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Old 10-31-2004, 01:17 PM   #1
steefje
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debian base install: afterwards => xfree86


hi i just installed latest debian base
got x-window-system
xserver-xfree86
gnome
fluxbox
with apt

i've got a rather simple problem ...
i did the xf86config in terminal as su
did everything normal there
set horizontal hrz as 1280*1024 @ 75 hz (highest i could choose)
vertical 50-90 hz (not shure if that is correct ...)
choose generic nvidia card (have a nvidia geforce 4 mx 440, normally works perfectly with basic xf86configuration) etcetc

when in gnome : if trying to change screen resolution , the highest resolution i can choose is 800*600 @ 85 hz

does anyone know how this can be ??
 
Old 10-31-2004, 02:46 PM   #2
darkleaf
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In your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4 file there are a few lines with resolutions. Just add the resolution you want before it. I don't know why it doesn't work the other way but if you add your resolution to all your lines you can later switch to them in gnome and in fluxbox it'll go automatically
 
Old 11-01-2004, 12:51 PM   #3
steefje
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thx i did what you said, and also changed v-sync , works now (1280*1024 @ 75 hz) although i 'd like i to be 85 hz but hey i can't complain
 
Old 11-01-2004, 03:12 PM   #4
SolarBear
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steefje : Hey, since you happen to have the same gfx card as I do, do you have display problems ? I always a display that does not fit my screen (like if you messed with your monitor's vertical or horizontal settings), and I wonder if it's the FX440's fault or my own ignorance
 
Old 11-02-2004, 09:33 AM   #5
macondo
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Hacking the XFConfig-4 file a la Slackware is not a good idea, that's why Debian uses Debconf.

Your resolution is given as the result of the combination of information, given by you about your video card, monitors frequencies, to debconf..

Guessing about your horizontal and vertical frequencies is foolish, it could be detrimental to your monitor and will give you a resolution based on that bogus information. For a step by step configuration howto see sections 9 and 10 of:

The Very Verbose Debian Installation Walkthrough
http://osnews.com/story.php?news_id=2016

do a
#dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86

and follow the instructions from the article, choose Advanced, enter the horz and vert monitor freq you found in your monitor's manual or google, choose the resolution you want from the list, do the mouse, voilá.

after all it's your monitor, it's your money, might as well do it right.

Edit: for more information on how to configure other aspects of Debian after the installation, see the sticky at the top of the page.

Last edited by macondo; 11-02-2004 at 09:59 AM.
 
Old 11-02-2004, 09:48 AM   #6
steefje
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Solarbear :

i don't really have a problem with screen size
but what's wrong with your size, is it too small or large every time you reboot
i think it could also be your monitor that doesn't remember the settings you chose
 
Old 11-02-2004, 09:53 AM   #7
pevelius
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hacking the config ala slackware may not be pretty, but if you know what you need, then it is simple and painless.
so, if you know your monitor can do 1600x1200@85, then you can safely add it to XF86Config-4, delete other resolutions and startx until debian devs make a simple dialog that works (no offence, i love debian).
 
Old 11-02-2004, 09:57 AM   #8
SolarBear
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Quote:
Originally posted by macondo
Hacking the XFConfig-4 file a la Slackware is not a good idea, that's why Debian uses Debconf.

Your resolution is given as the result of the combination of information, given by you about your video card, monitors frequencies, to debconf..
And that's precisely what I did. Not trusting myself (a hard life-learned lesson), I did a new dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86 with advanced settings, putting the exact data as seen on my monitor's documentation and nothing changed. So yeah, I'd like to keep that nice monitor for a looooooooooong time but... well.

Could it be nVidia's driver ? I'm using the old nv one and I can't install the more recent one. Just making a wild guess.
 
Old 11-02-2004, 10:04 AM   #9
macondo
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Did you reboot?
 
Old 11-02-2004, 12:05 PM   #10
SolarBear
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Of course.
 
