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Old 02-18-2017, 02:44 PM   #1
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how do I create a permanent mount point with the "NEW" /etc/fstab


Well it's new to me anyway. when I had other distros installed I always created permanent mount points. for example
Code:
 /dev/sda1 /mnt/kubuntu
. But with the new UUID numbers I dont see how that works
thanks
 
Old 02-18-2017, 03:02 PM   #2
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You don't have to use UUID if you don't want to. You can continue to create permanent mount points the old way. What you typed in your post is improper fstab syntax under the old way however. It's not that hard under the new UUID way. By way of comparison-
Old:
Code:
 <device file>  <mount point>  <filesytem type>  <options> <dump> <pass>
UUID:
Code:
<UUID of device> <mount point>  <filesytem type>  <options> <dump> <pass>
To determine the UUID of the partition you want to create an fstab entry for run:
Code:
sudo blkid -s UUID
That will give the UUIDs for every partition on your system.
 
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Old 02-18-2017, 03:23 PM   #3
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Thanks for the help.
 
Old 02-18-2017, 03:43 PM   #4
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A potentially useful command it:
Code:
ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid/
The UUIDs can then be pasted into fstab. On a modern* system with more than one storage device it is generally not a good idea to use identifiers such as /dev/sda in fstab as the order that devices are found cannot be guaranteed to be consistent.

*I say modern, I've had issues with inconsistent drive labelling going back a decade is that modern?
 
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Old 02-18-2017, 03:52 PM   #5
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Well I haven't used linux in about 5 years so I don't know when it changed but I don't remember having problems
 
Old 02-18-2017, 03:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystified View Post
Well I haven't used linux in about 5 years so I don't know when it changed but I don't remember having problems
It's not guaranteed to be a problem but it used to be fairly common a few years back.
I think it was in the transition when SATA came on board and was treated as SCSI but, of course, is of a different architecture. Possibly it no longer happens now that SATA's normal.
 
Old 02-18-2017, 04:08 PM   #7
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well like I said I was out of commission for a while. I don't have problems with the changes but a lot of things are causing problems because it's a steep learning curve for me and I'm sure you can understand why I sometimes get frustrated. It's like learning all over again which is not as frustrating as finding out how much I've forgotten!!
 
Old 02-18-2017, 04:11 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystified View Post
well like I said I was out of commission for a while. I don't have problems with the changes but a lot of things are causing problems because it's a steep learning curve for me and I'm sure you can understand why I sometimes get frustrated. It's like learning all over again which is not as frustrating as finding out how much I've forgotten!!
I don't tend to get it as much with Linux (got it all the time with Windows) but I know what you mean. I will say that, while it's more difficult, the UUID method change is something I find a good change.
 
Old 02-18-2017, 04:19 PM   #9
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Now that I have a little more knowledge I think it's fine, And not to step on anybodies toes but some of the things that people say have made linux easier seem more difficult to me. But like I said I have a lot to learn and once I'm more familiar I'm sure I won't have any problems. Fingers crossed
 
Old 02-18-2017, 04:24 PM   #10
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I sometimes prefer something slightly more complex which is more robust -- is the easiest way I can explain why I prefer UUIDs.
 
Old 02-19-2017, 08:29 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kilgoretrout View Post
You don't have to use UUID if you don't want to. You can continue to create permanent mount points the old way. What you typed in your post is improper fstab syntax under the old way however. It's not that hard under the new UUID way. By way of comparison-
Old:
Code:
 <device file>  <mount point>  <filesytem type>  <options> <dump> <pass>
UUID:
Code:
<UUID of device> <mount point>  <filesytem type>  <options> <dump> <pass>
To determine the UUID of the partition you want to create an fstab entry for run:
Code:
sudo blkid -s UUID
That will give the UUIDs for every partition on your system.
I just wanted to clarify that the example I gave was knowingly incomplete. I was only interested in the first part. I don't want anyone to think I'm THAT dumb!!!
 
Old 02-21-2017, 05:36 AM   #12
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I like LABEL's better than UUID's - same advantages but more readable.
 
Old 02-21-2017, 06:09 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by descendant_command View Post
I like LABEL's better than UUID's - same advantages but more readable.
Either works for me but care must be taken if ataching devices from other machines in case the labels ("home" for example) are duplicates.
 
Old 02-22-2017, 02:11 AM   #14
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Indeed.
I use "unique" labels for my externals and it's trivial to re-label if required for 'special cases'.
Although UUID collisions can happen too - with cloned partitions etc.
 
Old 02-22-2017, 09:01 PM   #15
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I learned to understand UUIDs and fstab from this tutorial.

https://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-...-update-fstab/

I use UUIDs all the time now.
 
  


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