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Old 10-12-2017, 04:44 PM   #1
biplabbijay
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"rename" command does not want in cent os 7


Hi,

I have several ps files with names like

115_378D-014R315.57753.ps.

I want to rename the files with a leading zero, something like,

0115_378D-014R315.57753.ps.

I used the following command

Quote:
rename 's/\d+/sprintf("%04d", $&)/e' *.ps
which worked well in ubuntu 16.10. But it does not work in Cent OS. How to make this command work ion cent os ?

Also is there any way to add this zero at the beginning of the filename using mv command ?

Please help me in this regard.

Biplab
 
Old 10-12-2017, 07:03 PM   #2
yancek
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The mv command below will add a zero to the beginning of ALL files in the directory in which it is run.

Quote:
for i in *; do mv "$i" 0"$i"; done
The command below will add a zero to the beginning of ALL files with the .ps extension.

Quote:
for i in *.ps; do mv "$i" 0"$i"; done

Don't know about rename.
 
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Old 10-13-2017, 02:34 AM   #3
Turbocapitalist
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Stock CentOS comes only with a crippled immitation of rename. In order to get the perl rename you'll have to install the CPAN module File::Rename.

Or you can get it with yum by adding the EPEL repository and then adding the package "prename". That will give you what you are looking for with a script named prename. You can then rename it to "rename" if you wish.
 
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Old 10-13-2017, 03:24 AM   #4
biplabbijay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yancek View Post
The mv command below will add a zero to the beginning of ALL files in the directory in which it is run.



The command below will add a zero to the beginning of ALL files with the .ps extension.




Don't know about rename.
Thanks for the reply. But my problem is something different. Let me explain. Suppose I have 3 files like

Quote:
115_378D-014R315.57753.307353220123.gpt.fil_1.82ms_Cand.pfd.ps

93_181D-005R326.57781.265860916646.gpt.fil_0.67ms_Cand.pfd.ps

7_164D-005R316.57781.103152990363.gpt.fil_351.91ms_Cand.pfd.ps

I want to add zeros in the beginning in such a way that it will become

Quote:

0115_378D-014R315.57753.307353220123.gpt.fil_1.82ms_Cand.pfd.ps

0093_181D-005R326.57781.265860916646.gpt.fil_0.67ms_Cand.pfd.ps

0007_164D-005R316.57781.103152990363.gpt.fil_351.91ms_Cand.pfd.ps
I run this following script

Quote:

for a in *_*D-*R*.*.*.gpt.fil_*.*ms_Cand.pfd.ps; do


mv $a `printf %04d%s ${a%_*D-*R*.*.*.gpt.fil_*.*ms_Cand.pfd.ps} ${a##_*}`


done
and I got

Quote:
0115115_378D-014R315.57753.307353220123.gpt.fil_1.82ms_Cand.pfd.ps

009393_181D-005R326.57781.265860916646.gpt.fil_0.67ms_Cand.pfd.ps

00077_164D-005R316.57781.103152990363.gpt.fil_351.91ms_Cand.pfd.ps
in stead of

Quote:
0115_378D-014R315.57753.307353220123.gpt.fil_1.82ms_Cand.pfd.ps

0093_181D-005R326.57781.265860916646.gpt.fil_0.67ms_Cand.pfd.ps

0007_164D-005R316.57781.103152990363.gpt.fil_351.91ms_Cand.pfd.ps
is there anything wrong in this ? Can you help me out ?

Thanks in advance.

Biplab
 
Old 10-13-2017, 04:05 AM   #5
biplabbijay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist View Post
Stock CentOS comes only with a crippled immitation of rename. In order to get the perl rename you'll have to install the CPAN module File::Rename.

Or you can get it with yum by adding the EPEL repository and then adding the package "prename". That will give you what you are looking for with a script named prename. You can then rename it to "rename" if you wish.
Thank you very much for the reply. I tried this as follows :

Quote:

[root@localhost Rename]# yum install perl-App-cpanminus
[root@localhost Rename]# cpanm File::Rename
Now rename is working fine. But can I use mv for the same purpose ? The reason i say this because it will work in every platform.

Biplab
 
Old 10-13-2017, 04:17 AM   #6
Turbocapitalist
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The perl version of rename should be there on every platform. If not, it is easy enough to install it.

You can do a bash-specific substitution:

Code:
for a in *_*D-*R*.*.*.gpt.fil_*.*ms_Cand.pfd.ps; do 
    b=${a%%_*ps}; 
    c=$(/usr/bin/printf "%06.f" $b); 
    d=${a/$b/$c}; 
    echo mv -i $a $d; 
done;
In some ways that is less portable because not everyone uses bash for a shell. But I guess since ksh and zsh can handle that parameter substitution, it's close enough.

My preference is the perl rename, I find it more convenient.
 
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Old 10-13-2017, 04:28 AM   #7
biplabbijay
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Solved

Quote:
Originally Posted by Turbocapitalist View Post
The perl version of rename should be there on every platform. If not, it is easy enough to install it.

You can do a bash-specific substitution:

Code:
for a in *_*D-*R*.*.*.gpt.fil_*.*ms_Cand.pfd.ps; do 
    b=${a%%_*ps}; 
    c=$(/usr/bin/printf "%06.f" $b); 
    d=${a/$b/$c}; 
    echo mv -i $a $d; 
done;
In some ways that is less portable because not everyone uses bash for a shell. But I guess since ksh and zsh can handle that parameter substitution, it's close enough.

My preference is the perl rename, I find it more convenient.
Thank you very much. This script also works properly. Thanks a lot.

Biplab
 
  


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