Old 11-02-2004, 01:40 PM   #11
macondo
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SolarBear:
if you did the Advanced configuration, chose your card ("nv", in your case), the amount of ram of your card, your CORRECT monitor's frequencies, then, chose the correct resolution from the long list of resolutions given (example: a 17" monitor uses 1024x768 by default, if you choose something higher, then, the refresh rate will suffer), chose your mouse (assuming it's a PS/2) as /dev/psaux in the first screen, and ImPS/2 (for the middle wheel), in the second screen, and said 'yes' to Emulate 3 button mouse in the third screen, your keyboard is xfree86 in the first screen, "us" in the second (unless you use another language), leave options and variant in blank, and then, rebooted, you shouldn't have had any problems, all this is explained excrutiatingly detailed in the article.

Last edited by macondo; 11-02-2004 at 01:42 PM.
 
Old 11-02-2004, 02:29 PM   #12
macondo
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"hacking the config ala slackware may not be pretty, but if you know what you need, then it is simple and painless.
so, if you know your monitor can do 1600x1200@85, then you can safely add it to XF86Config-4, delete other resolutions and startx until debian devs make a simple dialog that works (no offence, i love debian)."

pevelius:
Let see the facts: the reason you say is painful, it's because you're ignorant of the procedure of installation (no offense, we are all ignorant about something), this is due to lack of knowledge, which in turn is the product of the fact, that most people do not read, refuse to read, and want to take shortcuts.

Allow me to elaborate, in Debian, as soon as you finish the basic installation, you're left at the login prompt, you do a 'su' and become root, you apt-get x-window-system, locales, and your favorite window manager. When that is done, x-window-system thru debconf will pop up a dialog asking you if you want Debian to attempt to auto-detect your hardware, most times this works.
Is this painful?

If you say No or the auto-detection fails for some reason, you will have to do it manually, keyboard and mouse, are obvious, when it gets to the monitor, it will give you 3 configuration options: Simple, Medium, and Advanced.

Simple: if you are clueless about your resolution, and monitor frequencies, all you have to know is the size of your monitor's screen, Debian will take it from there, it might not be optimal, but it will work.
Is this painful?

Medium: if you know the resolution that your monitor can do at 76Hz but nothing else, use this option. Just choose the right one from the resolutions list and you're done.
Is this painful?

Advanced: if you know your resolution your monitor can do, and know the vertical and horizontal frequencies (a quick look in your monitor's manual or google the manufacturer's site for your model) then, use this one. Now, if this is too much work, what are you doing in Linux? Or Debian for that matter, when you have Knoppix, MEPIS, Libranet, KANOTIX, etc

Ahh, but everyone wants to be a geek, brag to their friends that they installed Debian, which has an unearned reputation as "hard to install",they refuse to read the articles which explains everything, just to come back and bellyache about how Debian is not working, and when told the answer, they come back the next day, with another asinine question already answered in the article. The reality is, that Debian has all the docs with the directions and instructions written, just waiting for the lazy user-to-be to get off his/her butt and do it.

Last edited by macondo; 11-03-2004 at 03:46 AM.
 
Old 11-04-2004, 06:32 AM   #13
pevelius
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hmm. now i don´t want to show off anything. but every time i have installed debian, autoconfig has failed, i don´t have the manual at hand and i don´t want to google the h/v-syncs because i can just input my resolution & refresh rate to conifg file. if i choose simple, i cannot get the rez i want. if i choose medium, give it the resolution i want, it still wont´t do it. and for advanced i´d need the manual of the monitor. so, "pico XF86Config-4" is for me the most painless thing to do after simple & medium fail (which has so far been every single time).
I know that there is a debian way. it is just not for me, since it keeps failing with my setups. why, i cannot tell. and i don´t really care. i have always managed to get it work with 5 secs of manual editing.
and btw, installing debian with the new netinstaller has been very smooth, i really cannot brag to anyone that i have managed to do it multiple times :/
 
Old 11-04-2004, 08:23 AM   #14
macondo
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LOL! you prove my point, i rest my case.
 
Old 11-04-2004, 02:25 PM   #15
jsmarshall85
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macondo you crack me up sometimes

SolarBear - what problems are you having with the new nVidia driver? (not to get too far off the original subject)
 
  


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