kernel headers for your running kernel to build the module against. So, I've always assumed this is simply a difference in how Debian deals with kernel headers (as opposed to Slack or other distros like it).

That was my understanding also but I thought I was mistaken. So maybe AlucardZero's scepticism was well placed ;) I guess I didn't learn anything today.:cry:
Cheers,
jdk

restless 03-01-2009 06:58 AM

I can confirm that m-a will indeed download the kernel headers for your current running kernel. You can however specify which kernel directory to use as well to build the modules against, this in my experience tends to fail however. (i think it's the m-a "-k" switch)

jdkaye 03-01-2009 07:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by restless (Post 3461262)
I can confirm that m-a will indeed download the kernel headers for your current running kernel. You can however specify which kernel directory to use as well to build the modules against, this in my experience tends to fail however. (i think it's the m-a "-k" switch)

I checked out that kbuild link you suggested and ... I'll wait. Too busy answering questions on LQ ;)
Cheers,
jdk

rkelsen 03-01-2009 06:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Telemachos (Post 3460447)
Rkelsen's advice strikes me as the Slackware style. Debian doesn't handle things quite that way, as I understand it.

It should be the same. This is generic advice, not Slackware specific.

Telemachos 03-01-2009 06:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rkelsen (Post 3461749)
It should be the same. This is generic advice, not Slackware specific.

Yup, well, I'm not sure what to say to you other than that it doesn't seem to be true of Debian. Debian's own tools will automatically download and install headers for the running kernel before building a module for wireless or video, the Debian kernel handbook mentions getting headers for the kernel you plan to build modules against, and pretty much every tutorial for building a kernel in Debian I've read mentions building headers as well as a kernel package when using make-kpkg.


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